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SWARTHMORE COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 

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Wo Colonel Jf rank barker 2Sap, 

siolbier anb abbenturEr, tDilling teacftcr anb able 
Icaber, totos^f s^pirit of courage, feinblineSS anb 
lopaltp f)as been an inspiration to us; for tfje past 
ttDo pears, tofjose ability ijas been recognt^eb bp 
appointment to tije presibencp of Pinion QloUege, 
anb tofjoSe absence toill be feeenlp felt bp all tdl)o 
i)abe fenoton Ijim, tlje class of 1930 reSpectfuUp 
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^tminisftration 




FRANK AYDELOTTE, 

A.B., A.M., B.LiTi., LL.D., D.Litt. 

President of Swarthmore College 

A.B., Indiana University, lono: A.M.. Har- 
vard University, 1(103: Rliodes Scholar, Oxford 
University: B.Litt., Oxford University, 1908: 
LL.D., Alleglieny College, 192.3: D.Litt., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1924: D.Litt.. Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, 1925: D. Litt., Oberlin Col- 
lege, 1!I2(;: LL.D., Yale L'niversitv, 192S. For- 
mer protes.sor of English at California State 
-Xormal School. Indiana State L'niversity and 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Amer- 
ican Secretary to Rhodes Scholarship Trustees: 
President, Swarthmore College, since 1921. 



24] 




Detlev W. Bronk, Ph.D 
Dean 



Raymond Walters, M.A. 
Dean of the College 



Frances B. Blanshard, M.A. 
Dean of Women 



Board of Managers 

President Wilson M. Powell 

Treasurer Charles T. Brown 

Secretary Hetty Lippincott Miller 

TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 1929 

Joanna Wharton Lippincott Philadelphia. Pa. 

Howard Cooper .loiinson Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hetty Lippincott Miller. Riverton, N. J. 

Elsie Palmer Brown Washington, D. C. 

Henry C. Turner New York, N. Y. 

Daniel Underhill Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Esther H. Cornell Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Robert E. Lamb Philadelphia, Pa. 

TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 1930 

Rebecca C. Longstreth Haverford, Pa. 

Caroline H. Worth Coatesville, Pa. 

Robert Pyle West Grove, Pa. 

Edward B. Temple - Swarthmore, Pa. 

Walter Roberts, M.D Swarthmore, Pa. 

Francis M. White Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clement M. Biddle New York, N. Y. 

TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 19.31 

Edward Martin, M.D Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wilson M. Powell : New York, N. Y. 

WiUiam M. Cocks Westbury, L. I., N. Y. 

Lucy Biddle Lewis Lansdowne, Pa. 

Philip M. Sharpies West Chester, Pa. 

Mary Hibbard Thatcher Swarthmore, Pa. 

Mary Wharton Mendelson Germantown, Pa. 

Isaac H. Clothier, J r Philadelphia, Pa. 

TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 1932 

Emma C. Bancroft Wilmington, Del. 

Charles F. Jenkins Philadelphia, Pa. 

Robert H. Walker Baltimore, Md. 

T. Stockton Matthews Baltimore, Md. 

Mary Lippincott Griscom Moorestown, N. J. 

Charles T. Brown ....Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ada Graham Clement - Jenkmtown, Pa. 




Jfacultp 




JOHN ANTHONY MILLER. A.B.. A.M.. Ph.D. 

Vice-President of the College 

Edward H. Magill, Professor of Mathematics and 

Astronomy, and Director of Sproid Observatory 

A.B., Indiana University, 1890: A.M., Leland Stan- 
ford Junior University, 1893; Pli.D., University of 
Chicago, 1899. Graduate Student, University of Chi- 
cago, lS9o-97. and summer term, 1S9S. Instructor in 
Mathematics, Indiana University, January to June, 
1890: Superintendent of Schools, Rocl<ville. Ind., 1890- 
91: Instructor in Mathematics, Iceland Stanford 
Junior University, 1891-92 : Assistant Professor of 
Matliematics, 1893-94: Acting Professor of Mathema- 
tics, Indiana University, 1894-95: Professor of Me- 
chanics and Astronomy, 1895-1906. Professor of 
Mathematics and Astronomy, Swartlimore College, 
since 190G. Vice-President, from 1914. 



WILLIAM ISAAC HULL, A.B„ Ph.D. 

Isaac H. Clothier Professor of History and 

International Relations 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1889: Ph.D., 1892. 
Student of History, Universities of Berlin, 1891, and 
Leyden, 1907. Associate Professor of History and 
Economics. Swarthmore College, 1892-94 : Joseph 
Wharton Professor of History and Political Science, 
1894-1904: Professor of History, 1904-11: Professor of 
History and International Relations, from 1911. 





JESSE HERMAN HOLMES, B.S.. Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

B.S., University of Nebraska, 1884: Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1890. Graduate Student in Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1SS4-S5 : Harvard University, 
summer of 1S95; Oxford University, 1R99-1900; Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1903-05 and 1911-12. Pro- 
fessor of the History of Relig'on and Philo.snohy. 
Swarthmore College, 1899-1922. Professor of Philoso- 
phy since 1922. 



HAROLD CLARKE GODDARD, A.B., A.M.. Ph.D. 
Alexander Griswold Cummins Professor of English 
A.B., .^.mherst College, 1900: A. M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1903: Ph.D., Columbia University, 1900. In- 
structor in Mathematics, Amherst College. 1900-1902; 
Instructor in English, Northwestern University, 
1904-1909; Professor of English, Swarthmore College, 
since 1909. 




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ROBERT CLARKSON BROOKS, A.B., Ph.D. 
Joseph W harlon Professor of Political Science 
A.B., Indiana University, 1890; Pli.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1903. President White Fellow in Political 
and Social Science, Cornell University, 1S97-98 : 
President White Traveling Fellow, Universities of 
Halle and Berlin, 1S98-99: Instructor in Economics, 
Cornell University, 1899-1904; Joseph Wharton Pro- 
fessor of Economics, Swarthmore College, 1901-08; 
Professor of Political Science, University of Cin- 
cinnati*, 1908-12; Professor of Political Science, 
Swarthmore College, from 1912. 




SAMUEL COPELAND PALMER, 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 
A.B., Swarthmore College, 1895; A.M., Swarthmore 
College, 1907; A.M., Harvard University, 1909; Ph.D., 
Harvard Universitv, 1912 ; Joshua Lippincott Fellow, 
Swarthmore College, 1907-08 and 1910-11; Student, 
Summer School, Harvard University. 1903 and 190S; 
Holder of Philadelphia Academy of National Sci- 
ence's Table, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods 
Hole, Mass., 1907; Student, Bermuda Biological Sta- 
tion, 1909. Assistant in Zoological Laboratory, Rad- 
cliffe College, 1908-09; Assistant in Zoological Lab- 
oratory, Harvard University, 1907-09. Director of 
Athletics, Swarthmore Preparatory School, 1895-1900; 
A^ice-Principal, 1900-07; Acting .'Assistant Professor of 
Biology and Geology, Swarthmore College, 1909-10; 
.\ssistant Professor, 1911-23. Associate Professor of 
Biology, since 1923. 



WILL CARSON RY.iN, JR., 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Education 

A.B., Harvard, 1907; Columbia, 1907-1910; Ph.D., 
George Washington University, 1918; Instructor 
French and German, Nutley High School, N. J., 1909- 
1910; Carl Schurz Fellow Columbia, 1910-1911; In- 
structor in German, University of Wisconsin, 1911- 
1912; Editor, U. S. Bureau of Education, 1912-1917; 
Direct Information Service. 1917-1920 ; Educational 
Editor, N. Y. Evening Post, 1920-1921; Professor of 
Education, 1921- ; Lecturer in Education, George 

Washington University, U. of Pittsburgh, U. of Penn- 
sylvania and Woolman School, since 1910; Headed 
Vocational .Survey, Province of Saskatchewan, 1917- 
1918; Secretary British Educational Mission to U. S., 
1918; Associate Editor, School and Society, 1921; 
Educational Surveys to Santo Domingo, 1924; Porto 
Rico, 1925; also author of many educational bulletins. 





CLARA PRICE NEWPORT, A.B., Ph.D. 

Professor of the German Language and 
Literature 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1903; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1908; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1903-04 ; Student of Ger- 
man and French, University of Berlin, Sor- 
bonne and College de France and University 
of Munich, 1904-05; Graduate Scholar in Ger- 
man, University of Wisconsin, 190()-07 ; Teach- 
ing Fellow in German, 1907-08; Instructor in 
Latin, Swarthmore College, 1908-09; Acting 
Assistant Professor of German, Swarthmore 
College, 1909-10; Instructor in German, Uni- 
versity of Kansas, 1910-12; Assistant Profes- 
sor of German, Swarthmore College, from 
1912-17; Professor of the German Language 
and Literature, from 1917. 







LEWIS FUSSELL, B.S., M.S., E.E., Ph.D. 
Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Swarthmore College, 1902: M.S., 1903: 
E.E.. University of Wisconsin, 1907: Ph.D.. 
1907; Student, Cornell Summer School, 1901: 
Joshua Lippincott Fellow (Swarthmore Col- 
lege), University of Wisconsin, 1905-06; In- 
structor in Physics. Swarthmore College, 1902- 
0.5: Assistant in Electrical Engineering, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1906-07; Instructor in 
Electrical Engineering, Swarthmore College, 
1907-09; Assistant Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering, 1909-22: Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering, since 1922. 

ALFRED MANSFELD BROOKS, AB., A.M. 

Professor of Fine Arts 
A.B., Harvard University, 1894; A.M., 1S99 ; 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology School 
of Architecture, 1894-93; Hon. A.M., Indiana 
University, 1911; Instructor in Fine Arts, In- 
diana University, 1896-99; Assistant Professor, 
1899-1904; Associate Professor, 1904-06; Junior 
Professor, 1906-07; Professor, 1907-22; Profes- 
sor of Fine Arts, Swarthmore, since 1922; 
Indiana Univei'sity Curator of Prints, John 
Heem Art Institute, Indianapolis; Fellow 
Royal Society of Arts; Author of "The Newell 
Fortune," 1906; "Simes House," 1909; "Archi- 
tecture and the Allied Arts," 1913; "Dante. 
How to Know Him." 1916: "Great Artists and 
Their Works." 1919: "Letters of J. Ruskin to 
\V. Ward," 1921; "Xotes on Drawing and En- 
irraving," 1919, "Our Architectural Debt to 
(■.reece and Rome," 1923; also author of many 
iirticles on art. 

WESTON EARLE FULLER, C.E. 
Professor of Civil Engineering 

C.E., Cornell University, 1900; Instructor in 
Civil Engineering, Cornell University, 1901-02; 
i:ngineer in charge of the Ithaca Water Works, 
11)02-03 ; Engineer in charge of the Watertown 
and Poughkeepsie Water Works, 1904-05; 
Hazen & Whipple, New York, 1906: Member 
of firm of Hazen. Whipple & Fuller, since 
1907 ; Professor of Civil Engineering, Swarth- 
more College, since 1922. and Chairman of the 
Division of Engineering, since 1924. 

DETLEV W: BRONK. A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
Dean of Men and Professor of 
Phvsiology and Biophysics 
A.B., Swarthmore College, 1920; M. S., Vni- 
versity of Michigan, 1922; Ph.D., University 
of Michigan, 1925; Instructor in Physics, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1921; Instructor in 
Physics and Physiology, University of Michi- 
gan, 1922-26. 



EVERETT L. HUNT, A.B.. A.M. 
Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory 
A.B.. Huron College: M.A.. University of 
Chicago ; Assistant Professor of Public Speak- 
ing, Cornell University: Acting Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Public Speaking. Swarthmore College, 
1925-26: Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, 
1926. 



ARNOLD DRESDEN, S.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics 

S M., University of Amsterdam, 1903: Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1909: Former Professor 
of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin, 1909- 
27; Professor of Mathematics, Swarthmore 
College, since 1927. 







[28] 






HENRY JERMAIN MAUDE CREIGHTON, 
B.A., M.A. 
Professor of Chemistry 
B.A., Dalhousie University. 1900; M.A.. Dal- 
housie University. 1907; M.Sc. University of 
Birmingliam. 1909; D.Sc, Das eidgenossisches 
Polytechnikum. Zilrich. 1911 ; University of 
Heidelberg. 1909-19; Dalhouse University, sum- 
mers of 1914 and 1915; H. M. Royal 1851 Ex- 
hibition Science. Research Scholar, 1908-10; 
Demonstrator in Chemistry. Dalhousie Univer- 
sity, 1907-08: Lecturer on Physical Chemistry. 
1911-1912 : Instructor in Chemistrj-. Swarth- 
more College, 1912-13; Assistant Professor, 
1913-23 ; Associate Professor of Chemistry, 
since 1923. 



WINTHROP R. WRIGHT, A.B., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Physics 
A.B.. University of Michigan. 1909: Tyndall 
Fellow in Physics. Columbia University. 1913- 
1.5; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 1917; As- 
sistant Physicist. Bureau of Standards, 1917- 
19: S\varthmore College Eclipse Expeditions. 
1923 and 1925; Cavendish Laboratory, Cam- 
bridge University, 1925-26 ; Investigation of 
Hydrogen Spectrum. 



PHILIP MARSHALL HICKS, 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 
A.B.. Swarthmore College. 1905; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1913; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 1923; Associate 
Professor of English. Swarthmore College. 
1923. 



EUGENE LeROY MERCER, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

M.D.. University of Pennsylvania, 1913; 
AU-American Fullback, 1910 and 1912; 
Olympic Broad Jumper. 1912. 



BRAND BLANSHARD, 
B.A., M.A., B.Sc, Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 
• B.A., University of Michigan. 1914; M.A.. 
Columbia University. 1918; B.Sc. Oxford Uni- 
versity. 1920; Ph.D.. Harvard University; 
Publisher of articles and reviews in philo- 
sophical journals; Lecturer. Columbia Univer- 
sity. 1917-18: Assistant Professor. University 
of Michigan. 1921-23: Associate Professor of 
Philosophy, Swarthmore College, 1925 — . 




HERBERT ERASER, M.A. 
Professor of Economics 

M.A., First Honors in Econ. Science. Uni- 
versity of Aberdeen. Aberdeen, Scotland; 
F.R.. Econ. Science; Author of "Foreign Trade 
and World Politics." 






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CHARLES GARRETT THATCHER, 
A.B., M. E. 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
A.B., Swarthmore College, 1912: M.E. Cor- 
nell University, 1916; Instructor in Engineer- 
ing at Cornell University, 1914-lfi : Associate 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and 
Graduate Manager of Athletics, since 1921. 



CHARLES R. BAGLEY, A.M., B.Litt. 
Associate Professor of French 

College of William and Mai->', 1910-11; B..A.., 
Duke University, 1913; M.A., Duke University, 
1915; Instructoi- of Latin, Director of Athletics, 
Spartanburg High School, 191.")-l('i ; Instructor 
of French, Duke Universitv, 191i;-17; Captain 
Company B, 321 Infantry, A.E.F., 1917-19; 
Diploma in French Literature, Uni\-ersit:\' of 
Paris, 1919 ; Rhodes Scholar from North Caro- 
lina, St. John's College, Oxford L'niversity; 
E.A. (Honors), B.Litt., 1919-22; Diploma in 
French, University of Poitiers, summer 1920; 
Instructor of French, University of North 
Carolina, 1922-23; Instructor of French, 
Swarthmore College, since 1923 ; President, Ox- 
ford University French Club, 1921. 

FREDERICK J. MANNING, A.B., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of History 

A.B.. Yale University, 1911; ; Field Artillery, 
U. S. Army, 1917-18; Armv War College, 1919; 
Instructor in History, Tale 1919-1922; Studied 
in England, 1922-1923; Instructor in History, 
Yale, 1923-1925; Ph.D., Tale University, 1925; 
Assistant Professor of History at Swarthmore, 
since 1925. 

JOHN HINES PITMAN, A.B.. A.M. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and 
Astronomy 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1910; A.M., 
Swarthmore College, 1911 ; Lippincott Fellow, 
at Swarthmore College, 1911-12 ; Lick Observa- 
tory Fellow, at University of Califoi'nia, 1911- 
13; Instructor of Mathematics and Astronomy, 
Swarthmore College, 1913-18 ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Astronomy, Swarth- 
more College, 1918-28 ; Associate Professor of 
Mathematics and Astronomy, Swarthmore 
College, since 1928; Member of the American 
Astronomical Society; Fellow of the Royal 
Astronomical Society; Fellow of the American 
Association for Advancement of Science; Mem- 
ber of Sigma Xi ; Publications ; Scientific 
Papers on Stellar Parallaxes, Masses of Stars, 
Comet Orbits, etc. 



HOWARD MALCOLM JENKINS. A.B., E.E. 
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

A.B., Swarthmore College. 1920; E.E., Ibid., 
1923; Insti-uctor in the Department of Elec- 
trical Engineering, Swarthmore College, 1921- 
20 ; Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing, 1920 — . 



FRANCES M. BURLINGAME. 
A.B., Ed.M., Ed.D. 
Assistant Professor of Education 
A.B., Radcliffe College, 1918: Ed.M., Har- 
vard University, 1924; Ed.D., Ibid., 1920: 
Taught at Harlowton, Montana. Public High 
School, 1919-22; Taught at Ferry Hall, Lake 
Forest, 111., 1922-23; Assistant in the Depart- 
ment of Education, Wellesley College, 1925-20; 
Instructor in the Department of Education, 
Swarthmore College, 1926-27; Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Education, since 1927. 









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[30 







GEORGE F. THOMAS, A.B. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Southern Methodist University. 1919; 
B.A. (Honors), Oxford Universitv, 1923; In- 
structor, Southern Methodist University, 1923- 
23; Graduate Student, Harvard University, 
1925-27; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 
Swarthmore College, 1927 — . 



MARY ALBERTSON, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of History 

Studied at University of London. Studied 
at Bryn Mawr College. Taught at Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr. Taught in Bryn Mawr 
Summer School for Women in Industry. Com- 
pleted work for Ph.D. degree, which, by the 
rules of Bryn Mawr College, is not used until 
thesis for the degree has been published. 



ETHEL HAMPSON BREWSTER, 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Greek and Latin 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1907: A.M. Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1911; Ph.D., 191.5; 
Special Bennett Fellow in Latin, University 
of Pennsylvania, 1912-13 ; Bennett Fellow in 
Classics, 1913, to February, 1911 ; Instructor in 
Latin, Vassar College. February, 1914, to June, 
191(); Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin, 
Swarthmore College, 1916-23; Associate Profes- 
sor of Greek and Latin, since 1923 ; Dean of 
Women, 1921-192S. 



CLAIR WILCOX, B.S., A.M.,Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Economics 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1919; 
A.M., Ohio State University. 1922; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1927. Instruc- 
tor at Lafayette College, Ohio Wesleyan 
University, and University of Pennsylvania. 



MICHEL S. KOVALENKO, B.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

- B.S., Technological College, Taganrog. Rus- 
sia ; Diploma from Emperor Nicholas Institute 
of Technology; Les Sc, Sorbonne; Ph.D., 
Princeton, 1926-27: Taught at Taganrog, 1912- 
16; Officer, Russian Navy, 1917-20; Awardeil 
Saint George Cross; Instructor of Mathema- 
tics. Naval College, Tunis. Algeria, 1920-22: 
Instructor of Russian Students, Sorbonne, 
1922-24: Instructor in Astronomy, University 
of A^irginia, McCormick Observatory, 1924-25: 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Astronomy, Swarthmore College, since 1-927. 



ALAN C. VALENTINE, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Swarthmore, 1921; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1922; B.A., Oxford. 1925; M.A., 
Oxford, 192S. Rhodes Scholar, 1922-1925. 






31 





MILAN W. GARRETT, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
B.A., Leland Stanford University, 1920; 
M.A., Leland Stanford TJniversitv, 1921; B.A., 
Oxford Univvirsity, 1924; Ph.D., Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1926; Publisher of articles in "Pro- 
ceedings of Royal Society." 



TROYER STEELE ANDERSON, A.B., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1922; M.A., Har- 
vard University, 1923 : Rhodes Scholar at New 
College, Oxford, 1923-26; Instructor in His- 
tory, Brown University, 192li-2S; Assistant 
Professor of History, Swarthmore College, 
since 1928. 



DUNCAN GRAHAM FOSTER, 

A.B.. M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Harvard University. 1918: M.A., Har- 
vard University, 1921; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University, 1923; Former Professor of Chem- 
istry at Simmons and St. Stephen's Colleges : 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Swarthmor.- 
College, 1928 — . 



LUCIUS ROGERS SHERO, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of Greek 

A.B., Haverford College, 1911; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1912; Rhodes Scholar, at 
New College, Oxford, 1912-15: Professor of 
Greek St. Stephen's College, 1920-28; Professor 
of Greek, Swarthmore College, since 192S. 





cers 



President Frank Aydelotte, A.M., L.H.D., Lilt.B. LL.D. 

Vice-President John Anthony Miller, Ph.D., F.R.A.S. 

Dean Raymond Walters, M.A. 

Dean of Women Frances B. Blanshard, M.A. 

Dean of Men Detlev W. Bronk, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Librarian Charles B. Shaw, A.B., LL.B. 

Librarian of Friends' Historical Library. John Russell Hayes. LL.B. 

Comptroller .:. Nicholas O. Pittinger, A.B. 

Superintendent Chester Roherts 

Alumni Recorder Caroline Augusta Lukens, B.L. 

Dietitian Anna C. Brierly 

Assistant Librarian Alice W. Swayne 

Resident Engineer Andrew Simpson, M.S. 



Professors Emeritiias 

George Arthur Hoadley, D.Sc Emeritus Prof, of Physics 

Spencer Trotter, M.D - Emeritus Prof, of Biology 

Isabelle Bronk, Ph.D Emeritus Prof, of the French Lanuage & Literature 

Henrietta Josephine Meeteer. Ph.D Emeritus Prof, of Greek and Latin 



Professors, Ins true tors and Lecterers 



Ross TT. Marriott. Ph.D_ Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

Robert Ernest Spiller, Ph.D Assistant Professor of English 

Alfred J. Swan Director of Music 

Edward H. Cox, M.A., D.Sc Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Maurice J. Babb, Ph.D Acting Professor of Mathematics 

Mercedes C. Iribas Instructor in Spanish 

Marie-Emma Bourdin Bacher, B.S Professor at-es-Lettres. Instructor in French 

Elizabeth F. Lanning, A.B Director of Physical Education for Women 

Elizabeth H. Brooks. A.B tutor in French and German 

Richmond P. Miller, A.B Instructor in Political Science 

Walter J. Scott, M.S Instructor in Physiology and Zoology 

Richard W. Slocum, A.B., LL.B Part-time Instructor in Law 

George A. Bourdelais Instructor in Engineering 

Lydia Baer, A.B - Instructor in German 

William M. Blaisdell, A.B Instructor in Economics 

Franklin Brewster Folsom, A.B. Part-time Instructor in English 

Fredric S. Klees Instructor in English 

William S. LaLonde, Jr., B.S Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Margaret Pitkin, Ph.D Instructor in French 

Arthur J. Rawson, A.B Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

Dorothy F. Troy, A.B Instructor in English 

Lucia Norton Valentine, A.B Part-time Instructor in French 

Jane Beardwood, Ph.D Part-time Instructor in French 

Paul M. Pearson, Litt.D Honorary Lecturer in Public Speaking 

Edith M. Everett, M.A Lecturer in Education 

S. W. Johnson Lecturer in Accounting 

Arthur W. Ferguson, Ph.D Lecturer in Education 

Louis N. Robinson, Ph.D Lecturer in Hygiene 

P. F. Giroud. Litt.D Lecturer in French 

Charlotte Young, M.A Rhodes^ Trust Travelling Fellow, Lecturer in English 

W. A. Matos, B.A., F.R.A.S Volunteer Observer in the Sproul Observatory 

Frank Fitts Assistant in Physical Education of Men 

Robert Dunn - Assistant in Physical Education of Men 

Virginia Neal Brown, B.A Assistant in Physical Education of Women 

Alice M. Rogers, A.B Research Assistant in Mathematics 

Samuel R. M. Reynolds, A.B Assistant in Physiology and Zoology 

H. J. Curtis, B.S .'. Part-time Assistant in Physics 

Eilene Slack Galloway, A.B Part-time Assistant in Political Science 

Walter B. Kei<rhton, A.B - Part-time Assistant in Chemistry 

Albert Smith..- Part-time A ssistant in French 




Alumni 



Swarthmore Alminitii Association 

THE Swarthmore College Alumni Association, founded in 1875, is the gen- 
eral organization of all individual alumni and akinini clubs. Through it 
graduates are enabled to keep in touch with the college and with one an- 
other. Almuni Day is the one time in the year when every group is united and 
the emphasis is laid on class reunions rather than fraternity or club reunions. 
Interested at all times in promoting the College welfare, the Alumni As- 
sociation finds its greatest outlet in the Commencement Week activities. On 
Alumni Day in the Commencement of 1928 there were special reunions of the 
classes of '73, '78, '83, '88, "93, '98, '03, '08, '13, '18, '23, and '26. William H. Sea- 
man, '88, was master of ceremonies, special features of the day being an alumni 
luncheon in the college dining room, special reunion suppers, and an Alumni 
Dance in Hall Gymnasium. 

Officers 1929 

President Emmor Roberts, '11 

Vice-Presidents Spencer Lawrence Coxe, '07 

William Henry GiUam, '13 

Hugh F. Denworth, '16 

Secretary-Treasurer .... Abby Mary Hall Roberts, '90 

Board of Directors 



1929 
Louella Passmore Hayes, '89 
EHiot Richardson, '92 
William Webb Price, '12 



1930 
Anna Jenkins Webster, '87 
Bertha Lippencott Parrish. "95 
James G. Lamb. '10 



34 






la 



THE Swartlimore Club of Pliiladelphia is an organization of alumni and 
supporters of the college living in the city and adjacent territory. Its chief 
function is a social one, a luncheon being held on the first Wednesday of 
each niontli, at which time the members are addressed by prominent speakers. 
The Club enjoys a membership of approximately two hundred and twenty-five. 
Recommendations on matters beneficial to the college are often made to the 
President and the Board of Managers. The annual Swartlimore banquet was 
held by the Club at the Bellevue-Stratford this year on Friday, March 8, and 
proved a decided success. 

Officers for the year 1928-29. 

President Edwin A. Lucas, '14 

Secretary Charles E. Rickards, '27 

Treasurer Guy W. Davis, '24 



The Swartlimore Alimiiiae Clii!]) 



la 



THE Swartlimore Alumnae Cluli of Philadelphia was formed for the pur- 
pose of giving Swartlimore women in and about Philadelphia an oppor- 
tunity to keep in touch with each other and the college. At the meetings 
held three times a year interest is stimulated in constructive plans for aiding 
and improving the college. The Club regularly contributes to the Bureau of 
Occupations which aids college women in obtaining advantageous positions, and 
the New York and Philadelphia alumnae have combined in raising money for an 
open scholarship for women. 

Officers for 1928-29. 

President Mary W. Green, '92 

Vice-President Elinor Janney Johns, '08 

Secretary Caroline A. Lukens, '98 

Treasurer Edith C. Bunting, '12 



The Swairtlimore Alemiii Club 



The Swarthmore Club of New York is one of the college's oldest alumni 
organizations, and at present has a membership of over one hvmdred and fifty. 
The chief function of the Club is a social one. A smoker was held this year at 
which several members of the college faculty were present and recounted the 
the latest Swarthmore news, and plans of the future. 

Officers for 1928-29. 

President Fred N. Price, '05 

Vice-President William J. Bradley, '09 

Secretary-Treasurer L. S. Ayars, Jr., '24 



Henry B. Seaman, '81 
J. Hibbard Taylor, '03 
Clement M. Biddle, '96 
Scott B. Lilly 
F. M. McDowell, '13 



Board of Governors 

J. S. Wetherald, '15 
Raymond E. Michener, '19 
A. C. Valentine, '21 
Chester G. A. Zucker, '24 
Georije B. Jackson, '21 



The Swarthmore Women's Cleh 



TWELVE years ago the Swarthmore Women's Club of New York was or- 
ganized for the purpose of promoting the interest and support of the col- 
lege among its members. It now has an active membership of approxi- 
mately one hundred and twenty-five. A luncheon is held in the fall, when some 
representative from Swarthmore is invited to bring the Club the latest news of 
the college. The organization contributes annually to the Alumnae open scholar- 
ships. 

Officers for the year 1928-29. 

President Margaret Laurie Seaman, '89 

Vice-President Gladys Griffin Van Name, '16 

Secretary-Treasurer Phebe U. Seaman, '19 

Executive Committee. 
Irvanna Wood Tyson, '10 Elizabeth Andrews Jenks, '18 
Phebe P. Willis, ex '90 Gladys Cisney, '25 



:36] 



The Western Swartlimore Clialb 



Yfi 



THE Western Swartlimore Club was organized in 1903 by a group of 
Alumni living in or abovit Chicago. It has gradually increased in size, how- 
ever, and at the present time includes in its membership graduates and 
former Swartlimore students hving west of the Allegheny Mountains. The Club 
holds an annual meeting and banquet, besides occasional luncheons throughout 
the year. In 1906 the Western Swartlimore Club Scholarship for Men was estab- 
lished for the purpose of stimulating interest in Swartlimore College and her 
ideals among residents of the Western States, of promoting the best interests of 
Swartlimore College by sending to her campus students of well rounded char- 
acter and ability, who would carry with them the spirit and ideals of the West, 
and of creating for the Club itself a unifying interest and worth-while purpose. 



Oncers for 1928-29. 

President Harry A. Olin, '19 

Vice-Presidents Arthur G. Hoadley, '02 

David A. Rowlands, '09 
James J. Shock, '13 

Secretary E- Tasso Morgan, '17 

Treasurer . Allin H. Pierce, '19 



SoMtlierii California Club 

EIGHT years ago the Swarthmore Club of Southern California was formed 
with a membership of seventeen. The club has increased considerably 
since that time, and at the annual dinner, held on Feb. 9, 1929, thirty- 
five Swarthmoreans were present. Beside the annual banquet a picnic is held 
in mid-summer at which time the members present informal programs designed 
to recall old memories and to give information regarding the recent activities 
of the college. Graduates and Swartlimore students visiting in California are 
welcome to attend the meetings of the Club. 



Officers for 1928-29. 

President Louise Wood Ferris 

Vice-President Murray A. Stouer 

Secretary-Treasurer Mary Brosius 



Ci)e gear 




FROM Halcyon to Hal- 
cyon, and so on far 
into the dim past, far 
into the dim futnre; and 
the college stands aside, 
quietly, to let us pass. Poor 
footworn halls, poor echo- 
ing walls, — is it anything 
to them that for another 
year we have laughed and 
played and worked and 
wept and grown tall, or is 
it just another year? Per- 
haps they laugh too, and 
play and work, and weep a 
little as each succeeding 
year sees some go "out'n' 
heyond." But they must 
grow very weary of watch- 
Class Day jjjg^ ajj^ wish sometimes 

that they might have had 
the fun of living it all, for just one halcyon year. The nicest year, of course, — 
and that wovild have been '28 to '29. Then they would have the fun of re- 
membering too, as we remember with our scribbled Wanamaker diaries and 
our hoarded Phoenixes. 

Commencement they would remember; sweltering seniors in cap and gown; 
the Class Day exercises in Magill Auditorium — history, prophecy, poem and 
presentations, — seniors making merry as only seniors can who are counting the 
hours before good-bye. The laying of the corner stone of The Biddle Memorial 
Library. And that night, under the sky and the trees, "Sherwood", with Robin 
Hood and Maid Marian disporting. Then Alumnae Day, — Sherwood by daylight: 
the alumni luncheon with the seniors as guests; the parade to the athletic field 
for class stunts and awarding of prizes and a baseball game; and to close the 
day, the Alumni Dance. Baccalaureate Sunday, with President Aydelotte's ad- 
dress in the Friends' Meeting House; and later in the day the traditional plant- 
ing of the ivy under '28's class motto "Stand for truth," and Alexander Mac- 
Dougall's Ivy Oration. Then — Commencement Day! And rain. Faculty and 
students in solemn convocation to hear the commencement address of Dr. Max 
Mason, President of the University of Chicago, and to witness the presentation 
of the one hundred and thirty-six degrees. Perhaps the Senior dance that eve- 
ning, the first dance to be held in the new Bond Memorial Building, was an anti- 
climax to the fine seriousness of the commencement exercises: but it was more 
then a premonition of many dances to be, under the spiked chandeliers of Bond ! 
— And all the quiet corners of the campus, how many long good-byes they would 
remember . . . 

A peaceful summer then, with only faint intimation now and again of let- 



7^ ters and telegrams and speeding trains, until, with September — freshmen! 

Many freshmen. Freshmen to be exanied and placed. Freshmen to be recepted 
and entertained. Freshmen to be rushed. Freshmen men to wear name-tags and 
be hazed in cruel mid-night parties before Parrish. Freshmen, girls to pop and 
be popped and forbidden to fuss. One hundred and eighty brand new shining 
freshmen to endure and be endured just as have eons of freshmen before them 
And they did; and they were. 

But there was something a little different; something which hadn't hap- 
pened at Swarthmore for at least four years. Politics! Organization of Demo- 
crats and Republicans and Socialists. Noisy rallies and speakers. Norman 
Thomas himself for the Socialists; Henry Moscowitz from the ranks of Al Smith; 
Carroll Beedy upholding the triumphant Republican banner . . . Wagers won 
and lost; many happy homes of Parrish divided — on one door "This Home Is 
For Hoover", and on the other "Vote for Thomas" . . . And on election day a real 
poll in the Phoenix Office which solemnly recorded Swarthmote College as 
standing for Hoover, with 336 votes out of 563. 

We're skipping, though. There was the debut of the Garnet Serenaders at 
the sophomore-freshman reception. Which was a big great event indeed be- 
cause the Garnet Serenaders have since come out and very frequently and to 
great advantage. There was the lecture — or rather the dramatic monologue of 
Count Felix von Luckner, which sent the college off into quite unintelligible 
rhapsodies of By Joves and clear consciences and Buffalo Bills. Perhaps the 
effervescing enthusiasm can be made to account for some of the peculiarities 
of the college pictvire which was taken on front campvis; the next day by a most 
disgruntled photographer. 

Mr. A. A. Milne seems to be a particular favorite with Swarthmore, from 
his littlest Piglet to his most respectably-full-length play. At any rate, "The 
Dover Road" was quite the most popular feature of Founders' week-end, and 
its audience quite put to shame those which gathered for the lectures of Dr. 
Rhees, Dr. Funk, and Dr. Palmer during the afternoon and evening exercises of 
Fovinders' Day. The football game, too. was highly successful — from the Swarth- 
more point of view, if not from the Johns Hopkins. And oh how five hundred 
weary people did revel in the holiday! No one even thought of laughing when 
one little home-sick fresliman remarked as it left on the 8:19, "Gee but Fm glad 
Swarthmore was founded!" 

November opened au- 
spiciously with dissension 
in the ranks: The Debate 
of The Professors. College 
pricked up its ears. But 
no; disappointing- 
ly enough, it turned but to 
be not a debate, but three 
quite dignified and profes- 
sorially correct speeches : 
Professor Brooks for the 
Democrats, Professor 
Holmes for the Socialists, 
and Professor Fraser for 
the Republicans. Results 
we have already observed. 
On November third the 
old halls echoed to strange 
sounds. — Not as alarming 
as it might seem: — merely 
fifty foreign students stop- A Traditional Freshman Reception 



'^''''«'i«/f." 




Planting the Class Ivy 



ping in to observe us and 
our methods and our work. 
Suffice it to say that they 
were greatly mystified. We 
can imagine. — .lust how 
uoiild one go about to ex- 
plain fussing and the Pet 
and peanuts in the ice 
cream? About this time 
too we first noticed the two 
new portraits in the noble 
Collection, — Dr. Trotter 
and Dr. Hoadley, both 
painted by R. Sloan Bre- 
din. We noticed them, and 
we wondered vaguely if 
they would enjoy collec- 
tion as much as we. 

Twenty-five dollars left 
the hands of the loyal 
brotherhood of Delta Up- 
silon and passed into the possession of one Robert Kintner '31, at the annual 
speaking contest. It was a hard-fought contest, with some liigh-pressure orating. 
Kintner won his laurels with some remarks on the new book "The Undergrad- 
viate". Less exciting but perhaps more educational was the Somerville lecture 
by Walter Pritchard Eaton on "What is Modern Drama". Two nights later, 
November seventeenth, the college musical groups earned considerable public- 
ity by their production of "Hugh the Drover". We sometimes wonder, in view, 
or rather hearing, of tlie strange sounds to be heard at times in the halls and 
on the quad, whether .Swarthmore was born un-musical or just grew that way. 
But Dr. Swann has restored our faith; and our opinion that "Hugh the Drover" 
was more than a worthy effort, is authenticated by most favorable criticism from 
musical authorities. And we did enjoy Mr. Hunt and Dr. Thomas in Old Eng- 
lish costume. 

Undergraduates and quite a number of visitors heard the gripping story of 
"The Epic of Mount Everest", as told by Captain John Noel, and illustrated by 
his remarkable stereopticon shdes. But if the Collection portraits grew sober 
at this tale of daring and tragedy, they more than recovered four nights later 
when the lion and the wild kangaroo arrived on the scene. And such a Ham- 
burg Show! From College Band to senior men's chorus it was wild, wonderful, 
and what whoopee ! The star of the evening, by a consensus of opinion includ- 
ing Prexy and the least freshman, was Jim Michener '29, who acted "A Hero" 
from start to finish — and got away with it — all by himself except for Ed Dawes 
'32 at the piano. The Hero graduated from college, got married, left for 
France as a soldier, played around as unoccupied soldiers will, went through a 
battle, was wounded and effected a daring rescue, was discharged honorably and 
sent home to find a young family awaiting his return beyond the Statue of 
Liberty: all this on the Collection stage, and in the space of ten minutes or so. 
A most remarkable feat, it must be admitted ! There were song-and-dance acts, 
sleight of hand, take-offs galore. The whole college was represented on the pro- 
gram — even the brand-new freshmen got their little words in, if a bit edgewise 
to be sure. 

The next night, November twenty-fourth, the co-eds had their innings at 
a dance in the women's gym. They dragged and cut to their heart's content, 
and the co-eds experienced the novel sensation of having to watch the stag line 
with a calculating eye. They bore up extremely well, however, and even acqui- 



esced to the loud clamor for bigger and better co-ed dances. 

With the first of December we lost Professor Day, who left the English 
Department to become the president of Union College. His work was taken 
over by Miss Charlotte Young of Oxford. Swarthmore has been honored with 
quite a visitation from Oxford this year. Besides Miss Young, the Reverend 
Roy Ridley of Baliol was here for a time working with English honor students. 
And beginning in January, A. D. Lindsay, Master of Baliol, delivered a series 
of five weekly lectures on "Conditions of Democracy". 

December was on the whole rather a sad and feeble month, with the stu- 
dents contracting grippe and collapsing right and left. With a final great effort 
they gathered together sufficient vigor to give a rousing cheer for the Phoenix, 
the best college newspaper in the Middle Atlantic competition; another for the 
freshmen, permitted on the thirteenth to remove their battered name-tags; and 
a last one for the public Ijill of the one-act play class, — Ijefore they gave up in 
despair and closed college early, at noon on the fifteenth. 

January stressed the intellectual. Perhaps it was midyears looming on the 
horizon, or the parting advice of fond parents. At any rate, the events on the 
calendar were the Lindsay lectures, Doctor Carl Brinkmann's address on "Post- 
War-Germany", and the Friday morning Manning- Wilcox lectures. The month 
witnessed the funeral of the Portfolio. The Coroner declared the death to be 
due to starvation. Exams consumed an inordinate amount of time — from the 
twenty-first to the twenty-ninth. But they were almost worth the agony for 
the gloriousness of a two-day vacation with nothing in the world to do. We 
cannot leave January without mentioning the announcement of an endowment 
campaign which aims to raise two and a half million dollars. 

For February, the musically inclined conceived the idea of publishing a 
college song-book. It is to contain, Ijesides the favorites, two songs from each 
fraternity, Kwink songs, and several new ones. Perhaps, with a shiny new 
song-book to play with, our musical showing as a college will stand a better 
chance. But musical or not, Swarthmore turns out "en entier" for the Glee 
Club Concert and dance on the eve of Washington's birthday. The concert in 
Collection was a repetition of the one given before in Atlantic City, and later 
at Friends School in Washington. The formal prom of the year was held in 
the dining-rooms, from nine-thirty till one-thirty. Our three-times-daily haunts 
was almost unrecognizaljle, with waxed floors, covered lights, l)alloons, all man- 
ner of futuristic decoration, — even armchairs! And the music was enough to 
keep us dancing unheeding, far into the night. Nearly all those who were 
fortunate enough to have to spend the holiday at college managed to find their 
way to the second formal of the week-end, — the Junior Dance in Bond Me- 
morial, featured by the Garnet Serenaders, cherries, and small pink cakes. 

But February was not all play. Students and faculty learned "What is 
Fascism" from Gaetano Salvemini, and remnants of serious-mindedness were 
testified to, among the women at least, by raising the question: is there a place 
in Swarthmore for women's fraternities? Although the sentiment was in favor 
of keeping the fraternities, the movement did result in some discussion and 
deep thinking, which may do something to remedy the conditions which first 
brought up the issue. 

Is this then all, before another Halcyon marks the end of another year of 
our history? No, one thing more: the Observatory Expedition to Sumatra, which 
left in January. Dr. Miller and Dr. Marriott are engineering the expedition, 
which is going to see the total eclipse of the sun on the ninth of May. It seems 
that this might be taken to express the spirit of this year: learning, progress, 
enjoyment. And so, from Halcyon to Halcyon, Swarthmore goes on.. And the 
best we can wish for her is that years to come may be as happy as has been this 
year of 1928 to 1929. 



41] 




A S 



To hundreds of Swartliniore students of more than three generations, the 
broad ascendhi^ slope of the Asphauhuni has presented the first glimpse of 
their Alma Mater. The tree-bordered stone walk cuts the campus fairly in 
two, and leads from the railroad station in the village of Swarthmore to the wide 
hilltop on which the college buildings are situated. Much tradition and college 
history has centered about this pathway. 

It was once the uncrossable boundary between the two distinct strolling 
grounds where young ladies and gentlemen might walk (separately) in the early 
evening. In more recent years its paved surface has served as a mattress for a 
hundred wrestling participants in the historic poster fight. In summer, groups 
of twos saunter slowly up and down its open passage; and winter finds it no 
less popular as a sledding hill for boys of the village as well as the more playful 
ones of Wharton. 

When one is halfway up the Asphaultum, directly opposite on the eastern 
part of the campus stands the library — its size nearly doubled in the past year 
by the addition of the wing to house the Friends Historical Library. The 
building is a gray stone structure, matching the other buildings on the college 
grounds. It is surmounted by a large clock tower that chimes out over the 
campus every quarter-hour. Inside the structure are a large reading room, sev- 
eral seminar rooms for honors students, and the stacks. Nearly 65,000 volumes 
are contained in the college libraries. The Friends Library Wing houses many 
interesting and valuable relics of Friendly history, as well as important books 
and essays on the activities of the society. 

Between the library and Chester Road, which has many of its own stories 
to be told, is the Benjamin West House, still on the site where it was first 
erected in 1724. This was the birthplace and home of the famous American 
portrait painter of Revolutionary days, and is now used as a residence for per- 
sons connected with the college. 

At the top of the long gradual ascent from the town, facing down the 



42 




the CampMS 



Aspliaultum and out over the Delaware River valley, are the halls of Parrish. 
This is in reality the College Building — its long ivy-covered walls matching the 
dignity of its standing. A central section upholding a towering dome houses 
the administration offices, class rooms, the dining room, and historic Collection 
Hall. The wings hold the women's dormitories in the upper floors, and lecture 
rooms helow. 

College activity centers in and about this building. The great solemn 
quakers whose portraits hang on Collection's walls have watched an endless 
procession of lectures, plays, motion pictures, meetings, elections, and even exam- 
inations. Its roof has echoed both the polite applause of weekly Collection 
gatherings and the roaring approval of mass mieetings and Hamburg Shows. 

Parrish's dining room is the daily scene of healthy and happy activity 
despite a great deal of good-natured grumbling and an abundance of pushing 
and shoving at the doorway. The basement post office and the Pet also figure 
prominently in college lore, not to mention the serviceable lecture halls which 
do double duty as class rooms by day and social parlors by night. 

Flanking Parrish, a short distance beyond each of the front corners, are 
the Somerville gymnasium for women and the Sproul Observatory. In this 
latter structure is the thirty-six foot telescope which has been used in making 
many important astronomical observations. From this observatory, also, five 
eclipse expeditions have gone out into the far parts of the world carrying 
Swarthmore's fame as a leader in astronomical activity. 

Nearby, at the ridge of the hill, on the open lawn, is an iron tablet im- 
bedded in cement to mark the spot where Woodrow Wilson, President of the 
United States, stood when he addressed the students and friends of the college 
at the Founders' Day exercises of 1913. His words spoken on that occasion — 
"Do not forget as you walk these classic places . . . you are here to enrich the 
world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget the errand" — are now nation- 



[43 




Friends' Historical Library 



ally known and preserved." 
At the observatory 
ends the crooked walk — 
variously known as the 
"cow path" and the "cock- 
eyed walk" — reserved for 
the private use of first year 
men in their daily trips to 
and from Parrish. From 
here the straight path leads 
to Wharton Hall, the men's 
dormitory. This is the resi- 
dence of some two hundred 
young fellows, all wanting 
to have a good time, all 
wanting to do some study- 
ing, and all doing the 
things at different times. It 
is no wonder that the 
broad quadrangle has seen 
many strange and interesting sights. 

The building is divided into six sections, each of which has its own ideals 
and codes of conduct. Down the hill a short distance are the lodges of the 
five national men's fraternities. Two of these are already connected by a 
cloister, and all will be so linked after the two remaining lodges are constructed. 

Behind Wharton runs the campus avitomobile road, which because of tlie 
Board of Managers' decree regarding "the maintenance and operation of auto- 
mobiles at Swarthmore" is allowed to fall into disrepair. Just beyond the first 
turn in this road is the Magill open air auditorium where the senior and junior 
plays are given and where commencement is held in favorable weather. The 
road passes this, touches the side door of Parrish, passes the Hall gymnasium 
for men, and circles the Engineering and Science Buildings. Of this group. 
Hicks Hall and the Chemistry Building stand out as headquarters for students 
in two of the leading college departments. 

The Bartol Founda- 
tion of the Franklin Insti- 1 
tute has in the past year ^' 
erected a new building in 
the science group, where 
graduate research in 
Physics is to be pursued. 
This building is erected on 
a special foundation, is 
completely insulated, and 
contains many delicate 
pieces of apparatus built 
independent of the build- 
ing foundations which will 
be used in important scien- 
tific experiments. 

Whittier Field and 
Alumni Field, the grounds 
for all men's outdoor 
sports except soccer, are 





Bartol Research Laboratory 



^^ 



"441 




The Observatoiy at Night 



situated opposite the science build- 
ings. Here, in addition to the reg- 
ular home contests in football, base- 
ball, etc., the annual Alumni Day 
exercises are held, as are the Swarth- 
more Interscholastic Track Meets. 

Beyond the Bartol building, the 
college road divides — the right fork 
leading -to the professors' residences 
and the Alumni gates — the other 
passing on to Whittier House and the 
Friends Meeting. In the assembly 
room of the former many interesting 
lectures of the Forum and other 
organizations are given for the bene- 
fit of students and villagers. Within 
the somber walls of the Meeting 
House may be found the peace of 
daily and Sunday meetings for those 
of Friendly faith or sympathy. 
Swarthmore College is itself of 
Friendly origin and tradition and it 
is fitting that the Swarthmore Meet- 
ing House should be situated on its 
campus. 

Across from the meeting house and near the College gateway is the 
Students Observatory, equipped with telescopes and a seismograph for instruc- 
tion purposes. This is the residence of the Professor of Mathematics. 

In the eastern corner of the college ground close to the intersection of 
College Avenue and Chester Road is the Worth Dormitory for Senior and 
Junior women. This building consists of six connected cottages and has an 
open court. Joined to it are the lodges of the women's fraternities, recently 
erected and dedicated. 

Bond Memorial Hall, which forms a corner unit of the Worth Quadrangle, 
is the last building that has been completed on the campus for purely under- 
graduate use. The structure contains a large living room, committee rooms, 
and a kitchen; and in its tower provides accommodations for college guests. 
It is a social center for women's activities, having proved popular as a hall for 
college dances, and for many informal lectures and debates. 

Although Swarthmore's campus is entirely connected and contiguous, it 
is pleasantly varied. A large grassy lawn on the front slope before Parrish — 
many shaded walks between educational and social buildings — the cool wood- 
lands of Crum Creek valley — all afford many enjoyable changes of environ- 
ment from the visual scenes of scholastic work. The campus is indeed one of 
the features that make Swarthmore the desirable place that it is. 



[45] 



■ ■T < h «. *ti ^- ---tJ;g» % - . , ^ 




(46] 




€M^tsi 



I 



^3eS5;Bl3 





I 46 J 




[48] 



PA^ 




FIRST SEMESTER 

President 
Walter Seibert 

Vice-President 
Elizabeth Ogden 

Secretary 
Marion Collins 

Treasurer 
Thomas Sharpies 



Secretary President Vici-1'ii'^iikiit Treasurer 



cers 



SECOND 
SEMESTER 

President 
Thomas Hallowell 

Vice-President 
Caroline Robinson 

Secretary 
Eleanor Powell 

Treasurer 
Will McLain III. 




Vice-President President Treasurer Secretary 



[49] 



f 






CHRISTIAN BERT ADELMAN, AY 
3709 Military Road, Washington, D. C. 

Mechanical Engineering 

McKinley Technical High School. Soccer Sqnad 
(I) ; Varsity (II, III) ; Captain (IV) ; Basketball 
Squad (I, II, III, IV) ; Varsity Baseball (I, II, 
III); Captain (IV); Varsity Club (I, II, III); 
Vice-president (IV) ; Engineers Club; Student 
Branch, A. S. M. E.; Chairman (IV) ; Chairman 
Phoenix Advisory Board (IV); Class President 
(III-2) ; Glee Club (III, IV). Little Theatre Club; 
Hamburg Show (I, II, III, IV). 



MARY KATHRYN ANDERS, $M 
1118 West Airy Street, Norristown, Pa. French 
Norristown High School. Photographic Editor 
Halcyon (111); Le Cercle Francaise (III, IV). 



DAVID J. ANDERSON 
Blue Church Road, Springfield, Pa. Social Science 
Swarthmore High School. Phoenix (1. 11, III); 
News Editor (IV) : Publicity Committee (I, H) ; 
Chairman (III, IV) ; Pi Delta Epsilon. 



MARY ANDERSON, AF 

2013 N. 7th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mathematics Honors 

Germantown High School. Chorus (I) ; May 
Day (ID ; Class Show (I, II, III, IV) ; Hamburg 
Show (IV) ; Freshman Advisory Committee (III) ; 
Class Hockey ( 1. II. II. IV ) : Class Basketball 
(I, II, HI) ; Class Swimming (I, II) ; Dance Com- 
mittee (II); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Coranto; 
Gwimp; Mortar Board; Old English "S"; Phoe- 
nix Staff; Little Theater Club. 



MILTON JOB ATKINSON, $2K 
116 Button wood Street, Mt. Holly, N. J. 

English Honors 

Mount Holly (N. J.) High School. Freshman De- 
bate (I) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (H, HI) ; President 
(IV); Editor-in-chief. 1929 Halcyon; Class Trea- 
surer (III-2) ; Pi Delta Epsilon; Book and Key. 



HOWARD ALISON BAKER 
18 N. Rigby Avenue, Lansdowne. Pa. 

Social Science Honors 

Lansdowne High School. 











CURTIS LYON BARNES, ^KW 
6680 Lincoln Drive, Mount Airy, Pa. Economics 
Germantown High School. Soccer (I, II) ; Foot- 
ball (IL IIL IV); Baseball fL HL IV); "S" 
Club; Sophomore Vigilance Committee; Fresh- 
man Basketball. 



MERCY REBECCA BICKNELL 
Oxford, Pa. Mathematics 

Oxford Hish School. Class Hockey (II, III, IV) ; 
Class Archerv a, H, IH, IV); Class Shows (I, 
II, III); Chorus (Illl 



ALBERT ENGLES BLACKBURN, JR., KS 
3813 Powelton Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

English Honors 

Friends Central School. Phoenix Staff (I, II, 
III) ; Associate Editor (IV) ; Halcyon Staff (III) ; 
Little Theatre Club (I, H, III) ;President (LV) ; 
Hamburg Show (IV) ; Pi Delta Epsilon; Chairman 
Junior-Senior Play Committee (IV). 



PHILIP CONKLIN BLACKBURN. Wharton Club 
434 Central Park West, N. Y. C. English Honors 
DeWitt Clinton High School, New Y'ork City. 
Hamburg Show (II) ; Chorus and Orchestra (IL 
in, I\') ; Manager (H, HL LV) ; Glee Club (LV). 



REBECCA BLACKBURN, KKU 
Bedford, Pa. English 

Bedford High School. 



JULIA MERRILL BLAINE, KKT 
209 Market Street, Pocomoke, Md. English 






[51] 








ROBERTA BOAK, 
1110 Pennsylvania Avenue, 

Oakmont, Allegheny Co., Pa. 

Freshman Commission (II) ; Classical Club (I, 
II, III, IV) ; Class Secretary (III) ; May Day 
(III); Hamburg Show (IV); Halcyon Staff (HI). 



MARION LILLIAN BONNER, AP 
303 Highland Avenue, Kutztown, Pa. English 

Kutztown High School. Chorus (I) ; May Day 
a. III) ; Class Shows (L H, III, IV) ; Hamburg 
Show (IV) ; Freshman Advisory Committee (II) ; 
Class Archery Team (III) ; Manager of Archery 
(IV) ; Secretary of A. A. Council (II) ; President 
of A. A. (IV) ; Y. W. C. A. Finance (II) ; Assis- 
tant Fire Captain (II) ; Fire Captain of Parrish 
(III-l). 



ELINOR BRECHT, AF 

539 George Street, Norristown, Pa. German 

Norristown High School. Hamburg Show (I, II) ; 
May Day (II) ; Chorus (I, II, III, IV) ; Y. W. C. 
A.; I. C. S. A. Committee (11, III) ; Treasurer 
(HI) ; Vice-president (IV) ; Class Archery (III) ; 
Mortar Board; German Club, President (III, LV). 



MARLON ELIZABETH BROUGHER 
Wellsville, Pa. French Honors 

A.B., Hood College. 1928. 



THOMAS McPHERSON BROWN, <1>K^I' 
1622 29th Street, Washington, D. C. 

Physiology-Zoology Honors 
Washington Central High School. M. S. G. A. 
President (IV-1) ; Class Treasurer (II-l) ; Man- 
ager Football (IV); Tennis (L H) ; Varsity (IH, 
IV); Omicron Omega. Glee Club r 1. II. IV): 
College Quartet (H, IV) ; Opera (III, IV) ; Col- 
lege Orchestra (III, IV) ; Endowment Committee 
(IV); Kwink; Sigma Xi; Book and Key. 



ELEANOR STEWART BURCH, AAT 
5208 Drexel Road, Philadelphia, Pa. English 

West Philadelphia High School for Girls. Phoe- 
nix Staff (L n. III) ; Feature Editor (IV) ; May 
Day Committee (II) ; L C. S. A. (I) ; Y. W. C. A. 
Undergraduate Representative Committee (III) ; 
Bond Hall Tea Committee (HI) ; Honor Cpni- 
miltee (III, IV) ; Coranto; Interclass Archery 
(IV); Intercollegiate Archery Meet (FV). 









JAMES BURGETT BURR, K2 
402 Linden Avenue, Riverton, N. J. 

Political Science 
Palmyra High School. Soccer Squad (I) ; Varsity 
(III, IV) ; Basketball Squad (I) ; Varsity (IV) ; 
Baseball Squad (I, II); Varsity (III; IV); Class 
Treasurer (II-2) ; President Athletic Association 
(IV) ; Interfraternity Council (III, IV) ; Chair- 
man Senior Dance Committee; Varsity <_ilul»: 
Kwink; Book and Key. 

JOSEPH DUKES CALHOUN, *KW 
500 Mohawk Avenue, Norwood, Pa. 

Social Science Honors 
Glen Nor High School. Debating (I, II, IIL IV) ; 
Forum (H, HI) ; Secretary (III) ; President (IV) ; 
Band (H, III); Delta Sigma Rho; Glee Club (H, 
HI) ; Potter Prize Contest (II) ; President Hoover 
Club; Halcyon Staff; Hamburg Show (IV) ; Man- 
ager Men's Debate (IV). 



LINDA ALICE CHANDLER, XQ 
1008 Juniata Avenue, AUentown, Pa. Mathematics 
Allentown High School. Y. W. C. A., Secretary 
(II) ; Undergraduate Representative (III) ; Pres- 
ident (IV) ; Phoenix Staff (I, II, III) ; Associate 
Editor (IV) ; Secretary Phoenix Advisory Board 
(IV) ; Class vice-president (HI) ; Somerville 
Treasurer (II) ; Junior Month Delegate (HI) ; 
Class Archery (HI) ; Hamburg Show (ID ; Glee 
Club (I); May Day (I); Little Theatre Clu6; 
Treasurer (IV) ; Coranto; Mortar Board. 



ELIZABETH CLACK, KAO 
532 Second Avenue, Havre, Mont. 



Historv 



Student Government (I) ; Freshman Commis- 
sion (II) ; Vice-president Class (II) ; Hamburg 
Show (II, IH, IV) ; Glee Club (I) ; May Day (I, 
II) ; Gwimp (HI) ; Manager Hockey (IV) ; Chair- 
man Somerville Day (IV). 



MYER COHEN, JR. 

Wharton Club 
1868 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

Social Science Honors 
Central High School, Washington. D. C. Tennis 
Squad (I, II) ; Varsity (III, IV) ; Freshman De- 
bate (1) ; Halcyon Staff (III) ; Interfraternity 
Council (IH, IV) . 



PHILIP ELIE COLEMAN, 02 H 

Swarthmore, Pa. Economics 

Swarthmore High School. Phoenix Staff (I, II, 
111) ; Editor-in-chief (IV) ; Pi Delta Epsilon. 






[53] 








WALTER BARTON COLEMAN 

Wharton Club 
22 East 89th Street, N. Y. C. Economics 

Lincoln School, New York City. Track Squad 
(II, III, IV); Glee Club, (I, IV); Chorus (U, 
III, IV); Orchestra fll. III, IV). 



OLIVER HAMMOND COLES, $2K 
35 Bowen Avenue, Woodstown, N. J. Botany 

Woodstown (N. J.) High School. Phoenix Staff 
(I, II, III) ; Advertising Manager (IV) ; Business 
Manager, Freshman Handbook (III) ; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet (II) ; Vice-president (III) ; Treasurer 
(IV); Little Theatre Club; Trotter Biological So- 
ciety; Pi Delta Epsilon. 



MARION HANNAH COLLINS, KKF 
Sleepy Hollow Farm, Merchantville, N. J. 

English 

Class Hockey (II, III, IV) ; Class Secretary 

(IV). 



HORACE FENELON DARLINGTON, *A0 
Pocopson, Pa. Biology 

West Chester High School. Debate (I, II, III) ; 
Frosh-Soph Debate (I) ; Track (I, II) ; Glee Club 
(11, III, IV) ; 1929 Halcyon Staff; Hamburg Show 
(IV) ; Chorus-Opera (III, IV) ; Trotter Biological 
Society (II, III, IV) ; President (IV). 



ROBERT GATES DAWES, *K^ 
5004 Penn Street, Frankford, Pa. English 

Frankford High School. Glee Club (II, III) ; In- 
strumental Club (II, HI, V) ; College Band (II) ; 
Hamburg Show (II, III) ; Feature Editor 1929 
Halcyon; Senior Play Committee. 



WILLIAM WESLEY DELANEY, *A0 
601 West Lockhart Street, Sayre, Pa. 

Chemical Engineering 
Football Squad (I) ; Lacrosse (I, II, III, FV) ; 
Treasurer Engineers Club (III) ; Sigma Tau. 



ISHBf 






girmsfj^r ^^t^BBm 



f, 






HOWARD MORTIMER DRAKE, $2K 
225 Elm Street, Edgewood, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Political Science 

Edgewood High School. Little Theatre Club, 
Plays (III, IV) ; Freshman Basketball; Junior 
Varsity Basketball (II, III, IV); Athletic Coun- 
cil (IV) ; Intertraternity Council (III) ; President 
(IV) ; Phoenix Staff (I, II) ; Debating Team (II) ; 
Hamburg Show (IV); Varsity Club; Lacrosse 
Manager. M.S.G.A. Executive Committee (IV-2). 



LOUISE V. EATON, AAT 
105 South Street, Harrisburg, Pa. French 

Central High School, Harrisburg, Pa. Class 
Hockey (II, IV) ; May Day (III) ; Assistant Cos- 
tumer for College Opera (III, IV). 



JAMES DOWNEY EGLESON, 02 H 
Essex Fells, N. J. Engineering Honors 

Ridley Park High School. Football (II, HI); 
Lacrosse (II, HI) ; Sigma Xi; Sigma Tau. 



CATHERINE H. EMHARDT, HB* 
51 Westview Avenue, Germantown, Pa. 
Germantown High School. 






OLIVE OSGOOD FILER, nB$ 

109 N- 5th Street, Camden, N. J. 

Northwestern University. Varsity Swimming (II, 
III IV) ; Captain (IV) ; May Day (II, III) ; Ham- 
burg Show (IV); Debate (HI, IV). 



ANNE CAROLYN FORSTNER. KKF 
918 Fillmore Street, Philadelphia, Pa. English 
Frankford High School. Chairman of Student 
Building Fund; Hamburg Shows; May Day (I, 
III) ; Halcyon Staff, Secretary of Little Theatre 
Club; President of Coranto. 




[55] 



MARY ELIZABETH GEORGE, AF 

Amesbur> Road. Haverhill, Mass. English Honors 
Haverhill High School. 



JANE PERRY GRIEST, AT 
Barnesboro. Pa. Education 

Barnesboro High School. May Day: Hamburg 
Show. 



MARION MILLICENT HALL, XQ 
6006 33rd Street, Washington, D. C. 

English Honors 
Central High School. Debate (I. ID : Class 
Swimming (III; Portfolio ( IL IIL IV): Halcyon 
(IIIi; Hamburg Show (IIIi; Soraerville Commit- 
tee; Corresponding Secretary (III): Publicity 
Committee Y. W. C. A.: Philosophy Club: Eng- 
lish Club; Little Theatre Club; Coranto: Trainer, 
Conduct, and Executive Committees; Mascot. Glee 
Club. 




HOWARD THOMAS BLALLOWELL, AY 
300 Summit Avenue, Jenkintown. Pa. Economics 
Wra. Penn Charter School. Glee Club QHl : 
Football Squad (I) : Yarsity (II. III. TV) ; Varsity 
Club. Secretarv and Treasurer (III) ; Lacrosse 
Squad (L II) ; Varsity (;IIL R") ; Interfraternity 
Council (III. IV) : Secretarv and Treasurer (FS^) ; 
Class President (II-2. T\~-2) ; Kwink; Book and 
Key. 



DONALD MYERS HAMILTON. 02 H 
213 Trites Avenue. Norwood. Pa. Biology Honors 
Glen-Nor High School. Tennis Squad ( IL III) ; 
Hamburg Show (IV) ; Glee Club fl. II. IIL IV) ; 
Phoenix (I, II): Trotter BioloHical Society (IV 
Interfraternity Council (III, W). 



MARION COMLEY" HARRIS. KA0 
Moylan.Rose Aalley, Pa. English Honors 

Swarthmore High School. Class Secretarv I II ) ; 
Class Hockev ( I. II. HI) : Class Basketball fl. 
II) ; Class Shows (I. IL IIL FS'i ; Hamburg Show 
(L H, IIL IV I : Little Theatre Play ( II i : Dance 
Committee (ILL III-l i ; Freshman Commission 
(II); May Day (1. U. HI); Assistant Business 
Manager 1929 Halcyon; Student Conduct Commit- 
tee (IV); Coranto: Philosophy Club: English 
Club (TV): Treasurer (IV I : Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil (III). 







MALCOLM HODGE, K2 
321 S. 46th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. Economics 
West Philadelphia High School. Business Man- 
ager of Halcyon (III) ; Pi Delta Epsilon; Kwink; 
Glee Club (IV) Hamburg Show (IV). 



AGNES LAWSON HOOD, KA0 
147 Sumac Street, Wissahickon, Pa. History 

Germantown Friends' School. Freshman Show; 
President of Somerville (IV) ; Class Hockey (I, 
II) ; Glee Club (I) ; Chorus (II, III) ; May Queen 
Attendant (L HI). 



ELIZABETH INGRAM HOOPES, HB* 
Avondale, Pa. 
Kennett Square High. May Day (I) ; Freshman 
Show (I); Hamburg Show (II). 



ANNA WALTON HULL 
3510 Duval Street, Baltimore, Md. Education 

Class Basketball (I, II); Captain (III); Basket- 
ball Squad (I) ; Class Hockey a, IL HI, IV) ; 
Hockey Squad (III); Athletic Council (IL IV); 
Mav Day (I, III) ; English "S" (Junior Blazer) ; 
Chorus (IL in, IV). 



BERTHA BROOMELL HULL, Xfi 
2630 Lyndhui-st Ave, Baltimore. Md. Histor> 

Glee Club (I); Portfolio (H, IH, IV); Hal- 
cyon (HI); German Club (IH, IV); Freshman 
Advisory Committee (HI); Coranto (III, IV). 






ALICE HUTCHINSOIN 

154 Westervelt Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. English 
Glee Club (I) ; Chorus (II, III, IV) ; Librarian 
(IV) ; Mav Day (I, III) ; Class Swimming (IV) ; 
Class Hockev (I, IV) ; Student Building Fund 
Committee (II) ; Student Conduct Committee 
(III) ; Y. W. C. A. R"1igious Committee (IV) , 
Employment Bureau (IV). 



PAUL MARSHALL JAMES, *2K 
4823 Warrington Avenue, W. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Physiology-Zoology 

Friends' Central School, Philadelphia, Pa. Foot- 
ball Squad (II, HI) ; Varsity (IV) ; Freshman Bas- 
ketball; Lacrosse Squad (H, III, IV) ; Trotter Bio- 
logical Society. 






GEORGE HAY KAIN, JR., #A0 
45 Springettsbury Place, York, Pa. 

Social Science Honors 

York Collegiate Institute, Mercersburg Academy. 
Frosh-Soph Debate (I) ; Freshmen Debate Team 
(I) ; Varsity Debate (I. H, IV) ; Winner Potter 
Speaking Contest (II) ; Swarthmore College Chest 
Committee (IH, IV), Chairman (IV); Swimming 
Squad (1, II). 



JULIA ANN KEHEW, KAe 
Bradford Woods, Pa. History 

Allegheny High School. Archery Team (I, II. 
IV); Chorus (H, IV). 



PARKER KING 
Williamsport, Pa. Engineering 

Williamsport High School. Photographic Editor 
of 1929 Halcyon; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Vice-pres- 
ident Y. M. C. A.; Glee Club: (I, 11, III) ; Mana- 
ger (IV) ; Omicron Omega. 



LOUIS LAUBACH KUMPF, *2K 

30 Union St., Mt. Holly, N. J. Political Science 
Mount Holly (N. J.) High School; Soccer Squad 
(III, IV); Basketball Squad (I, II, IH, IV) ; Jun- 
ior Dance Committee; Hamburg Show (TV) ; Busi- 
ness Manager, One Act Plays (IV) ; Little Theatre 
Club Play (IV) ; Phoenix Staff (I, II) ; Assis- 
tant Business Manager, 1929 Halcyon; Pi Delta 
Epsilon. 





[58] 






HELEN LARZELERE, *M 
25 Harwood Avenue, Upper Darby, Pa. French 
Upper Darby High School. Freshman Advisory 
Committee (H) ; Portfolio Business Staff (H) ; 
Business Manager (IH) ; Le Cercle Francois; 
Coranto; Student Conduct Committee (ni-2) ; 
Class Basketball Team (I, IH) ; Class Hockey (I, 
111) ; Eaglesmere Student Government Delegate 
(II); Pan-Hellenic Council, President (IV) ; Vice- 
president Athletic Council (III) ; Class Vice-pres- 
ident (III-2) ; 1929 Halcyon General Staff. 



WILLIAM E. LEDNUM, JR. 

Wharton Chih 
Eastern Maryland, Md. Political Science Major 

Eastern Maryland High School. Soccer Squad 
(TV) : Lacrosse (L II) ; Glee Club (IL IIL IV) ; 
Hamburg Show (I). 



MORRIS MATTHEWS LEE, JR., $2K 
College and Princeton Avenues. Swarthmore. Pa. 

English Honors 
Swarthmore High School. Tennis Squad (I, II, 
IH, IV) . 



ANNE LEFEVER. KKT 
317 S. 46th Street. Philadelphia, Pa. English 

West Philadelphia High School for Girls. Glee 
Club Accompanist (I, II) ; Student Council (III) : 
President I. C. S. A. (IV) ; Class Hockey (TV) ; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (IV) ; Chorus Accompanist 
(HI) ; Accompanist for "Hugh the Drover" (IV); 
Freshman Advisory Committee (IV) . 



JOHN FRANCIS McBRIDE, K2 
66 Hartley Road, Lansdowne, Pa. Economics 

West Philadelphia High School. Varsity Soccer 
a. n, IH, rV) ; Phoenix Staff (L IL HI) ; Busi- 
ness Manager (IV) ; Kwink; Hamburg Show (HI, 
IV) ; Glee Club (IH, IV) ; Pi Delta Epsilon. 



WILBUR MORRIS McFEELY, K2 
76 Bryn Ma^vr Avenue, Lansdo^vne, Pa. Economics 
West Philadelphia High School. Football Squad 
a) ; Varsity (II, IH, IV) ; Captain (IV) ; Baseball 
Squad (I) ; Varsity (H, HI, IV) ; M. S. G. A. (IIL 
IV) ; Secretary (HI) ; President (IV-2) ; Class 
President (I-l) ; Book and Key. 









ARTHUR McGILL 
Elkins Park, Pa. Social Science Honors 

Sheltenham High School. Transferred from 
Brown University. Football Squad (HI) ; Track 
(HI). 



HORACE McGUIRE, AY 

513 N. Williams Street, Dayton, O. Economics 

Steele High School, Dayton. Fresliman Foot- 
ball; Varsity (II, III, IV) ; Basketball Varsity (I, 
II, III); Baseball Varsity (I, H, III, IV); Class 
President (1-2) ; Student Government Executive 
Committee (III-l, III-2) ; Book and Key. 



WILL McLAIN, 3rd, $A0 
5860 Bartlett Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Political Science 

Kiski School. Football Squad (I, II) ; Varsity 
IV); Swimming Squad (L ID; Baseball Squad 
(I, II, III) ; Lacrosse Squad (IV) ; Class President 
(III-l); Class Treasurer (IV-2); Glee Club (III, 
IV) ; Instrumental Club (HI) ; Varsity Club; Port- 
folio Business Staff (I, II) ; Chairman Table Com- 
mittee (IV). 



1 

^ 




MARY MARTIN MAGRUDER, HB* 
6202 Walnut Lane, Cedarcroft, Baltimore, Md. 

Mathematics 

Bryn Mawr School for Girls. Freshman Show 
(I); Class Hockey (I); Hamburg Show (IL HI, 
rV) ; Gwimp (III) ; Chairman Employment Com- 
mittee (III). 



FRANK HARRISON MARTIN, K2 
5307 Woodbine Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. English 
West Philadelphia High School. Freshman Ten- 
nis Team; Editor Freshman Handbook (III); 
Junior Editor of Halcyon (III) ; Phoenix Staff (I, 
II III) ; News Editor (IV) ; Track Squad (II. III. 
IV) ; Vice-president Y. M. C. A. (HI. IV) ; Dele- 
gate to Eagles Mere Conference (HI); Pi Delta 
Epsilon. 






WALTER ALLEN MUIR, *2K 
141 Warren Avenue, Wollaston, Mass. Economics 
Liberty High School, Bethlehem, Pa. Glee Club 
(H, III) ; Band (IL IH, IV) ; Lacrosse Squad (L 
II). 



EVARISTO MURRAY 

50 Barrow Street, N. Y. C. Philosophy Honors ^ 

Friends' Seminarv, New York City. Portfolio 
Staff (I, n, HI); Editor-in-chief (IV). 



ALICE ROBERTA NORTON 
1420 Washington Avenue, Chester, Pa. 

Greek Honors 
Chester High School. Classical Club (I, HI) ; 
Secretary-Treasurer (HI) ; Vice-president (IV) ; 
Class Hockey (III). 



ELIZABETH MORTON OGDEN, HB* 
1003 Park Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. English 

George School. Class Secretary (II-l) ; May Day 
(1); Attendant (III); Table Committee (L H, 
HI) ; Chairman (IV) ; Freshman Commission; 
English Club (IL HI) ; President (IV) ; Lambda 
Eta (II, III, IV) ; Student Conduct Committee 
(III-l); Athletic Editor Halcyon 1929; Hamburg 
Show (II); Coranto (III); Vice-president (IV); 
Treasurer of Women's Student Government Asso- 
ciation (IV); Class Vice-president (IV-1). 



CORA ELIZABETH PALMENBERG, KKF 

Spring Valley, N. Y. German 

Spring Valley High School. Class Hockey (I, 
HI, IV) ; Varsity Swimming (III) ; Class Basket- 
ball (II, HI, IV) ; Assistant Swimming Manager 
(III) ; Swimming Manager (IV) ; Gwimp; Coran- 
to; Circulation Manager of Phoenix; W. S. G. A. 
Honor Committee (IL HI) ; Y. W. C. A. Social 
Committee (III, IV) ; Finance Committee (II) ; 
Feature Editor of Halcyon; Hamburg Show (II, 
IV) ; German Club. 



GERTRUDE KERVEY PAXSON, HB* 

302 S. Walnut Street, West Chester, Pa. English 
May Day (I, HI) ; Freshman Show; Staff, 1929 
Halcyon; Class Secretary (HI) ; Class Archery 
(III) ; Chairman, Dance Committee (IV) ; Ham- 
burg Show (II, IV) ; 






61 



f, 






MARY ELIZABETH PEARSON 

105 Sabine Avenue, Narberth, Pa. English 

West Philadelphia High School. Class Hockey 
(I, H, HI, IV) ; Class Basketball (I, II, III) ; Class 
Shows (I, II); Hamburg Show (I, II); May Day 
(I, III) ; Committee (I) ; Opera Executive Direc- 
tor (HI) ; Coach (IV) ; Chairman Song Book 
Committee (IV). 



ELEANOR F. POWELL. UBI' 
-1223 165th Street, Flushing, N. Y. English 

Glee Club (I) ; Hamburg Show (I, II, IV) ; 
Freshman Show, Woman Student Building Com- 
mittee (II) ; Swimming Squad (II) ; Varsity 
Swimming Team (III, IV) ; Class Hockey (II) ; 
Vice-president Somerville (III). 



FRED JACKSON POWELL, $A0 

4223-165th Street, Flushing, N. Y. 

General Engineering 
Flushing High School. Baseball Squad (I) ; Soc- 
cer Squad (II); Track Squad (III); Engineers 
Club; A. S. C. E. 



ELIZABETH WHITE REYNOLDS 

518 N. Jackson Street, Media, Pa. 

Physiology-Zoology 
George School. Trotter Biological Society (I, 
III, IV) ; May Day (I). 



WILLIAM M. RICE, GSH 
1313 S. Boston Avenue, Tulsa, Okla. 

Social Science Honors 

University of Nebraska. 



CHARLES THORNE RICKER, AY 

46 Fairview Place, Phillipsburg, N. J. Biology 

Phillipsburg High School. Assistant Cheerleader 
(IV) ; Band (II, III, IV) ; Manager (III) ; Leader 
(IV) ; Omicron Omega (III, IV) ; Trotter Biolo- 
gical Society (IIL IV). 







:^j 



162] 







MARY HOOTON ROBERTS KA0 
S. Church Street, Moorestown, N. J. 

English Honors 

Varsity Hockey (I, H, IH, IV) ; Freshman Show, 
Hamburg Show; Vice-president of Forum (IV). 



HELEN CAROLINE ROBISON, XQ 
Lansdowne, Pa. French 

Liberty High SchooL Bethlehem, Pa. Class 
Hockey Team (L IL HL IV) ; Class Basketball 
(I, H) ; Varsity (II) ; May Day (1, III) ; May 
Queen Attendant (II) ; Winner of Junior Sweater; 
Assistant Manager of Hockey (III) ; Gwimp; Glee 
Club (I) ; Le Cercle Francais; Little Theatre Club; 
Hamburg Show (I, II, IH, IV) ; Class Vice-presi- 
dent (I) ; Secretary of W. S. G. A.; Freshman Ad- 
viser; President W. S. G. A.; Mortar Board. 



HENRY BOWMAN SEAMAN, JR 
AY 
363 Grand Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Economics 
Brooklyn Friends' School. Soccer Team (III) ; 
Freshman Basketball (I) ; Glee Club (III) ; Man- 
ager of Track (IV). 



WALTER RAYMOND SEIBERT, K2 
7415 Bond Avenue, Bywood, Pa. Mathematics 

West Philadelphia High School. Soccer Squad 
(L HI) ; Varsity (IL IV) ; Manager Basketball 
(IV) ; Y- M. C. A. Cabinet (II) ; Chairman Junior 
Dance Committee (III) ; Class President (IV-1) ; 
Varsity Club; Kwink. 



RALPH STRYKER SELOVER, #A0 
1165.St. Johns Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Electrical Engineering 

Alexander Hamilton High School. Engineers 
Club; Glee Club (IH, IV); Soccer Squad (II); 
Track Squad (II) ; Tennis Squad (L H, HL IV) ; 
Hamburg Show (IV) ; Halcyon Staff. 



VICTOR RUSSELL SELOVER, $A0 
1165 St. Johns Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Engineering 
Alexander Hamilton High School. Glee Club 
(IH, IV); Soccer Squad (II); Tennis Squad (L 
II. IIL IV). 












63 






THOMAS PHILLIP SHARPLES, AY 
510 Forest Road, Roland Park, Md. Economics 

Glee Club (L II. III. IV) ; Omicion Omega (HI. 
IV) ; Varsitv Lacrosse ( H. HI. IV) ; Captain (IV) : 
Varsity Basketball Squad (HI, IV) ; Varsity Club 
(HI, IV) ; President (IV) ; Class Treasurer 
(IV-1) ; Athletic Council (IV) ; Hamburg Show 
(II, III, IV). 

DOROTHY SHOEMAKER, AF 
82 Eastern Avenue, Takoma, D. C. 

Political Science 

Central High School. Class Secretary (1-2) ; Sec- 
retary Executive Board W. S. G. A. (Ill) ; Chair- 
man Student Conduct (IV); Little Theatre Club; 
Manager Basketball; Hamburg Show (II. HI, IV) ; 
Gwimp; Freshman Commission (II) ; May Day (1, 
III) ; Student Building Fund Committee; Fresh- 
man Show; Pan-Hellenic Council (III. IV). 



DANIEL FOX SMITH, Wharton Club 
19 N. Main Street, Medford, N. J. English 

Mount Holly High Scliool. 



HAROLD EDWARD SNYDER, #A0 
2352 W. McMicken Avenue, Cincinnati, 0. 

Social Science Honors 
Hughes High School. Manager of Soccer; Glee 
Club (I, II, III, IV) ; Omicron Omega; Varsity 
Club; Freshman Basketball; Freshman Debate. 



HAROLD ELAM SNYDER, 02 H 
109 Cliff Terrace, Wyncote, Pa. 

Social Science Honors 
Northeast High School. Basketball Squad (I, 
II) ; Manager of Baseball (IV) ; Track Squad (I) ; 
Associate-Editor of 1929 Halcyon; Secretary-Trea- 
surer Y. M. C. A. (HI) ; Secretary (IV) ; Glee 
Club (II, III, IV) ; Hamburg Show (I, IV) ; Pi 
Delta Epsilon; Omicron Omega; Kwink. 

DONOVAN BOUCHER SPANGLER. *A0 
319 Lafayette Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Electrical Engineering Honors 
Swarthmore High School. Soccer Squad (I, II) ; 
Basketball Squad (I, ID ; Track Squad (I, II, 
HI, IV) ; Secretary (III-2) ; Vice-president (IV-1) ; 
Medal (I, II) ; Sigma Xi; Engineers Club (L IL 
HI, IV) ; Secretary (III-l) ; Vice-president (IV) : 
President (IV-2) ; Member of Swarthmore Branch 
of A. I E. E. 






64] 




MARTHA JEANNETTE STAUFFER. *M 
1516 N. Second Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mathematics Honors 
Handbook: Business Manager, Editor; Auditor, 
Student Government. 



SOPHIE MATHILDE STERN 
1524 N. 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. English 

Philadelphia High School for Girls. May Day 
(T, HI) ; College Chorus (II, III, IV) ; Student 
Building Fund Committee <III) ; W. S. G. A. 
Opera tickets (IV); Hamburg Show (IV). 




SHALER STIDHAM, AY 
3322 Newark Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Philosophy 

Western High School. Head Cheer Leader; 
Swimming (I) ; Varsity (II) ; Lacrosse Squad 
(I, IV); Track Squad (III). 



ALICE STOUT, KKF 

517 Goodwyn Avenue, Memphis, Tenn. 
Central High School. Memphis, Tenn. 



History 




BETTY LOUISE THOMPSON, HB* 
Woodside Farm, kennelt Square, Pa. linglish 

George School. Varsity Hockey Squad (I, II, 
IIL IV) ; Class Hockey (L HI) ; May Day (L 
HI) ? Vice-president Class (I) ; College Dance 
Committee (I) ; Student Affairs Committee (II) ; 
Hamburg Show (II) ; Women's Student Building 
Fund Committee (IV) ; Little Theatre Club. 



LILLY TILY, nB$ 
113 Edgehill Road. Bala, Pa. French Honors 

Marv Baldwin School. Varsitv Hookev (I, II, 
III); Captain (IV); Varsitv Basketball (L IL 
III) ; Capitain Class Basketball (II) ; Captain 
Junior Varsity Basketball (IL III) ; A. A. Council 
fin, IV) ; May Day (L IL HI) ; Hamburg Show 
(I, 11, IIL IV) ; Old English "S"; Le Cercle 
Francais; President (IV); Glee Club (I); Chair- 
man Freshman Show (I); Mortar Board. 






[65; 





MARGARET BROSIUS WALTON, KKT 
George School, Pa. Enslish 

George School. Varsitv Hockey Squad (I) : Class 
Hockev Team (I, ID; Captain (III, IV); Fresh- 
man Commission (II) ; May Day (I, II. HI) ; 
Hamburg Show (II); Class Basketball (III) ; Pro- 
test Committee (IV) ; Pan-Hellenic Council (III, 
IV). 



MARY WALTON, nB* 
Riverview Road, Swarthmore, Pa. French 

George School. Varsity Hockey Team (I, II, III, 
IV); Class Basketball (I); Captain (I); Varsity 
Basketball (II, III, IV) ; Captain (IV) ; Athletic 
Association Council (II, III, IV); Treasurer 
(HI); Recording Secretary of Somerville (II); 
Hamburg Show (HI); Le Cercle Francais (IV); 
Tennis Champion (II, HI); Winner of Old Eng- 
lish "S". 



FREDERICK GEORGE WEIGAND, 02 H 
4025 Comly Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chemical Engineering 

Northeast High School. Football Squad (I, II, 
nil; Swimming (I); Vice-president Chemistry 
Manager (IV); "S" Club; Class Treasurer (II-2). 
Club (IV); Engineers Club. 



FRANCES FISHER WHITE. $K1' 

Atlantic City, N. J. Political Scienie 

Winchester School. Soccer Squad (I. II. IID ; 

Varsitv (IV); Tennis (1. 11. Ill): Varsity (i\ j: 

Manager (IV); "S" Club: Class Treasurer (11-2). 





[66] 







JOSIAH WHITE. $Kip 

138 N. Harrisburg Avenue, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Engineering 
Winchester School. Radio Club. 



WILLIAM BALDWIN WICKERSHAM, AY 
125 St. Paul's Road. Ardmore, Pa. Engineering 
Lower Merion High School. Hamburg Show (II, 
m, IV); Glee Club (L IL IH, IVl; Band (IL 
IIL IV); Omicron Omega (IH, IV); Engineers 
Club. 



ALICE WILLIAMS. AAT 
921 Fayette Avenue, Conshohocken, 

Mathematics 
Conshohocken High School. Glee Club (I, II) ■ 
Chorus (in, IV); May Day (L HH: Freshman 
Show (I); Opera (III. IV) ; Lost and Found Com- 
mittee of Worth (IV). 



SYLVIA CHALFONTE WINDLE 

Dellwyn, West Chester, Pa. Social Science Honors 
George School. Hamburg Show (I, 11, IH, IV) ; 
Student Affairs (II) ; May Day (II) ; Archery 
Team (IH, IV). 



HOWARD JOHN WOOD, ^KW 
Edgemoor, Del. Chemical Engineering 

Wilmington High School. Phoenix (L H, III); 
Class President (II-l) ; Soccer (IH, IV); Track 
(IH, IV); M. S. G. A. (IV); Chemistry Club; 
Kwink; Book and Key. 



MARGARET WORTH, KA0 
Claymont, DeL English Honors 

Dana Hall. Associate-Editor of Halcyon; Hockey 
Squad (I, II) ; Coranto; English Club (Honor- 
ary) : Student Government Honor Committee; 
Portfolio Staff; Mortar Board; Song Book Com- 
mittee of Student Government; Philosophy Club; 
Hamburg Show (I, II); Freshman Commission 
IH); Class Hockey (I). 






167] 




Ex-Members, Class of 1929 



Ira Winslow Barnes 
Donald Webster Baxter 
J. Russell Bolin 
Edgar Stanley Bowers 
Mary Margaret Brown 
Linda Ann Buffington 
John Augustus Bullard 
Howard Benjamin Gates 
William Cresson Cheesenian 
Russell Edwin Clift 
H. Walton Coles 
Charles White Crouse 
Ruby Eva Davis 
Jack Deacon 
Dalny Elma Doughman 
Sara Morey Ferris 
Robert Earl Fix 
Sara-Chace Franklin 
Wilmer Krusen Gallagher 
Raymond Sanford Garber 
Constance Sarah Gaskill 
Eleanor Gawthrop Hayes 
Joseph William Hertle 

John 



Mary Elizabeth Hilles 
Morris Keat Hughes 
Livingston Stark Jennings 
Leroy Rudolph Kaltreider 
Elizabeth Casselberry Kersey 
Joseph M. Livezey 
John Dravo McCreery 
Allison Saybolt McMillin 
Mary Margaret Malott 
Louise Mather 
Theodore Robert Miller 
Ralph Molynex Mitchell, Jr. 
Hallie Isabel Morgan 
John F. Penrose, Jr. 
Harry Bradley Potter 
Agnes Louise Russel 
Karl Theodore Schlotterbeck 
Herbert Irwin Slifer 
Fred Rothwell Taylor 
Richard Van Kleeck 
Jackson Taylor 
Anne Wain 

James Pearre Wantz. Jr. 
Sharpless Worth 



68] 




[69] 




Treasurer 
Lawrence M. Russell 



cers 




SECOND 
SEMESTER 

President 
Howard C. Johnson 

Vice-President 
Pauline Calhoun 

Secretary 
Rebecca Hadley 

Treasurer 
Edward M. Passmore 



U^^^ 



'— ' - ^ 



[VI] 




THEODORA GLADYS ABBOTT 
204 Upland Road, Merion, Pa. 

ENGLISH 
<I>M 
Teddy's most awfully tiny to be 
so important. Perhaps if yon are a 
very astute person you've noticed 
her hopping around being the whole 
secretary of Gwimp and a fifth 
of the Somerville Committee and 
things like that. But no matter how 
astute, you'd never, never know how 
really important she is unless you 
lived on our liall. Our hall would 
he nothing without Teddy: she 
holds the key to our beauty, our 
popularity and — no, never mind 
what hall it is. But here's the deep 
dark secret — toothpaste! She owns 
more toothpaste than any other four 
girls in college. And she's generous, 
which is more than you can say 
about most four girls in college. In 
short (and that's not a pun) — Ted- 
dy's small — but, oh how indispens- 
able! 



DOROTHY AGNES ACKART 
2310 W. 17th St., Wilmington, Del. 

ENGLISH 

KKr 

Gay — Dorothy, humming a bit of 
a tune to herself — and you; 

Glad — Dorothy, off to a dance in 
a gown, crispy — new; 

Kind — Dorothy, giving her time 
to make brighter your bluish days; 

Bright — Dorothy, getting results 
from her books in a way that pays; 

True — Dorothy, making of friend- 
ship more than an empty name; 

Dream — Dorothy, gazing through 
mist-veiled eyes toward — love, or 
fame? 




[72] 



FRANCIS CARTER ALDEN, 

6385 ^ oodl)ine Avenue, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

ECOJNOMICS 

AT 

Francis Carter Alden, called Reds 
by the common people is not only a 
track man; he is the track man. 
You can't get to know very much 
about him if you try to run around 
the track like we did and get an 
interview while he is running, be- 
cause he always seems to run in 
front and our eyes got full of cin- 
ders. So we cornered the lion in 
his den, and he very kindly gave the 
following information which he 
said we could use for publication. 

He attriljutes his success to the 
fact that he eats bran, and has kept 
on the straight and narrow path 
(any distance up to 220 yards). He 
also said that while he made some 
speed on the cinders his best eflorts 
were put forth trying to get to 
breakfast from ^ barton while the 
bell was ringing. 






BETTY LOYND BAMBERGER 

2436 W. 18th St., Wilmington, Del. 

FRENCH 

Betty doesn't like to be called 
Angel-face — not a bit; that's why 
we call her that. It's such fun to 
watch an angel-face trying to muss 
itself up into a not-angel-face — espe- 
cially when it can't possibly succeed. 
And Betty's so sweet and un-ruffle- 
able on the inside, that she can't 
help being that way on the outside 
too — whether she will or no. She 
seems to think it's a dreadful dis- 
advantage — but that's only because 
she can't be somebody else looking 
at Betty Bamberger. 



73 



^ 



1 



HELEN CECILE BESSEMER, 

1608 H Street, S. E., 

Washington, D. C. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

Helen has the softest lirown eyes 
of anyone I've ever seen. And 
they're not just plain eyes — they're 
eyes that know things. They know 
lots and lots ahout kings and queens 
and revolutions and parliaments 
and literary backgrounds. But they 
know, too. aljout you — aliout the 
heautifulness of the little poem you 
wrote and didn't dare show any- 
body, and ahout the paper you 
worked on for days and days and 
then only pulled a C. And some- 
how, you don't mind her knowing — 
not the least Ijit. \ ou"re reallv 
glad! 



ANNA ELIZABETH BENNETT 

52 West 84th Street, New York City 

xr> 

ENGLISH 

Sing a song of Betty 

Who plays baskethall. 
She wears a million bracelets 

That jingle down the hall. 
Bettys temperamental. 

With a radical quirk. 
She likes bull sessions. 

Philosophv and work. 

Sing a song of Betty. 

Enthusiastic, liright. 
Pep is 'most her specialty. 

Top notch ? ^ ou're right ! 



[T4] 



ANNA LIPPINCOTT BIDDLE, 
Riverton, N. J. 
MATHEMATICS 

KAe 

Nance has men, now and then ! 

She has looks, and clothes! 
If there's something going on, 

You het Nancy always goes! 

Nancy's disposition's smooth. 
Quiet with unruffled poise, 

Sphinxlike, leads a charming life. 
Making scarcely any noise. 

Make exception for her giggle. 

Coming unexpectedly. 
How she happens to like math 

Still remains a mystery! 








ROBERT FORSYTHE BISHOP 
Swarthmore, Pa. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

D'ya see that white-haired guy out 
there runnin' around? Well, they 
call him Boh Bishop, an' he lives 
right here in Swarthmore. Aw, no; 
who said he was chasin' butterflies! 
That there's a lay cross stick he's 
got in his hands. He's one of the 
stars o' this year's team. And that 
ain't all. either. I heard two o' 
these college fellers talkin' about 
him the other day and one of 'em 
said he plays a swell game o' bridge. 
I guess that's one o' their winter 
indoor sports that I ain't seen yet, 
but I betcha he's pretty good at it. 
The other guy said sumpin' 'bout 
him doin' 'onners work beside ; any- 
way he's always rushin' around with 
])ooks or sumpin'. 



[75: 



w% 




ROBERT LIPPINCOTT BOOTH, 

975 Cedar Brook Road, 

Plainfield, N. J. 

ECONOMICS 

AT 

An accurate and exhaustive sur- 
vey made by our demon statistician 
on the first of last April proved that 
the gentleman herewith pictured is 
the only living person who is both a 
football player and a musician. 
Without being either double-jointed 
or feeble-minded, he wrestles 
equally well with a pigskin and a 
Sousaphone. 

In addition to these noteworthy 
activities. Bob plays a little lacrosse, 
was president of his sophomore 
class, and does an excellent cowboy 
act on his motorcycle. His other 
bid for fame is the fact that be- 
tween August and December he 
suffered a broken left hand, a 
broken right hand, and a broken 
nose. It is suspected that these in- 
juries were inflicted by residents of 
C section who disliked his midnight 
practicing on the funny big horn. 



WILLIAM ANTOiN BOONE 

209 Oakwood Ave., Ottumwa, la. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

*Ae 

If you ever happen into the town 
of Ottumwa, Iowa — (don't be em- 
barrassed; we never heard of the 
place, either ) — and want to hear 
Swarthmore lauded, go around and 
have a conversation with Mrs. 
Boone. It won't be long before you 
will discover that Miss Brierly's 
food must be about the most won- 
derful on earth, for Billy grew two 
inches last year. He came home in 
the summer all of five feet six in his 
stocking feet. 

Then, if you want to be dis- 
illusioned, go to one of Bill's room- 
mates and he'll tell you that it 
wasn't Miss Brierly at all — it was 
just that Kwink and a Lacrosse 
letter came both in the same year. 

Now you know who Bill is. Right. 
He's the Honors student who spends 
all year trying to capture a little 
rubber ball with his butterfly net. 




HOWARD EVANSON BOYER 
714 North Fifth St., Reading, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

<i>2K 

Behokl! Curly Boyer — the pride 
of Reading, and the possessor of the 
curhest hair and the readiest smile 
on the campus. It is something of 
a college mystery how he ever pulls 
a comb through his tangled mass of 
crowning glory, hut he manages it 
somehow and the co-eds all agree 
that the result is "so cute." 

Curly performs the exacting 
duties of assistant football manager 
with polish and finesse. In the win- 
ter, when the gridiron warriors are 
hibernating and have no need of a 
manager ( ? ) , Curly lends his tal- 
ents to the Glee Clul). But when 
the voice of spring calls, he hastens 
outdoors again to join the cinder- 
pounders of the track team. In 
addition to all this, he manages to 
spend an exceedingly large amount 
of time in the library. 





SARAH WOOD BRECHT 
539 George Street, Norristown, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

Ar 
s the second Norristown 
Sally, who conies bustling 
with a thousand and one 
Sally, who wears a 



This 
Breclit. 
along 

things to do 

bandana. Who's nice to have 
around, because she's natural, and 
genuine, and has a keen sense of 
humor. Full of fun, and kindness. 
Handy at smiling, and chatting. 
Adept at achieving marks, and ad- 
miration. And by the way, if you 
want anything, just ask Sally! 





LOUIS SLOAN BRINGHURST 

Felton, Del. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND ZOOLOGY 

<I>ZK 

Surely there is not a person 
around college who is not familiar 
with B section's reputation for 
nightly production of harsh, unmus- 
ical sounds. The fact that Lou lives 
in this section is. however, no reflec- 
tion upon his character, for there 
are few persons on the campus from 
whom we hear less. The energy he 
thus saves up is very usefully ex- 
pended in playing soccer. All fol- 
lowers of that sport will testify that 
the Garnet combination would be 
very incomplete without Lou's pres- 
ence on the field during every 
varsity game. Moreover, he is a 
pre-med. student, which fact in itself 
proves that here is one soccer 
player who uses his head for other 
things than heading the soccer ball. 



HOWARD FRANCIS BROWN 

122 North Ogden St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

ECONOMICS 

"Howie" Brown has, as you can 
see from his picture here, one of 
those frank open faces that one sees 
above colored posters advertising 
neckties, or collars or cough-drops 
or something. But we don't want 
you to get the impression that 
"Howie" is a collar ad. or one of 
the Smith Brothers -^ because 
"Howie" is an athlete and a waiter 
too. He can dribble soccer balls 
and soup with equal ease and has 
earned an S running around the 
track. However, he doesn't devote 
all his time to things like those 
above mentioned; he has been 
known to go to Chester upon 
occasion and once he is said to have 
been seen fussing — but we couldn't 
think anything like that of "Howie." 




[78] 



FA^ 



DONALD EVERETT BUCKWELL 
35 East Tenth St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ENGLISH 
<I>2K 
Buck is a man about college in 
more than one wa)". We don't see 
a great deal of him, but most every- 
where we go we find evidences of 
his presence. At the Phoenix of- 
fice — two new scoops, two big stor- 
ies, a pile of well-read proof: chez le 
Halcyon editor, dozens of blue pen- 
cilled Junior biographies; at the 
Little Theatre, a whole set of hand- 
some props: in his room, the steady, 
rhythmic tapping of a typewriter, 
accompanied by the faint protests 
of two gasping roommates. Sand- 
wiched in between a scoop and an 
editorial often conies a bridge game, 
occasionally a trip to town, once in 
a while a date. Especially the lat- 
ter, for what girl can resist smooth, 
dark hair, suave features, and the 
cute smile that issues from the cor- 
ner of his moutli? 





HELEN PAULINE CALHOUN 
500 Mohawk Avenue, Norwood, Pa. 

HISTORY 

Pauline's responsible through and 
through. 
With the best sense of humor, you 
know; 
She's lots o' fun, she makes noise, 
too; 
Life looks good wherever she may 
go. 

"Watch me cry," says she, never 
upset; 
"Troubles come, but see if I 
care!" 
She likes everyone, it's mutual, you 
bet; 
She's a good sport just anywhere. 



79] 





REBECCA SHOCK CASTLE 
Wayne, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

Betty's a brick. She has a sense 
of humor you wish you had; she 
has a disposition you envy. She 
manages our swimming team, 
spends hours helping people, and 
still has time to study now and 
then. Betty gets along with every- 
one — proof: she has five room- 
mates! And as we write all this 
about her, we can just hear her say- 
ing, "Must you!" 



HAROLD FREDERICK CARTER, 

121 Chestnut St., 

Port Monmouth, N. J. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Harold Frederick Carter is known 
around college as Nick Carter, and 
while he does not shoot from the 
hip or even carry two guns, as did 
that valiant hero of the dime novels, 
our Nick does manage to make him- 
self heard around college. Partic- 
ularly on the touch football team 
which takes its exercise in front of 
Wharton Hall on ])right fall after- 
noons. Besides this, Nick is one of 
our most promising Honors stu- 
dents, and has shown signs of intel- 
ligence in other ways, particularly 
that of forsaking the college dining- 
room for the Harvard Tea Room. 
Nick also pounds a typewriter in 
the English office and has managed 
in his spare time to make any num- 
ber of friends who are willing to tell 
you all about him. 




^^ 



80 



RUTH BLACKBURN CLEAVER 
Rutledge, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

Ar 

Woots is a particularly surprising 
girl — and the surprise is very nice. 
That is — if you walked down the 
hall hehind her you might, well, 
you might not even know you were 
walking down the hall hehind her. 
But if you walked up the hall and 
met her, you'd know in a minute, 
or rather, in a look. Of course, 
she's the girl who plays hockey 
and haskethall and had the hest 
costume at the Junior dance and 
goes to Y. W. conferences and works 
on Student Government and a few 
things like that. She's the kind of 
a person who runs hecause walking 
takes twice as long. 

What? You knew her at George 
School? Well, for goodness sake — 
and me wasting all this time! 





HENRY B. COLES, JR. 
224 East Main St.. Moorestown, N. J. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

AT 

Our Secret Longings are strange, 
but we can't understand this chap 
Hen Coles. He was President of 
the Student Government Associa- 
tion of B Section College in his 
sophomore year, conducting the 
affairs of dormitory life more suc- 
cessfully than at any time thereto- 
fore. It is said that under his 
administration a curfew system was 
instituted bringing quiet to the stu- 
dents every evening at one o'clock. 
Moreover, he transferred to Swarth- 
more this fall and distinguished 
himself as one of the three best 
half-backs on a stellar soccer eleven. 
What more could be desired in any 
college career? Yet he confides 
that his Great Secret Longing is — 
to go to the movies at Chester every 
Saturday night. 



81 





MARVIN ROBERTS COLES, 

30 East Oak Ave., Moorestown, N. J. 

ENGLISH 

e2n 

"Hey, you! Here's your paper." 
Marv Coles is Wharton Hall's 
newsboy. Every night about forty 
seconds before train time he gallops 
down to the station for bis Bulletins, 
and returns to deliver them by a 
system all his own. "It's lots 
simpler to stand in the hall and yell 
for a guy to come get bis paper than 
it is to take it to him," Marv says, 
and he usually distributes his sheets 
by that method. 

Among other things, Marv plays 
soccer, and has a sense of humor. 
It is said that he tells jokes to the 
opposing players, and kicks the l)all 
past them while they are laughing. 
His hobby is to keep people in good 
humor, and he is always the center 
of a laughing crowd. Rumor has it 
that he is taking a course in journal- 
ism so he can run a newspaper stand 
after he graduates. 



MARIAN LILLIAN COLSON 
Woodstown, N. J. 

LATIN 

AAT 

A weary, but undaunted Halcyon 
scribe, on consulting Marian's 
friends, was on the verge of a ner- 
vous breakdown. 

Ye Scribe: 

Q. — What is Marian's major? 

A. — Latin, but she reads Greek, 
too. 

Q. — And what are her outstand- 
ing characteristics? 

A. — H-m-m. — Well, she has a 
good disposition, a sense of humor: 
she's very friendly and kind, rather 
shy; a conscientious bard worker; 
likes flowers and poetry — 

Ye Scribe, gratefully — Hold on 
there! That's enough; we can't 
write too much you know ! 



GARRET EDWARD CONKLIN 

Villa Le Caroubier, Cap d'Ail, 

France 

EiVGLISH 

On the Day of Judgment, when 
Gabriel turns over to St. Peter the 
list of those guilty of being smooth- 
ies, lo, Conklin's name will lead all 
the rest. And if Peter doubts Gar- 
ret's qualifications to hold so ex- 
alted a position, Gabriel will sum- 
mon the angel of a Swarthmore 
co-ed (if there are any) and she'll 
tell the saint that he deserves it. 
Garret came to Swarthmore for two 
years and established quite a repu- 
tation for himself as a man-about- 
canipus. After a European vaca- 
tion he is in our midst again, sing- 
ing a lusty bass in the Glee Club 
and lending his courtly presence to 
numerous social functions both on 
and off the campus. 





JULIEN DAVIS CORNELL, 
Central Valley, N. Y. 
SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Despite his cocky cadetish car- 
riage Cornell never attended ^ est 
Point. He picked up the air while 
on the Continent hobnobbing with 
the Swiss Guards. It's a dapper 
way he has tliat has stood him in 
good stead, for rumor has it that no 
one can "soldier" to better advan- 
tage. Otherwise how could he go to 
tliree Penn football gan.es. make a 
girls' fraternity dance, and then 
even take Honors work — all in one 
college career? And otherwise how 
is it that he can come into the 
remains of a rough rough-house and 
be acclaimed as the roughest of the 
crew? Yes, it's all because of that 
cadetish carriage. 



^ 



^^m 



[83 




C. EDWARD DePUY, 

105 South Eighth St., 

Stroudsburg, Pa. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Behold! Behold! The God of 
argument has come to earth and in 
the guise of none other than 
"Mister" DePuy; Honors student 
and able and efficient arguer. He is 
not, let us call to your attention, a 
vulgar debater who needs must have 
an audience to defend or decry a 
subject, but merely one who argues 
on any subject, any time and any- 
v/here, whether it be the compara- 
tive peace of an Honors seminar or 
in the hubbub of the shower room. 
He also, and this is a point to be 
noted, always argues on the radical 
side of the question. 

But he must study to get facts, so 
if you ever see a slim blond boy 
with one hook at least under bis 
arm, you can be sure that it is 
DePuv hound for the library. 



NANCY DEANE 
100 Poplar Walk, Ridley Park, Pa. 

EiVGLISH 

XP. 

Activities? The girl about whom 
we can truly say that college will 
never be the same after she leaves. 
\^ hat between Student Government 
— athletic teams — managerships — 
not to say Little 1 heatre Clulj ! 

Sympathetic? Obliging? ^ ell, if 
you havent been to tell Xancy your 
most sacred secret, or dashed in to 
get her to do something at the last 
minute — anything from taking over 
a hopeless dance chorus to pumping 
up a tire — you're no Swarthmorean, 
that's all. 

And when we finally realize that 
shes the sort ot a girl with whom 
we can make both the crack about 
the windy weather and the advan- 
tage, at a dinner dance, of sitting 
next to a guj- named Passmore, this 
particular reporter turns up his toes 
and dies happily — a life-long ambi- 
tion realized. 




Wl 




DOROTHY DITTER 
906 West Erie Avenue, Philadelphia 

SOCIAL SCIE^'CE HONORS 

sn 

Dottie has such unusual charms — 

In a Ijoisterous dormitory Dottie 
is ever quiet. 

lii a rushing college Dottie al- 
ways has time to stop and help the 
"other fella." 

Among continually requesting 
friends Dottie never fails. 

And in spite of all this Dottie 
still succeeds in tucking away to her 
credit a delightful little average. 





FRANCES E. EATON 
105 South Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

xn 

Fran has embarked on the ardu- 
ous career of a Social Science Hon- 
ors student, and although she must 
needs meet the usual vicissitudes 
along the way we think she antici- 
pates some real compensations. You 
see, Fran is quite the debater and 
we suspect that the Honors seminar 
does not object to her enlivening 
influence. 

Then, too, if you've ever peeped 
in on a play rehearsal you were sure 
to see her acting, or helping in some 
way, — she does all equally well. To 
Fran we say with Tennyson, "Charm 
us, orator!" for we do love her 
knowing comments and decided 
ideas. 



85 





FRANKLIN CARNELL EDEN, 

4915 Monument Road, 

Philadelphia. Pa. 

POUTICAL SCIENCE 

ezn 

Don't let Bud fool you! He really 
isn't so serious. He's just one of 
those Philadelphia boys who had 
enough sense to scorn the home 
town University for dear old Swarth- 
niore. He isn't alssolutely the last 
word in political science, but maybe 
he didn't step out last spring ^vhen 
he was elected assistant manager of 
track. In being elected to this office- 
Bud is a ready proof that Libor 
shall have its re\vard. 

Bud's apparent seriousness is not 
the only thing to Ijefuddle an 
ignorant observer. Under tliat man- 
agerial aspect. Bud can really fly off 
the handle at times. Occasionally 
he has bunged up the 'Wharton 
courts in slam-bang tennis matches, 
notably in the fall tournaments. 



EDGAR I. EISENSTAEDT 

616 Crescent Court, 
Highland Park, 111. 
CHEMISTRY HONORS 

Wharton Club 

Although it is a long ride from 
Chicago to Swarthmore, Eddie 
Eisenstaedt was just the man to take 
that ride. In his freshman year 
Eddie started out as the master of 
chemical formulae and phenomena. 
This zeal for chemistry elected him 
president of the chemistry club. 
And if you don't believe in two 
point three averages, just take a 
look at some of his reports. 

Eddie has been out wearing 
down the cinder path in the spring 
but his rmming is not in vain — it's 
only a thousand miles to Chicago 
and any man would be an Olympic 
marathoner. Then, Eddie can tell 
you about anything from heart 
pulsations to Mayor Thompson and 
the gun fights in Chicago. 




^^ 



86 



JEAN FAHRINGER 
Audenried, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

KKr 

There are two jeans. One you 
know — one who dances and sings 
and never is tired; one who is gay 
with always a merry laugh on her 
lips-; one who plays all day, and 
who is quite adored. 

But if you've seen the dreams 
hehind her eyes, you know where 
the other Jean lives — the Jean 
that's a lovely secret. Sometimes 
she comes out, shyly, for a mo- 
ment, and her voice is like music. 
But always she goes hack hefore 
youve noticed she was there, be- 
cause — well hecause, after all, she is 
a secret . . . 

But I know there are two Jeans! 





HAINES BALL FELTER, 

4511 Groveland Ave., 

Baltimore, Md. 

ECONOMICS 

Wharton Club 

If you remember a tall, dark- 
haired fellow who starred as a vil- 
lain in certain Theatre Club plays, 
you know Felter. 

If you remember a liashy forward 
in the interfraternity basketball 
series, you also know Felter. 

If you remember a bridge expert 
whose games kept most of B Sec- 
tion awake all night, you have a 
very close acquaintanceship with 
Felter. 

But — if you remember a languid 
southern gentleman who spent most 
of his time quietly studying by him- 
self, then you must be thinking of 
some other guy. It certainly was 
not Felter. 



^m 



) ) \ > 





JOHN HOWARD FERGUS, 
331 East State St., Media, Pa. 

ELECTRICAL ENGIIVEERIiSG 

Fergus is one of the hardy clan of 
day students who manage to survive 
the perilous journey from home to 
college twice a day in an asthmatic 
Ford. But this is not his only dis- 
tinction — for he is an electrical 
engineer, and as such has managed 
to stay in college for three years, 
with bright prospects of a fourth. 
These two achievements would 
assure him a prominent niche in the 
collegiate Hall of Fame, were he not 
far too modest for such an honor. 
When we approached him about the 
matter, he just smiled, changed the 
subject, climbed aboard his flivver 
and drove home. 



BARTON PURDY FERRIS, 
340 Irving Ave., Port Chester, N. Y. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

<1>K* 

There's no use withholding the 
secret any longer — Bart Ferris is a 
smoothie. Just look at his picture, 
watch him at a dance, listen to his 
line, and you'll agree. Back home, 
they say, he is known as the King 
of the Port Chester Night Clubs. 
Bart is perhaps the best-dressed 
man in college, and all "^ barton 
peers from its windows when he 
crosses the Quad to learn the 
latest in ties or the correct angle 
at which a derby should be worn. 
All of Bart's smoothness isn't 
wasted (!) on the co-eds, how- 
ever, he uses some of it in man- 
aging the turbulent debaters and in 
officiating as vice-president of the 
Forum. When he finishes with 
political science here at Swarth- 
more, we expect to see him in 
Washington, a valuable addition to 
diplomatic teas and congressional 
dinners. 




f, 



SALLY FISHER, 
Arlington, Vermont 

ENGLISH HONORS 

KKr 

"Well, say, aren't you even going 
to speak to me, Sally?" 

"Didn't I speak to you? But 
don't feel hurt because as for my 
being, sociable, well, you know, and 
besides I'm just walking on air be- 
cause I've just spent all my money 
for going home vacation on a new 
Victrola and records, the whole Nut- 
cracker Suite ! Come on up and hear 
it but I can't visit afterwards be- 
cause I've got to do twenty pages of 
Rashdall for a seminar. Sorry — isn't 
it the most perfect day? I've just 
had a walk through leaves and 
brambles and wind and mud ; it was 
gorgeous! Isn't life just too thrilling 
but I suppose one pays for it in 
some other way. Yes, I think that's 
so ... I can't wait a second longer 
to hear the records so come on." 





ELEANOR FLEXNER, 
150 East 72nd Street, New York City 

ENGLISH HONORS 

Anyone who lived on Flex's hall 
last year knows that when she says 

"Sh sh!" she means it. Flex is 

like that — what she says in Phoenix 
articles and Portfolio stories, she 
means, too. You'll nearly always 
find her rushing around . . . (no- 
body can disappear and return as 
quickly as she), but she must stop 
sometime because when the Dean's 
office reports quarterly she is among 
the prouder ones. Tbis year she is 
delving into Honors work in Eng- 
lish and is very interested in jour- 
nalism. Her copyreading is famed 
among Phoenix scribes, and when 
she's in charge things are accom- 
plished — and how!! 




MARGUERITE FOSTER, 
107 W. Penn St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

xn 

"Is it getting later?'' queried Peg 
as she hurried into the room after a 
pressing quest. Going somewhere 
again ! But she's one of those who 
can, and still get A's without any 
troujjle. You've heard Peg's quiet? 
Perhaps she is, on the whole, hut 
has she ever started you laughing? 
No? Then you surely don't know 
her. Once she starts on a rampage 
of witticisms — well, just try and be 
sensible. Did we say she was going 
out? Not now — there's a hull ses- 
sion started. 



ADA PALMER FULLER, 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

Did you ever play charades? 
Then if we were to start singing 
"going in and out the window," or 
dress up in knockout clothes, put on 
a long stride, and a slender tallness, 
would you guess — ? Of course you 
would; Ada! If you heard someone 
thumping loudly up the stairs and 
simultaneously, "Oh Lord! Now 
why under the sun he ever — what? 
Well I should say not! My dear, if 
I actually — " — would you. But 
look here; Ada says she's tired of 
being ridden. So suppose we just 
say Ada's pretty, popular, put to- 
gether well, a peach, and 0. K. — 
howzat? 




[ 90 



WARNER WINSLOW GARDNER, 
75 Bedford St., N. Y. C. 

CHEMISTRY HONORS 

e^n 

From Georgia to Westtowii to 
Swarthmore — such is the Odyssey of 
Warner the inscrutable. He early 
showed himself to be the stuff of 
which Honor Students are made by 
his numerous essays in practice- 
writing class on the probability and 
nature of God, but lately chemistry 
has overthrown theology and claim- 
ed him for her own. In fact so de- 
voted is he to his new mistress that 
if you see a lone figvire hurrying 
over towards the Chemistry Build- 
ing at any hour of the day or night, 
the chances are that it's Gardner 
on his way to juggle with his belov- 
ed retorts and formulae. 





CECELIA GARRIGUES 
2 Forley St., Elmhurst, L. I. 

FRENCH 

Behold! Energy Personified! You 
never see Cis enter a room in any 
other way than with a burst which 
recalls a blast of cold wind; nor 
does she do anything else half- 
heartedly. We are told that be- 
tween classes at tlie Sorbonne this 
year Cis has been spending her time 
riding bicycles all over France and 
chatting with numerous counts — im- 
pressing them with the "driving 
power" of those Americans, no 
doubt. Well, we certainly missed 
you at the swimming meets, Cis, but 
we'll see you again next year, n'est- 
ce pas? 



91 




^ 



ROBERT LISLE GOULD, 
Locust Vale, Townsend, Md. 

MATHEMATICS 
<1>2K 

Robert Lisle Gould, alias Doc, 
conies to us from near the faraway 
city of Baltimore. He landed here 
in his freshman year with a shyness 
for work and a love for entertaining 
members of the opposite sex. Per- 
haps that explains the fact that we 
found him sojourning in Baltimore 
the first semester of this year, try- 
ing to gather up a few credits at 
Hopkins. 

Doc's other main weakness, be- 
sides entertaining the Parrish 
Dwellers, is a love for lacrosse. 
No activity seems a success with- 
out Doc, whether it be a fraternity 
affair, a freshman party, a trip to 
Lamb's, or a bull session — everyone 
is so used to his being right on hand 
for all of these, ready with some 
witty remark to begin the thing cor- 
rectly. 



MARION WEST GEARE, 
Swarthniore, Pa. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

KKT 

Brown Waves . . . deep misty 
pools, splashed with sunlight . . . 
grace . . . dark laughter . . . You 
could get poetic aljout Geary — she's 
that kind. Like a reed swayed by 
the wind — when she dances. (If 
you don't believe it, just watch her 
some time). — Then come down to 
the gym — Geary's always there — and 
when you've seen her swim — Well, 
you'll know why Swarthmore al- 
ways wins its meets. We couldn't 
lose, with Geary in the line-up — 
Geary's that kind. 




92' 



^ 



MERIDA F. GREY. 
712 Wynnewood Rd.. Phila.. Pa. 

BIOLOGY 

nB<i> 

You mean you actually have to 
write me up for the Halcyon? Oh, 
how ghastly! Can you beat it? My 
dear, indeed Fm not a student, I ac- 
tually got a flat two points this time, 
can you iTnaginc that? Fm afraid to 
go home, I mean I actually am. 

Oh what the heck, she did, now I 
ask you! Oh how cute. Well, Fll 
be a hot cup of tea — I never 
thought of that! 

Oh, I couldn't go with you now — 
got to go to lab, can you feature 
that! But listen, be easy on that 
write-up — anything but a poem — 
you just cant do that! 



MARGARET GURNEY, 

1217 Gallatin Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

MATHEMATICS HONORS 

AAT 

"Oh, yes, I know Mig Gurney! 
She's a Math Honors student, isn't 
she? Always over at the Observ- 
atory a lot . . ." 

"Uh-hvda . . . plays basketball 
and swims on the class teams, sings 
in the chorus . . ." 

"Sa-ay, how does she do it all? 
And she always seems to have time 
to talk and have a good time." 

"Brains, woman, lirains! Mig's an 
Open Scholar." 

"Oh, I see." 




HELEN REBECCA HADLEY 
Wayne, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

KKr 

Will some aspiring Lindbergh try 
a flight to Mars, and see if they have 
a new set of words up there? We 
can't use the same old words about 
Becky. No one can describe, quite, 
that feeling that comes over one 
when a sudden fresh breeze moves 
past — and no better can we catch in 
mere words the sensation of new- 
ness and aliveness that we get when 
Becky comes in with that glistening 
look of interest in her eyes, and lit- 
tle catch of Jjreath before an excited 
speech, as if she can't wait to get 
into the thick of it. 

Can anyone paint a blue sparkle 
in water, and make it perfect? 
Well, we defy you to catch that 
same sparkle in Becky's eyes, and 
put it down on paper in any form. 



CHARLES BERTRAM HAMMELL, 
Absecon, New Jersey 

ECOrvOMICS 

I tell you girls, you want to 
know this man because he is one of 
the high lights of the class and I 
actually mean he really is smooth 
when on a date and he can play 
tennis like nobody's business or can 
swing a wicked foot in a soccer 
game. And you know you must 
make his acquaintance because he 
is not the kind that will make 
advances of his own accord. Ijut 
gosh what a peach of a fellow lie is 
when you do finally know him. for 
he is peppy, bright, game, athletic, 
and handsome. And if you once get 
on the right side of him perhaps 
you might o])tain one of his many 
prize cups to help decorate your 
room. 





MARIAN HAMMING 

35 Heights Terrace, 
Ridgewood, N. J. 

ENGLISH 

KKr 
— Something nice about Bilhe? 
Say, did anyone ever find anything 
about Billie that isn't nice? She's 
the ■ girl that people write 
things about — "Gentlemen Prefer 
Blondes,'' "Five Foot Two, Eyes of 
Blue," and so on and so on. But 
she's the girl that people do things 
about, too — the kind they elect to 
clubs and put on committees and 
take to formals. liecause — oh, be- 
cause she's just the nicest kind of a 
girl to do things ivith, that's all. 
She can be serious, she can Ije 

silly, — 
She's alwavs sweet, and — well, she's 

Bilhe! 





ELIZABETH K. HARBOLD, 
343 College Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

*M 

Once upon a time there was a 
maiden with blue eyes and fair hair 
. . . (they do begin that way, don't 
they?). One day she went out for 
a walk in a deep forest. Soon she 
came face to face with a stranae 
bird. ^ 

"Come, my dear, I shan't hurt 
you," it said kindly. "I'm the 
ancient Phoenix, and I crave news. 
/ must have news! ' 

So Beth began to toil for the 
Phoenix. Presently she came to a 
bouse that looked quite forbidding. 
Beckoning lights bade her enter, 
and lo ! slie was in an English 
Honors seminar! "How funny!" 
thought Beth, but she said nothing 
until she got used to the peculiar 
sound around her. 

But this is no fairj^ tale, for you 
may ask the fair-haired maiden her- 
self. She'll tell you in a gentle voice 
that will take you right back to 
fairyland again. 




[95 







DAVID CHARLES HASKELL 
Warrensburg, N. ^ . 

ENGINEERING 

Wharton Club 

Future President ^ ill Rogers 
ought to 1)6 warned that he need not 
fear for his health if he should 
awaken early some morning and see 
the lights on the Capitol blink sev- 
eral times. For he ought to realize 
that it's just Dave Haskell of 
Swarthmore playing a little trick on 
him, and incidentally announcing 
the hour of the night. 

Not that the President will need 
an introduction to Mr. Haskell — for 
of course Dave will be the Secretary 
of Electricity on his cabinet, but he 
may not know that his Secretary has 

acquired a taste for h raising 

from his three years" sojourn in E 
section. 



EMMA CATHARINE HATFIELD. 
38 Maywood Dr., Danville, 111. 

ENGLISH 

KAe 
There's a quick flash of her ! Puck 
or Juliet? Or is she both? Dance 
with me, then — and we'll go whirl- 
ing 'round, and then we'll laugh, 
such a gay little laugh — and must 
we sigh a soft little sigh, too? But 
you're not really sad, are you Juli- 
et? Oh, no, there's no use thinking 
that, for if I sigh a sigh with you, 
you're only Puck — a dainty, merry 
Puck — so let VIS dance ! 




BENJAMIN CARPENTER 
HAVILAND, 

515 East Oak St., Millville, N. J. 

ECONOMICS 

■I>2K 

One of Swarthmore's twin terrors 
on the gridiron, Bennie strikes fear 
into the heart of many a half-back, 
and no lacrosse man who has felt 
Bennie bring the boom down will 
ever forget it. Nor as President of 
the Sophomore class will he be for- 
gotten by any rebellient freshman 
who has waked in the wee small 
hours of the night to see the two 
iron fists poked through the panels 
of his door. 

But only when you've learned to 
know him, and are used to seeing 
him every day will you appreciate 
the best part of Bennie. An unfail- 
ing good nature that proves the sin- 
cerity of his ready smile, and his 
ability to get along with the devils 
as well as the saints, have given him 
his well-deserved popularity on the 
campus. 





HELEN MARGARET HEADLEY, 
350 Main Street, Madison, N. J. 

ENGLISH 

Ar 

It was an old, old portrait she 
stepped out of — a portrait done 
delicately, in subdued colors^ A 
portrait of a lovely lady, with ivory 
forehead and oval chin and far- 
away eye. A gentle lady with white 
hands and a quiet voice. 

One feels as though — at any mo- 
ment — she might step back again. 



■97 



PA^ 



ELOISE E. S. HETTINGER, 

1325 Mineral Spring Road, 

Reading, Pa. 

LATIN 

Eloquence 

Latin 

Outside man 

Intelligence 

Swords and Foils 

Entertaining 

Hamburg Show 

Enterprising 

Telephone Calls 

TELEPHONE CALLS 

Interest 

Native Charm 

Grace 

Enthusiasm 

Reading, Fa. 



HARRY HEWARD, JR., 

6146 Columbia Ave., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

Probably one of the most con- 
scientious workers of the Junior 
class is Whitey Heward. Besides 
having a conscience, he has a heart 
biff enough for a man three times 
his height. He has never been 
known to disappoint anyone who 
has asked him to lend a hand, and 
he is always willing to attempt any 
task that is assigned to him. Per- 
haps that is why he was such a suc- 
cessful sophomore class treasurer. 

Although Whitey is a star foot- 
hall and lacrosse player, he never 
has to hire the janitor to dust off 
his books. When he is not playing 
he is studying, or selling candy and 
books, or sorting mail, or helping 
one of his friends, hut never wasting 
time. 



98 



ELDREGE M. HILLER, 

Washington Street, Flushing, L. I., 

New York 

ENGLISH 

<i>Ae 

"El" lives in New York, but the 
balmy breezes of the Atlantic at- 
tracted him to Cape Cod. Gallivant- 
ing the summers away in a Cape 
Cod knockabout, he approaches the 
charm of sailor life as nearly as 
possible. 

Although Swarthmore is several 
leagues from the sea "El"' finds the 
air salty enough to retain all out- 
ward appearances of a burly gob. 
His chest expansion corresponds to 
that of a Viking. With the pos- 
sible exception of childish hilarity 
and boisterousness, "El" possesses 
all other sea-going attributes of 
sturdiness, vnitiring labor and silent 
manner. 

One of these rainy days it would 
not be too overwhelming if "El" 
appeared in the drizzling sleet with 
an oilskin, boots and a "North- 
easter." 





GEORGE BURNHAM HOADLEY, 
Swarthmore, Pa. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING HONORS 

We all had to be mighty careful 
of our actions around the campus 
last year for fear that Photographer 
Hoadley would be snapping us and 
putting us in the Halcyon. From 
the most elaborate freshman party 
to the most secluded fussing date, 
nothing escaped the eye of his 
camera. How he found time for it, 
we don't know, for he spends all his 
mornings and afternoons in classes 
and labs, tosses off a couple of 
hours' study in the evenings, and 
spends the rest of his waking hours 
coaching less gifted engineers. For 
George knows his engineering — 
there's no doubt about that. He's 
won the Sigma Tan Medal for the 
last two years and is the only junior 
engineer in honors work. As a 
relaxation, he makes his bow to the 
Muses by playing in the orchestra 
and managing the chorus. 




RAY PERKINS HUNT, 
30 Pennington Ave., Morton, Pa. 

ENGINEERING 

Introducing the short, red-faced 
engineer of the junior class, con- 
trihuted to the college by Morton, 
Pa. Ray always has some kind of 
a lab report which just has to get 
in, but if it's a little horse play or a 
bull session concerning which of the 
courses at college are the biggest 
snaps, he is always ready to enter 
activities. 

Here is a hint to you if ever you 
are in dire need of Ray and don't 
know where to find him. He is 
either home in bed, in Lednum's 
room studying, down at the lodge 
playing bridge, over at Parrish get- 
ting a date for the table party, over 
at Hicks Hall or the shop or some- 
where else in a lab, or over at the 
gymnasium performing his duties as 
assistant manager of lacrosse. 



RUTH WILSON JACKSON 
6445 Greene St., Mt. Airy, Pa. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

KAe 

A sophisticated Quaker 
Sounds like an awful faker. 
And it's frightfully upsetting to dis- 
cover 
That a girl can be as bright 
As a full-moon-lighted night. 
And in spite of all her brains, that 
you can love her! 

It's really quite alarming 

To find a girl who's charming. 

And a paragon at hockey, bridge, 

and tea. 
With a clever bit to say 
On the topics of the day, — 
Really, everything a Swarthmore 

girl should be. . . . 




[loo: 



I 



ELEANOR J ANNE Y, 
New Hope, Pa. 

FRENCH 

"Mademoiselle Janney. so petite, 
Where are you going on those little 
feet?" 
"I'm going to French class, Miss," 
she said, 
With a little toss of her curly 
head. 

"Mademoiselle Janney, excited and 
charming, 
Has anything happened, gay or 
arming.' 
"Home for the week-end. Miss," she 

said, 
"And when I get there I won't go 
to bed." 








Itf^f 






I^^^B 


^^Hp^^ ^^ 


^1 



ELEANOR F. JENKINS, 
Gwynedd, Pa. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

KAG 

The door burst open early Mon- 
day morning — "Hot dog! Clean 
sheets !" Yes, it's Eleanor. How 
did you know she was the originator 
of that College idiom? You bet 
she's done big things, didn't she 
throw the dummy overboard at the 
Freshman party 'way back in '27? 
And isn't she a swimmer? They 
say she almost upset a swimming 
meet one time when she thought of 
something funny while under water. 
Did you ever see anyone do or say 
more crazy things, or think up more 
amusement? No matter what hap- 
pens, Eleanor's always cheerful, 
even while she's studying! 



i i i 

\ '1 



[101] 



^ 




HOWARD COOPER 

JOHNSON, JR., 

101 Mermain Lane, Qiestnut Hill 

ECONOMICS 

AT 

When we talk about the ideal col- 
lege student we like to mention 
Howard Johnson. He has contrib- 
uted something to every phase of 
campus life. He's an Open Scholar 
who didn't try to flunk out; indeed, 
he's been garnering enviable av- 
erages ever since his first mid-sem- 
ester. Socially, he really rates well. 
But it's in Swarthmore's sport world 
that few can surpass him. There, 
more than in any other field, is he 
particularly outstanding — in base- 
ball because of his reach, in basket- 
ball because of his jump, and in 
soccer because of his head. 

If that isn't all round develop- 
ment, we wonder what is. 



RICHARD MORGAN KAIN, 
45 Springettsbury Place, York, Pa. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

There's a club our campus boasts 
Take It Easy is its name 
And there's one among its ranks 
Whom the members proudly claim 
Smooth and clever is tbis lad 
And his comrades call him Kain. 

Would you know what he has done 
How and what he's living for? 
Writer and debater too 
Ponders as a sage of yore 
Just a good boy all around 
And this Halcyon's editor. 





H. DIETZ KELLER, JR., 
807 South George St., York, Pa. 

ENGINEERING 

Wharton Club 
There've been Dutchmen from 
here, and Dutchmen from there, hut 
there've never been Dutchmen Hke 
those from York — a statement 
which Dietz will proudly confirm. 
While his brother was in college, 
Dietz was kept under a guiding 
hand, but in his junior year, with 
the restraining influence departed, 
he contracted a weakness for cal- 
culus, in spite of being a full- 
fledged engineer. Since he came to 
college his life has been one long 
gamble with fate, surveyor's tran- 
sits, and shorthand multiplication. 
We have heard, moreover, that the 
faculty is on the lookout for Dietz; 
somehow the rumor arose that he 
intended to introduce beer and 
pretzels at honors teas and put Dr. 
Brooks out of a job. 





EDWARD MORGAN 

LAPHAM, JR. 

Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y. 

ECONOMICS 

■i>Ae 

Ted is the sort of boy that never 
takes any chances. If he wants to 
be sure of a thing, he doesn't leave 
it for others to do, he goes out and 
does it himself. Here's the proof: 
— Ted came to Swarthmore and 
made the tennis team. Well, that 
was fine, but he Jiegan to be afraid 
that the team might not be properly 
managed in the years to come, so he 
got himself elected assistant man- 
ager. Then he worried because the 
team wasn't pulling down enough 
publicity — what did he do liut grab 
off a position on the Phoenix staff, 
where he could keep an eagle eye 
on the sport page. In his odd mo- 
ments he edits the feature section 
of the Halcyon and he promises 
that this year's features will be even 
more humorous and sparkling, if 
possilile, than the Ijack files of the 
Congressional Record. 



103 ] 




LOIS DAY LARZELERE 
25 S. Harvard Ave., 
Upper Darby, Pa. 

FRENCH 

■I'M 

Lois is one of those people who 
doesn't show on purpose. And 
they're nice — people like that. 
They're always doing the jobs no 
one else wants; they're always being 
in the right place at the right time 
— and then sort of quietly walking 
away before you've had a chance to 
turn around and thank them. But 
if you've ever cornered her long 
enough to look at her, you've no- 
ticed the sweetness of her brown 
eyes and the fun sparkling in them 
— and you've been quite sure you 
were going to see her lots more 
from then on. 



JOHN RUSSELL LeCRON 
3113 Huey Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

Well, here's just another one of 
those Drexel Hill boys who make 
soccer a real sport at Swarthmore. 
Johnny earned his letter for the last 
two years and not only that — he is 
one of that little two per cent who 
boots the goals for the Garnet. 
Johnny has been no slouch in activ- 
ities. He is a member of Kwink 
and somewhat of a baseball player. 
Although he is a day student you 
can see him around the campus any 
day of the week taking active part 
in all that is doing — including the 
A section sprees. 





PHILIP LEIGH, 

105 North DeLancey Place, 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

ECONOMICS 

Phil bears out our conception of 
what a typical Swarthniore student 
is. He engages in two major sports 
— fussing and week-end trips, and 
one ' minor sport — studying. Next 
to girls, his particular weaknesses 
are baseball and tennis; and in his 
off-hours he is occasionally to be 
found with a book in his hand. His 
intentions are all of the best in this 
respect, but — well, perhaps the 
divine spark just isn't there. Nights 
in B section, too, are enlivened by 
Phil's cheerful presence, and as 
chairs and tables come hurtling 
forth from upper story windows, 
one would do well to hazard a guess 
that Phil Leigh is just inside. 





EDWARD NEEDLES 
LIPPINCOTT, 

145 South North Carolina Ave., 
Atlantic City, N. J. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Ned is one of those boys who is 

Either playing bridge or 

Down at the Library doing Honors 

work. 
Leading 
Into his 

Partner's strong suit or 
Playing the right card at the right 

time 
Is his biggest asset in Bridge. 
Neverthless, we all 
Consider Ned 
One of 

The hardest all-around workers in 
This college. 



IS 



^ 



DOUGLASS A. MacMURCHY, 
504 Harrison St., Ridley Park, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

If you are one of those who fre- 
quent the library (merely suppos- 
ing), or even one who goes there 
only occasionally, you cannot have 
helped often seeing a rather tall, 
thin fellow with a cane come in, 
take down a book, and read deeply 
by the hour, entirely oblivious of 
hammering radiators, fussing, and 
other common forms of library di- 
vertissement. 

You yourself probably know very 
little about him and. unless your 
curiositv is aroused, never will, for 
Dou2 is one of the shy. reticent kind 

■ 7 • 1 

who welcome companionsliip but 
hesitate to go in search of it. 

But if perchance you are lucky 
enough to have your curiosity 
aroused, and do get to know Doug, 
you will find him a hard-working, 
conscientious fellow with a charm- 
ing personality and a great big 
smile. 



MALCOLM R. LONGSHORE 
8203 Cedar Road, Elkins Park, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 
AT 
Mally is one of those fortunate 
people who never seem to get ex- 
cited or perturbed about anything. 
Come what may, he always main- 
tains his calm and unconcerned de- 
meanor. This is quite an accom- 
plishment, for Mally is Assistant 
Business Manager of the Halcyon 
and if there is an3thing to shatter 
a mans composure, it's trying to 
wrest ads from hardened and skep- 
tical business men. But don't think 
for a minute that just because he is 
calm in the midst of confusion that 
he holds himself aloof from campus 
activities. He has a part in most 
everything that goes on around col- 
lege, from singing in the Glee Club 
to amorous adventures in the vicin- 
ity of Parrish. In fact, Mally is 
known hereabouts as one of our all- 
around young men and he deserves 
the reputation. 



106 



ALEX J. McCLOSKEY, Jr. 
600 West Ninth Street, Chester, Pa. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Darvvin was right. Or if it wasn't 
Darwin, whoever thought up the 
idea — hut we are going astray, for 
this is a sketch of the history and 
personal attrihutes of Alexander 
McCloskey, junior, manager, stu- 
dent, demon of the stage, and gen- 
eral raiser of the well-known fire 
and hrimstone. 

The annals of the Curtain Thea- 
tre would indeed he hare were it 
not for the Lon Chaney of Swarth- 
more Thespians, whose mere en- 
trance upon a scene, be it in raccoon, 
quilting or frock coat always hrings 
a gasp of horror from the audience, 
for well they know that once Alex 
appears some deviltry must be 
afoot. 

Of course his reputation as a 
B.M.O.C. comes from his bent for 
managing, which includes the base- 
ball team and this Halcyon as well 
as the fair sex. 





N. HUGH McDIARMID, 

255 Seventy-fourth St., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ECONOMICS 

AT 

This is Hugh McDiarmid. of the 
low, calm voice, quiet, unruffled dis- 
position, and modest studious air. 
Despite these handicaps, Mac 
attained fame and fortune in his 
nightly carousals through B section, 
occupying a prominent position on 
the freshman entertainment com- 
mittee. But his ability in this 
respect was further developed by 
his entertaining in out of the way 
comers in Parrish, where he was 
really in his native element. Mac's 
talents, though, do not lay wholly 
along social lines — he is a letterman 
in football, basketball, and tennis; 
and 'tis said, moreover, that he 
revived the quaint old English cus- 
tom of punctuating one's athletic 
endeavors with more or less ani- 
mated exclamation points. 




MARY EMMA McKENZIE, 

824 North 63rcl Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOTAJNY 

AAT 

"The world is so full of a number 
of things, 

I'm sure we should all be as 
happy as kings!" — or queens, too, I 
suppose. Honestly though, these 
happy people are rather scarce and 
when you do find one you're in 
luck. Mary is one of them. Every- 
thing she does, especially the things 
in the Science Building and over 
week-ends, she enjoys. Now, don't 
misunderstand me — she's not a 
Pollyanna sort of girl. But let me 
give you a tip. If you want to hear 
a really cheery laugh, and to have 
the best sort of a friend, you can't 
afford to overlook Mary. 



MARGARET McCURLEY 

MALTBIE 

2030 St. Paul bt., Baltimore, Md. 

CHEMISTRY HONORS 

<t>JI 

"Say, little girl, you're not a 'him'. 

Why do they call you 'Mac'?" 
"Because my hair is short and trim 

And always combed straight back. 

Then besides I like white ducks 
And sometimes overalls, too; 

And if hockey season is over — 
Shucks ! 
Why basketball will do!" 

"What is your formula, Chemistry, 
'Mac'? 
What kept you from growing 
tall?" 
"It's not what I've got, it's what I 
lack, 
But no one can find that at all!" 




108] 



^r^ 



KENNETH ALEXANDER 

MEIKLEJOHN 

2002 Chamberlain Ave., 

Madison, Wis. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

esn 

'"Dr. B , I would like to ques- 
tion that point. I object to your 



." The class is startled. Then 

realizing that Ken is present, it 
settles down to continued lethargy, 
for it has become accustomed to 
interruptions of this kind on the 
part of the young philosopher from 
Wisconsin. No point of philosoph- 
ical dispute has ever been known to 
pass unchallenged before Meikle- 
john. His classroom assaults have 
made professors dread him and stu- 
dents laud him. Present philosoph- 
ical classes mourn his advance to 
Honors work, for much of the spice 
of disputes has thus vanished from 
the classroom. But you may won- 
der; what is the philosophy of this 
young man? Above all, it is pro- 
gressive in dancing, dates and 

discussion. 




^ 




MORTON AUBREY MILNE, 

792.5 B St., Fox Chase, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

ezn 

Mort Milne — 

He slides a mean trombone in the 

band — 

He plays in the Garnet Serenaders — 

He likes the co-eds — 

He leads cheers — 

He sings bass — 

He fusses — 

He walks — 

He talks — 

He sleeps. 



[109] 





THOMAS SHYROCK NICELY, 

424 South Forty-seventh St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

ENGINEERING 

Curly haired, blue eyed, fusser, 

athlete, and scholar. 
Doesn't seem possible for anyone 

but Tom, does it? 
But why Tom? Oh, he's different. 
Yes, Tom is different, 

for Tom came to Swarthmore: 

to play tennis "captain.' 

to be an engineer "two point.' 

to write. . ."Handbook," "Phoenix.' 

to sing "Glee Club.' 

to dance "he rates.' 

to fuss "ask the co-eds 

Yes, Tom is sure different. 



THOMAS RICHARD MOORE 
Riverton, New Jersey 

ENGINEERING 

<J>2K 

Q. Who is Richard Moore? 

A. An engineering student at 
Swarthmore College. 

Q. Why is he taking engineering? 

A. He is going to build a bridge. 

Q. W'here will he build this bridge? 

A. He says it will run from Swarth- 
more to Delanco, New Jersey. 

Q. Why will it run to Delanco? 

A. So he can go there oftener on 
week-ends. 

Q. Why does be want to go there on 
week-ends? 

A. Well we aren't sure; jjiit he said 
something about his heart being 
forever imprisoned in that be- 
loved spot. 

Q. Is there any hope for poor 
Richard? 

A. Absolutely none. 





[110] 



MARY ANN OGDEN, 
3332 N. Penn St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

ENGLISH 

KKr 

Oh, for the days men were poets, 
and spoke and looked and acted in 
rhyme! We would write a sonnet 
scintillating with sunshine, with a 
sparkle for a comma, and we 
wouldn't need a period, hecause we 
couldn't stop ! We'd write two son- 
nets — one with curly dark hair, and 
one with hlonde hair and the 
sunniest smile on earth. \ou might 
think it would take an epic to tell 
about Lady Mary Ann and the web 
of happiness and light-heartedness 
she keeps spun about herself and all 
near her in Swarthmore-land. But 
it seems that oftenest the loveliest 
things are said in the fewest words, 
or even just felt, mutely. That's 
how Mary Ann is. 





HENRY LIPPINCOTT PARRISH, 
901 Thomas Ave., Riverton, N. J. 

ECONOMICS 

The boy that gets a whole page pic- 
ture in the New York papers. 

The hoy that came within two-fifths 
of a second of breaking the 
intercollegiate low-hurdles rec- 
ord. 

The boy that helps the relay team 
to victory. 

The boy that has an eagle eye for 
the basket. 

The boy who plays football in the 
fall because he has nothing else 
to do. 

The boy the boys envy for his grace. 

The boy any college would be 
proud of. 

The boy. 



^3 





EDWARD M. PASSMORE, 
629 West Granite St., Butte, Mont. 

ECONOMICS 

"In-the-evening-by-the-moonlight" 
— Shoes descend from the windows 
of unappreciative Honors students; 
Wharton wits wax wise. But the 
singers are inidaunted; "You-can- 
hear-those-dar-kies-singing." Sighs 
from above. After all it wasn't so 
bad. Just the Montana Cowboy 
with some of his harmoniacs, call- 
ing to their mates. 

But even on such a musician as 
Eddy palling with cows on a West- 
ern ranch cannot be without its 
effect. Nothing but lassoing fiery 
bulls in a round-up could have 
given him such skill with a lacrosse 
stick, and his taste for taking hard 
knocks on the gridiron could have 
come only from unceremoniously 
leaving the backs of untamed mus- 
tangs on the lone prairie. Crude 
country, this Montana, but it cer- 
tainly delivers the goods. 



WILLIAM POOLE 

1311 Clayton Street, 

Wilmington, Delaware 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

■tAe 

"A silent woman is a gift of God 

and a serious man " is William 

Poole. Bill is the finest modern 
exemplar of masculine virtue. To 
be serious, nowadays, is truly a vir- 
tue, not often acquired by the mas- 
culine gender with the exception, 
possibly, in affairs of love. To our 
limited knowledge Bill is not in the 
dangerous predicament of love. 
Then, too, a prerequisite for serious- 
ness is nothing less than steady 
plugging and hard work. Having 
not only passed and passed cred- 
itably his prerequisites for honors 
works, but also for seriousness, 
last year Bill crashed through with 
several three-point averages and 
also the election to the assistant 
managership of soccer. 




112 



SARAH HOPPER POWELL. 
130 E. 70th St., New York, N. Y. 

FINE ARTS HONORS 

KAe 

D'jever have the mumps? Well, 
Sally's sort of like that — she's fright- 
fully contagious, and when she's 
around you just can't think of an- 
otlier thing l)ut Sally. She's the 
kind -of a girl — well, you know — the 
kind you glance at furtively when 
you aren't sure which knife to use. 
She's the kind you chase when you 
want opera singing done at 2\(-> 
laughs per second. When you see 
her riding a liorse you think of old 
English prints. Perhaps you've 
noticed how outrageously noisy she 
is — darn queer, these society — 
ladies! You can't hold her down — 
she's always popping up and acting 
up. Nothing we can say really does 
her justice — 

She's just our Sally! 





MANSON RADFORD 
527 Montgomery Ave., 

Bryn Mawr, Penn. 
SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

4>K2 

Manson Radford, like scrapple 
and syrup, appears around college 
ahout two days out of every seven. 
He drops aroimd in the afternoons 
of those two days for his honors 
seminaries, and then with never a 
liackward glance returns to the 
labyrinths and catacombs of Bryn 
Mawr. He spent his first two col- 
legiate years at the University of 
Pennsylvania, where he joined the 
Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity. His 
next two years were spent at the 
U. S. Naval Academy, and he is 
now at Swarthmore taking our 
world-famous Englisli honors course. 
We consider him quite a model hon- 
ors student, for he doesn't get dates 
with our girls when we have to pre- 
pare for classes. 



[ 113 ] 




MARGARET DEXTER READ 
5108 Chester Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

KKr 

The next on the program is Mar- 
garet Read, usually known as Peg. 
Peg is a day-student this year and 
we only see her at odd moments 
when she slinks in looking like a 
^ ogue model. The freshmen look 
around with their jaws dropped and 
think "^ hat ho, what ho — how did 
we miss this?" And so it goes in 
life. ^ e see something good — 
which we want to see lots of — and 
then she's a dav-student. 



ROBERT BRITTAIN REDMAN, 
608 ^'est Lockhart St., Sayre, Pa. 

ECOTS'OMICS 

<i>Ae 

Bob Redman is one of the most 
dyed-in-the-wool B section bam- 
boozlers that Swarthmore has seen 
in a long time. He is a real "triple 
threat" man and liis three favorite 
threats have to do with women, 
waiting on table and threatening to 
work: however, he is a verj' peace- 
able gentleman and never carries 
out his threats. 

^ hen he was a freshman he 
started out on the paths of glory 
and now has become a superior 
football player, a mean guard at 
basketball, as well as a wearer of 
the Garnet S that he earned by- 
catching on the baseball team last 
spring. Besides all this Bob has 
lots of time for his friends, and inci- 
dentally has them in numbers and 
no small numliers either. 




114 



MARION SMEDLEY REYNOLDS, 
Malvern, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

xn 

We don't see Smed very often 
around college over the week-ends, 
and I'll tell you why. As soon as 
classes are over on Friday, she packs 
up and goes home to Malvern; then 
no one sees her again until the time 
for first hours on Monday morning. 
By the way, first hours are one of 
the few tilings Smed doesn't like. 
She doesn't like to study, either, yet 
she always manages to come through 
on top. 

There're lots of things she does 
like though. A cold windy day for 
a long walk, a good crowd of cirls 
to have a jolly time with, and an in- 
vitation to do something nice. "Oh 
I have to study," says Smed, yet she 
usually manages to go. She likes 
to argue too, and I've heard she has 
come through victorious more than 
once. 





ANNA MARGARET RICKARDS 
810 Prospect Ave., Moore, Pa. 

HISTORY 

Rickie has descended from a long 
far-famed line of athletes, and has 
lived up to the family rep. Her 
manipulation of a hockey stick is 
equaled only hy her excellence in 
basketball shots, and she is as indis- 
pensable to a Swarthmore athletic 
team as sun is to day, and as Parrish 
is to Wharton. Her finest assets are 
a charming smile and personality, 
and a sense of fair play toward all, 
which have led to her election as 
captain of the 1929 hockey team. 
As a true and loyal friend Rickie is 
unrivaled. 




EDWARD JOHN ROTH, 

4400 Cathedral Ave., 

Washington, D. C. 

ENGINEERING 

The photographer had to perform 
the task of separating the insep- 
arahle hefore he could secure the 
handsome p o rt r a i t reproduced 
above. People said the thing 
wouldn't look like Eddie Roth un- 
less we had Paul Smith standing 
beside him; but we figured that 
wasn't done in the best regulated 
Halcyons, and decided to put the 
boys apart just for once. If anyone 
doesn't recognize the alleged like- 
ness, we hope he can read the name 
printed below it. 

Eddie's chief hobbies are pal-ing 
around with Smith, and studying 
engineering. He gets his exercise in 
the hand-ball court, and on the 
Wharton touch-football gridiron. 
He was also a reporter for the pub- 
licity committee until he l)ecame 
too absorbed in playing with cal- 
culus and doing tricks with the 
slide rule. 



LAWRENCE M. RUSSELL, 
632 St. John's Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

ENGLISH 

AT 

Behold — Lawrence "Mush" Rus- 
sell, erstwhile lacrosse star and stu- 
dent extraordinary at Swarthmore 
College. Between vacations he tries 
studying for his health, though one 
must confess that it's not bis fault 
that life isn't one big doctor's bill. 
Not to imply that he is not a busy 
man — Mush finds entertainment 
other than lacrosse and lessons. But 
a weakness for Education can hide 
a multiplicity of virtues — here at 
Swarthmore we learn not to judge 
a man by a smooth exterior alone. 
Musb. we think, is one of the re- 
served and distant kind — just a 
pleasant nod to mere acquaintances, 
but a warm heart for bis friends. 




EVA SCARLET, 

142 West Market Street, 
West Chester, Penna. 

ENGLISH 

IIB'1> 

Who knows Eve? 

We 

All 

Do and 

We 

Say 

She's a peach. 

Pep? Sure 

Fun? Plenty 

Clever? Yes 

Good Sport 

0. K. 

Does she study? 

Well 

Yes 

But Then 

She 

Has 

Good Times, too! 



E 

v' 

E 





FREDERiav C. SHREIBER, 
1361 S. W. Seventh St., Miami, Fla. 

PHYSIOLOGY HONORS 

Fred is one of the most conscien- 
tious boys in the junior class — there 
is not a trace of dust on his books. 
As an honors student, and especially 
a physiology honors student, he 
spends most of his time at work, 
and can be seen any afternoon 
dashing from one science building 
to another in quest of a seminar. 
But not all his hours are spent in 
scanning well-thumbed pages — his 
little white cap is as well known on 
the Wharton tennis courts as his 
technique is in Qualitative Lab; 
and every Saturday night he is sure 
to have a date at the tearoom. Fred 
also deserves mention as one of the 
select few who have lived in B sec- 
tion and still remained students — 
how and why we do not know. 




S*f^aE«3T^=SS?SB^ 




k 



KATHARINE SMEDLEY, 

Cornwall. N. \. 
HISTORY HONORS 

KAO 

Slie's swinging along with a light, 
free step, is Kay; out for her daily, 
you know, getting fresh air. and 
pretty views, and seeing that there 
are horizons. You always feel that 
she has kept them. too. just to bring 
out when you get all cramped up be- 
ing the littler you. And then comes 
Kay — a whiff of ^vholesome fresh 
air; one thovight that is bracing and 
thrilling, like an unexpected land- 
scape; and then her gorgeous sweep 
that takes you out and out — 'way 
off into the Should-Be world, where 
there are Kays — and room enough 
to breathe. 



PAUL CECIL SMITH 

317 Warwick Road, 

Haddonfield Road, N. J. 

ENGINEERING 
KS 

There was a time when the after- 
dinner line of hopeful gallants at 
the telephone booth might have 
considered themselves lucky to have 
seen Paul C. Smith hold his semi- 
annual conversation over the wire. 
And if they had hstened they might 
have heard " — Uli — hello — the 
Kappa Sig-ma dance is to-night — 
and — orb — , — I wondered — if — 
you'd — uh — ". But fate plays 
strange pranks. Smithy's drawl 
now rolls out by the hour to the 
waiting crowd outside. 

The tragedy occurred only re- 
centlv when Smitty was seen stealth- 
ily following bis forehead out of 
the dining room one morning with- 
out the usual apple in his hand I 
Strenuous measures were taken at 
once to cure the wound, but too 
late. Cupid's arrow had struck its 
mark. \ es, it's a queer world — 
where woman haters fall in love and 
a South Jersey drawl engineers the 
world. 




MARGARET E. SPENCER 
810 W. 25th Street, Wilmington, Del. 

ENGLISH 

<!>M 

Pat is most vivacious, 

Pat is most loquacious, 

Pat is neat and tidy as a pin; 

She goes one-act playing. 

Never goes a-straying. 

Anything against the rules is sin. 

Pat reads by the hour. 
We've never seen her glower. 
We've never even seen her in a 

gloom ; 
Great the pleasures that she finds. 
And we hear she never grinds, 
Pat's the girl you like around the 

room. 






HELEN GEORGIA STAFFORD 
151 E. James St., Lancaster, Pa. 

MATHEMATICS HONORS 

Helen is a Junior, 

An Honor student too ! 
She'll walk with you, or talk with 
you. 

And cheer you when you're blue. 
She's glad to have you visit. 

If you once sit down, you'll stay — 
And there before you know it 

An hour's passed away! 



•"s^ 



MARIAN STALEY, 

205 W. Garden St., Rome, N. Y. 

ENGLISH 

HB* 

Did you ever hear of anyone wlio 
had all her friends convinced that 
she was a nice, quiet, studious girl 
and then surprise them by going 
out to everything and knowing 
everybody? Who never let it be 
known she was a musician until we 
discovered her violin? Who ap- 
peared with long hair one day and 
a boyish bob the next? Who lived 
in Rome and yet could go home 
from college for the week-end? 
Well, Staley can do all these things, 
in fact, she has done them. 



fn 



JOSEPHINE STECKEL, 
Bloomfield, Iowa 

ENGLISH HONORS 
HB* 

Where's Jo? Here's a piano. 
Where's Jo? It's Hamburg Show 
time. Where's Joe? We want to 
dance! Here she is! Jo is our trans- 
fer from Iowa, who came to the lit- 
tle Quaker college with such musi- 
cal ability in her finger tips that she 
is constantly in demand, wherever 
there is a group of girls and a piano. 
Jo can't speak without saying funny, 
clever things. And under her blond 
hair lies such a brain that she 
doesn't only take honors, she takes 
extra classes too! And can she 
swim? Ask me! Yes, that's Jo — 
just funny, clever, witty, musical 
Jo from Iowa. 



1120] 



JOHN H. STOKES, 
27 Oberlin Road, Swartlimore, Pa. 

PHYSIOLOGY 
AT 
Mary Lyon School, 
September 30, 1928. 
Dear Mother: 

We had another dance last night, 
and oh, I met the nicest hoy! He's 
frorii the college, or at least he stays 
around there quite a lot. I guess 
he conies down here pretty often, 
too. I mean the other girls say so. 

He's short and smiles at you all 
the time in an awfully thrilling 
way. He had a sort of five-edged 
gold plate hanging from his watch 
chain and it said "Kwink" on it; 
whatever that is. Some of the other 
boys said it meant that he was man- 
ager of track, or that he wasn't, 
something about manager. Wouldn't 
that slay you? 

There were some other hoys from 
the college here, too. They all came 
when Johnnie came and left when 
he left. I guess he's pretty popular 
up there. Anyway he said he was. 
Your loving daughter. 



^1 iittf- 





VIRGINIA BARNES STRATTON 

402 Hickory St., Neosho, Mo. 

MATHEMATICS 

AT 

What's become of Ginny? 

Nothing at all: 

It's just that she isn't 

Frightfully tall . . . 

And when you see a Pooh-bear, 

A small brown Pooh-bear 

Twinkling in a corner or 

Bouncing down the street — 

It mightn't he a Pooh-liear, — 

It might he Ginny ! 

(So don't be surprised 

— or scared — 
Cause Ginny 

is 

darn 

cute ! ) 



[121 




PAUL THEODORE STRONG, 

815 Peach St., Vineland, N. J. 

ZOOLOGY — PHYSIOLOGY 

You see it was this way. When 
the editor sent fhe scribe to inter- 
view Bud Strong, it looked like an 
easy job. Having heard the fellow's 
name mentioned before, he figured 
it would be pretty simple to write 
him up. He went up to his room, 
and didn't mind waiting two hours 
for Bud to get back from football 
practice. The scribe sat patiently 
while Strong worked on his basket- 
liall schedule, hut when put off an- 
other three hours for his scholar- 
ship work, the thing began to get 
tiresome. And when Strong started 
to attend to some Student Govern- 
ment business, and said he had to 
go to the Little Theatre Club play 
rehearsal later, the scribe quit. 




JOSEPH THOMAS SULLIVAN, 
8134 Cedar Road, Elkins Park, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

AT 

D'jever hear of Mary Sullivan, the 
first woman editor of the Phoenix? 
Well, this is her kid brother; only 
when little Joe came to school he 
didn't want to make the thing a 
family affair, so he started out to 
scoop athletic honors. Just as if he 
didn't get enough exercise plugging 
up a big hole in the football line, 
he plays defense on the varsity la- 
crosse team. In spite of the fact 
that he cracks half a dozen heads 
every season with healthy swings of 
his lacrosse stick, he is one of the 
best natured fellows in college. 

Some people believe that Joe 
studies; but no one has ever seen 
him indulge in this scholarly occu- 
pation. He seems to have the pro- 
fessors fooled too, though, because 
he's always on the safe side when 
marks come out. 




122 



HENRY GEORGE SWAIN, 
13 Everett St., East Orange, N. J. 

MATHEMATICS HOiVORS 

Wharton Qiib 
If, at any time in your college 
career, you are baffled by a problem 
in mathematics ( and who hasn't 
been? I, just drop your books and 
step over to E Section. Pause just 
inside the door and listen very 
carefully. If you hear (among other 
things ) the tinkle-tinkle-tunk of a 
mandolin, you will know that Swain 
is at home, and that your worries 
are over, for Henry sure does know 
his math and will help you out of 
your troubles. If you stay a little 
while longer, he may tell you about 
the part he took in "Hugh the 
Drover," but we doubt it, for 
Henry is a silent chap and not in 
the habit of talking about himself. 
But it's true just the same — we saw 
his name in the program ourselves! 




CLARA BOND TAYLOR 
Swarthmore, Pa. 

ZOOLOGY-PHYSIOLOGY HONORS 

Clara is one of those inside peo- 
ple — not that she's always inside 
her books, because sometimes she's 
inside her car — and that means out. 
But when she's inside the lab, there 
are all sorts of peculiar creatures that 
she gets into: the secret corners of 
fishes, and the mystery of the cat's 
meow. And when she's inside your 
room and you want to tell somebody 
your troulDles, she's inside of them, 
too, and you don't have to talk a 
lot. Besides, she's going to be a 
doctor, and has a knack of doing 
helpful things to the cut finger, or 
the skinned knee. And inside of 
Clara? Perhaps just Clara knows 
that, too! 



123 ] 



f, 




JACKSON TAYLOR 
209 Yale Avenue., Swarthmore, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

KS 

If you, gentle reader, are a bridge 
demon sighing for new worlds to 
conquer we suggest that you drop 
in at "A" Section, or the Kappa 
Sigma lodge and ask for Jack Tay- 
lor. Or you might just walk by the 
window and glance at the bridge 
table, for if he's tliere, he'll be play- 
ing with the pasteboards. And 
after the defeat take a walk, or 
write a "Public Opinion" for the 
Phoenix, but don't feel too discour- 
aged. 

Of course, we all know Swartli- 
more's the best little college in 
America, but Jack says you really 
have to try a few others to know 
what a good place it is. In the 
matter of co-eds, though, he seems 
to think differently, at least if dates 
have anything to do with it. 



MARY BEAUMONT TEMPLE 
6 Park Ave., Swarthmore 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 
IIB* 

Mary is 
/llways either 
/Running her 
Youthful (?) Ford, 

Talking pacifism. 
Educating a hockey ball, 
/l/aking high averages. 
Public speaking. 
Lightly divine, or 
Else^— ! 




^^m 



[1241 




HAROLD B. THOMPSON, 
Basking Ridge, New Jersey 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

<!>Ae 

Tommy always greets you with a 
curt hello and a sharp glance from 
his keen eyes. At first you are a lit- 
tle concerned, and wonder what 
you have done to offend him; hut 
aftfer a while you learn that it is 
just his way^perhaps it's New Jer- 
sey, perhaps it's reading for honors, 
more prohahly it's just liimself. 
Where Tommy keeps himself has 
always been more or less of an enig- 
ma, for at most any hour of the day 
or night liis name is shouted on the 
Quad, and no answering voice comes 
from within. He doesn't spend 
much time on dates (though what 
he does he considers well-spent), 
nor do athletics occupy many of his 
precious hours. If you were to ask 
him where he stayed — well, perhaps 
he'd tell you, and perhaps you'd 
find out for yourself. 





JOSEPHINE TREMAINE, 

8 Bryant St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

ENGLISH 

xn 

Josephine's littler than J-o-s-e- 

p-h-i-n-e is, 
She's really hardly big enough for 

.1-0! 
But you'd think she was just as big 

as J-o-s-e-p-h-i-n-e T-r-e-m-a-i-n-e 
The way she makes things go. 

She can dance and she can hockey. 

And you'd think she'd get quite 
cocky 

Over contemplating all her B's and 
A's. 

And the way that girl can act! — 

Well really, it's a fact 

That for her size she has most tak- 
ing ways! 

Josephine's littler than J-o-s-e- 
p-h-i-n-e is. 

She's really hardly big enough for 
J-o: 

She must have an awfully hard 
time bearing up 

'Cause we all dote on her so ! 



^m 



[125 



^ 




p/^ 




HOWARD HAINES TURNER, 

28 Monroe Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Every once in a while we meet 
Haines and he doesn't give us that 
cheerful friendly smile that makes 
the girls in Parrish arrange their 
programs so that they might have a 
dance with him. Then we know 
that Haines is not in the world of to- 
day, but is planning the political 
campaigns of 1932 and 1936. There 
was no douI)t in Haines mind as to 
who would win the past election, he 
had told us the outcome long be- 
fore election day. So now Haines 
is busy figuring out the coming elec- 
tion. 

But Haines doesn't spend all his 
time on politics. Every afternoon 
during the fall we see him on the 
football field with a pad and pencil 
and a newspaperman's critical ap- 
praising look; for you see, he is also 
a high-powered publicity agent for 
his Alma Mater. 



SELINA E. TURNER, 
710 E. 20th St., Chester, Pa. 

FRENCH 

*M 

Selina girlie sell dumfound. Tur- 
ner ounce ear. Cheese garter fish 
and see. Yukon see tatter solis maid 
fur business. Fuel watcher yule 
fiender very companionable. Cheese 
gotten ice disposition, to. 
Translation. — So lean a girl is sel- 
dom found. Turn around and see 
her. She's got efficiency. You can 
see that her soul is made for busi- 
ness. If you'll watch her you'll find 
her very companionable. She's got 
a nice disposition, too. 




[ 126 



MILDRED L. UNDERWOOD 
609 Mahontonga St., Pottsville, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

KKr 

This little model above, moddum. 
'^}/C/^ Here you have something both use- 
y IffyC fill ^nd beautiful. The goods — yes, 

fine and a lovely weave. Not loud, 
no — but it takes your eye and you 
realize you really have something. 
You take some of these creations 
nowadays. They look all right in the 
beginning, l)ut they don't wear. Put 
them to a strain and snap, — they 
are gone in a minute. This creation 
is one of the best we have. You 
couldn't order one to be made any 
better. You can't go wrong with 
this for either work or play. 





HAROLD E. WAGNER, 
Darien, Conn. 

ECONOMICS 

Behold; 
The Great Stone Face; 
Meditation; Mystery; 
Silence that laughs at 
The affairs of men and 
Meditation that comes 
From experience. Not that 
There's any real relation 
Between Way and "The Old 
Man of the Mountain," but 
You know you simply can't see 
One without thinking of the 
Other. And yet it's all so 
Absurd. Who ever heard of 
The Great Stone Face play- 
ing football, wielding a 
Lacrosse stick, selling 
Neckties or shining with 
The co-eds? No there must 
Be some mistake. But the 
Resemblance is there, you 
Can't deny it. 
The Great Stone 
Face. 



[127] 





STANLEY IRVING WINDE, 
215 James Street, Waukesha, Wis. 

ENGINEERING HONORS 

<i>Ae 

From Wisconsin to Wharton 
came Winde, the engineer. His 
freshman class took to him at once 
(as all freshman classes have done 
since I and elected him president. 
Last year he was elected to Kwink 
and now he lives in B Section, 
a spot of quiet and study and sanity 
in that inferno of warring sopho- 
mores and freshmen. And hewil- 
dered engineers sit at his feet to 
catch the pearls of engineering wis- 
dom that fall from his mouth. 

In accordance with the true west- 
ern tradition, Stan is rather silent, 
hut when he does open his mouth, 
the output is usually worth listen- 
ing to. Our Parrish correspondent 
assures us that practically every 
co-ed in Swarthmore has tried at 
one time or another to win him, hut 
whether they have succeeded or not, 
only Stan knows and, naturally, he 
won't tell. 



DOROTHY FRANCES WOLF, 
Garden City, Chester, Pa. 

LATIN HONORS 

*M 

Hear ye ! Hear ye ! Presenting 
Dorothy Wolf, the only living para- 
dox! A real scholar (doesn't a La- 
tin Honors constitute a scholar?) 
with a sense of humor. Examine 
her closely. She has plain hrown 
hair (so she says) and a Great Un- 
willingness to go to bed at night, 
and a Greater Unwillingness to get 
up in the morning, and a Good Dis- 
position (so ive say). She is an 
Open Scholarship girl who interest- 
ed herself in debating to the extent 
of becoming assisting manager, and 
turning literary, became junior edi- 
tor of the Halcyon. And with all 
this, ladies and gentlemen, she has 
retained her secret passion for puns. 




[128] 



JOHN SHARPLESS WORTH, 
St. Davids Avenue, St. Davids, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

Right here, Mr. Reader, we have 
caught J. S. Worth of C-3 in a very 
pleasing pose. Strangely, he is not 
studying accounting, leading cheers, 
playing the banjo, or fretting about 
Hamburg Shows or Glee Clubs, but 
he has nonchalantly flicked the ash 
from his Murad and settled down 
complacently to allow the photog- 
rapher to train his camera upon 
him. It is very gratifying to the 
editors of this journal that they 
have been so successful in spiriting 
Mr. Worth away to the studio. 

Even in the end they couldn't get 
him away from his friend Dick 
Moore. Perhaps if you look very 
closely you will discern that per- 
son's features in the background. 
Dick seems amused at his com- 
panion's situation, but the tables 
will soon be turned because the 
photographer has a date with him 
next. 





ORVILLE R. WRIGHT, 
3401 Clifton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

ECONOMICS 

Orville Wright — his loves are three: 
A date — 

Tearoom every night (almost), 
table parties in between, formals 
every other week. If Orville must 
go out, it is only to be expected 
that he do the job right. 
A game — 

"The Play's the Thing," either 
from the sidelines or out on the 
field. Orv is proud of his lacrosse 
letter; this year will mean an- 
other one. 
A friend — 

Not a great many men are so- 
ciably as well as socially inclined 
— our subject combines the best 
virtues of both. 
What else you ask. Not much — a 
big heart, a modest bearing, a hap- 
py face — isn't that enough? 



129] 




ELIZABETH YARD, 
] 812 Chicago Avenue, Evaiiston, III. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

xn 

When God made Elizaheth. he 
made her to helong on a velvet 
couch, melting into cushions, play- 
ing with a crystal hall. There really 
ought to he incense, too. and a 
tinkle of Chinese music, and per- 
haps a suggestion of poetry. But 
she can manage quite well, when 
necessary, with a cigarette and a 
moon, and a shading of jazz in the 
hackground. It's the melting that 
does it. One quite forgets, to see 
her. that after all she is a Swarth- 
more honors student, with a two- 
point average, and voted for Smith! 



JAY YONG YANG, 
Wahiawa Oahu, Hawaiian Islands 

ENGINEERING 

Local talent educated Jay Yong 
Yang in the McKinley High School, 
Honolulu, hut this was not suffi- 
cient. Jay decided that the East and 
West, the twain, sliould meet. At- 
tracted by the advanced methods of 
the Western Hemisphere's educa- 
tion. Jay entered Drexel and soon 
transferred to Swarthmore. 

Jay is an engineer and as engin- 
eers are on afternoons, he is huried 
in one of the science buildings, solv- 
ing mechanical riddles wliich he 
might never have seen at home. He 
has developed into a good student 
and his loyalty to his work has af- 
forded him with a complete knowl- 
edge of American education. 




130 I 




LOUISE KINSEY YERKES 
4852 Kenwood Ave., Chicago, 111. 

FINE ARTS HONORS 

KAe 

Louise has a sparkle that crinkles 
lip her eyes. And I know what it's 
about! \ ou see, Louise forgot all 
about growing up — until once, just 
all of a sudden, she remembered it 
in a great hurry, and did it — very. 
And somehow I have a feeling that 
if she forgot, if she ran and ran in 
the wind till her clickety heels and 
hairpins were gone, and her cheeks 
were all bright and noljody at all 
was near to make her remember — 
why, she'd only be eleven-and-a- 
half! 

But Louise won't run and run in 
the wind. I think she likes hairpins 
and clickety heels and oh, she does 
them beautifully, because she's 
clever. Perhaps, after all, it's nice 
to be grown up and be an honors 
student and an Associate Editor. 



RALPH WICKERSHAM YODER, 

8411 106th St., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

ECONOMICS 

Ever since Ralph came to College 
he has been known as "The Duke," 
which would seem to prove that he 
is one of nature's noblemen. His 
chief hobby is managing things, 
and he spends most of his time 
hunting ads for the Phoenix. Ralph 
also "manages" his studies for a 
good average every semester. In 
his sophomore year he took care of 
the business end of the Y. M. C. A. 
handbook, and saw that all the 
freshmen received their rules and 
regulations on time. He was a 
football player, too, until the cares 
of a business man forced him to 
drop the daintier things of life. 
Now he tries lacrosse as a diversion. 




^m 



131 



Ex^Stei 



Alice Calista Atkinson 
Adaline Blackburn 
Charles Brooks Blaisdell 
Barton Calvert 
Frances Bates Coles 
Robert C. DaCosta, Jr. 
Robert Shaw Eikenberry 
Virginia Burrough Fell 
Willard Winchell Grant 
Anna Livingston Hanan 
Helen Lanius Harry 
Alice Casey Hay 
Helen Blanche Heacock 
Charles Enos Hepford 
Charles Coombs Huston 
Ellis Lewis Jacob 



Yura Alberta Kawakami 
Jane Romine Large 
Walter La Tour 
Eugene Harold Mercer 
Lewis R. Minster 
Mildred Gibson Muir 
George Cecil Sherman 
J. Stewart Smith 
Eloise C. Suhrie 
Dwight Turner Thompson 
Ferris Thomsen 
Ralph W. Tipping 
Mary Perkins Trimble 
Myra Frances Vickery 
Abner Goodwin Walter 
WilUam Wallace Welsh- 



L132 1 




[133 ] 




[134 ] 




[135] 



Members of the Class of 1931 



t 



Helen Margaret Andrews, History, AF Woodstown, N. J. 

Joseph Laurence Atkinson, Economics, AY Woodstown, N. J. 

Lincoln Atkiss, Economics, K2 166 W. Mt. Pleasant Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Priscilla Alden Bacon, KKF 86 B St., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Clifford Carl Baker, Biology, $SK 800 Elmer St., Vineland, N. .1. 

Arthur Frank Baldwin, Social Science, $A0 R. F. D. 3, Ridgefield, Conn. 

William Ingrin Battin, Engineering 530 E. Johnson St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Marguerite Emma Baur, English 1026 Westview St., Mt. Airy, Phila., Pa. 

Beatrice Fullerton Beach, English, KA0 504 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

Richard Oliver Bender, Chemistry, 0Sn 512 Thayer St., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Katherine Hodgers Bennett, $M 131 Watchung Ave., Montclair, N. J. 

Mary Elizabeth Betts, Political Science, AAT Doylestown, Pa. 

Clement Miller Biddle, Jr., Economics, <I)K^F Laurel Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

William Blum, Jr., Chemistry, <I>AA 215 Elm St., Chevy Chase, Md. 

Richard Clarkson Bond, Economics, KS Upper Darby, Pa. 

James Henry Booser, Political Science, 02n 1326 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Helen Lippincott Booth, KA0 975 Cedar Brook Rd., Plainfield, N. J. 

John M. Brecht, Physiology, $2K 539 George St., Norristown, Pa. 

Barbara Briggs, XQ 40 Prospect Drive, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Margaret Hickman Brinton, English, AF Oxford, Pa. 

Helen Caroline Brooke, History, KKF Roland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Irwin Gwynne Burton, Biology, <l)Kcp 237 N. 18th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ruth Calwell, Economics, KA0... Westview & Wisahickon Aves., Germantown, Pa. 

Thomas Seal Chambers, Chemistry 130 W. Spring St., Reading, Pa. 

Marianna Chapman, Biology, KKF Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Frank Sharp Christian, Economics, AY. Itham, Pa. 

William Henry Cleveland, Jr., English, 02 H 1229 S. Denver St., Tulsa, Okla. 

John Thomas Cohen, Engineering, $2K 117 W. 24th St., Chester, Pa. 

Ralph Libby Connor, Political Science, $A0 1 Cowdrey St., Stoneham, Mass. 

John Montgomery Cookenbach, Economics, AY 618 Merion Ave., Penfield, Pa. 

John Darlingto Corbit, Biology, <1)2K 419 Douglas St., Reading, Pa. 

William Janes Cresson, Engineering, ©211 32 Amherst Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Paul CrowL Economics, AY. 802 Far Hills Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

Margaret Genevieve Davis, English 116 N. Parkwood Blvd., Pasadena, Cal. 

Ruth Janet Davis, HBO 367 King's Highway West, Haddonfield, N. J. 

Carl Kugler Dellmuth, Polit. Science, K2 426 Chambers Ave., Camden, N. J. 

Betty Delong, English East Greenville, Pa. 

Margaret L. Dewees, XQU R. F. D. 2, Wilmington, Del. 

William Price Dowdy, Biology, AY. 816 Prospect Ave., Moore, Pa. 

William Downtown, Jr 236 Dickinson Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Ameha A. Emhardt, ITB^ 51 Westview Ave., Germantown, Pa. 

Adelaide L. Emley, KA$ 3604 Fulton St., Washington, D. C. 

Janet Elizabeth Evans, English, XQ 107 W. Ridley Ave., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Ellen Watson Fernon, XQ 1003 Arrott St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



^m 



[136: 




Louise Irene Fisher, English, IIB$ 424 Montgomery Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

Helen Rebecca Fletcher, Ar 600 Hanover St., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Lewis Fussel, Engineering, $Sn 541 Riverview Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Neville Craig Gee, Economics, K2 _ 302 Prospect St., Cranford, N. J. 

Henry Hadley, Engineering Wayne, Pa. 

Joseph Harlan, K2 2914 Garrison Blvd., Bahimore, Md. 

Natalie Harper, KA0 2314 Chestnut St., Harrisbnrg, Pa. 

Jean Elizabeth Harvey, 116$ 12 Swarthmore Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

William M. Harvey, Engineering. 55 Lackawanna Ave., East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Florence Norton Hearne, English, IIB(S} 322 Maple Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Albert L. Hood, Jr., Political Science, AY. 147 Sumac St., Wissahickon, Phila. 

Helen Murray Hoskinson, KKR 3410 Garfield St., Washington, D. C. 

Allen D. Howland, English, $2K 130 Manheim St., Germantown, Pa. 

Daiel S. Hnbbell, K2 465 Bartram Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Mary Alma Hull, Mathematics 132 Groton Ave., Cortland, N. Y. 

Elma A. Hurlock, English, KA0 63 S. Hillcrest Road, Springfield, Pa. 

Caroline A. Jackson, Social Science, KA0 6445 Greene St., Mt. Airy, Pa. 

William Alderman Jaquette, Zoology, $2K 605 Elm Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Lawrence Edward Jewett, Engineering, $2K...231 Kenyon Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

David Casper Jillson, Wharton Club Ill N. 19th St., Orange, N. J. 

William Thomas Jones, English $A0 510 S. Union St., Natchez, Miss. 

Thomas Smyth Keefer, Engineering, AY 439 S. 46th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nox. M. Kehew, 0Sn Bradford Woods, Pa. 

Kathryn E. Kerlin, KKF. Keyser, W. Va. 

Robert Edmund Kinter, Social Science, $A0 Malta Apts., Stroudsburg, Pa. 

William Eugene Kirsch, English, ^KW 5th Ave., Clementown Heights, N. J. 

Florence Kohn, English 1525 N. 16th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Helen Dorothy Lafore, English, AF Box 977, Narbertb, Pa. 

Robert Hanthorn Lamey, Engineering, $2K 422 E. 20th St., Chester, Pa. 

Thomas Willets Lapham, Social Science, $A0 Port Washington, N. Y. 

Joshua Gordon Lippincott, Engineering, $K^...2 Crane Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 

Samuel Mahon, Economics, $A0 141 E. Court St., Ottumwa, Iowa 

Florence Louise Marsh, English, $M _ Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Eleanor F. Martindale, KA0 Rosedale Ave., West Chester, Pa. 

Mildred E. Maxfield, AF 2261 N. 4th St., Columbus, Ohio 

William Stanley McCune, English, $ICF 714 E. Lake St., Petoskey, Mich. 

D. K. McGarrah, Social Science, Wharton Club, 14 Amherst Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Rogers McVaugh, Zoology, 02 H Kinderhook, N. Y. 

Jane Worthing! on Michener, Latin, KKF 229 Cornell Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Margaret Keyon Mix, EngHsh, KKF R. R. 1, Selma, Ind. 

Marjorie Carter Murdock, Polit. Science, 116$ 1372 Irene St., Lakewood, O. 

Elizabeth Reel Newcomb, XQ Buttonwood Farm, Brown Mills, N. J. 

Edwin L. Newpher, Education, Wharton Club Terre Hill, Pa. 

Miriam Nickel, English, AF 2 Melrose Ave., Colonial Hts., Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Gwendolyn Norton, English 3701 16th St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Edward Lee Noyes, a>A0 4518 Vandalia Ave., Dallas, Texas 

Charles Pierce Olton 119 Broad St., Newark, N. J. 



Margaret Caroline Orr, English, KKF 1337 E. Jackson St., Muncie, Ind. 

Mary Dixon Palmer, KA0 Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Samuel Jackson Parker, Engineering 27 E. Marshall St., West Chester, Pa. 

Ruth Anna Passmore, KA0 Glen Mills, Pa. 

Katherine Doerr Patterson, English, AAT...1333 Hunting Park Ave., Phila., Pa. 

Margaret Paxson, Zoology, XQ 311 Cedar Lane, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Barbara Wolfe Pearson, KA9 516 Walnut Lane, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Rutherford Terhune Phillips, Chemistry 3150 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Albert James Pittman. Economics, AY 7119 Wayne Ave., Upper Darby, Pa. 

C. William Potts, Engineering, AY 1013 Westview St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

David L. Price, Political Science, 0211 510 Ogden Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Charles Edmund Pugh, K2 Box 457, Haverford, Pa. 

Edith Ehzabeth Reeves, French, AF 3726 Bonsall Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Anna Mary Ridgeway 38 Alleghany Ave., Kenmore, N. Y. 

Martha Roberts, KA0 Moorestown, N. J. 

Walter Hadley Robinson 411 College Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Leon Augustus Rushmore, Engineering, $A0 Roslyn, N. Y. 

Esther Seaman, French, AF 1605 Broome St., Wilmington, Del. 

Edward Reynolds Seyburn, Engineering, $A0 Patterson, La. 

Clara Lucretia Sigman, History, AF 3300 N. Bouvier St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Daniel Sinclair, Economics, ^KW 537 Buttonwood St., Norristown, Pa. 

John Perry Skinner, Engineering, <^KW 81 Millard Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

Kathryn M. Sonneborn, AF 5019 Penn St., Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harold F. Sprague, Engineering, Wharton Club, 10020 194th St.. Hollis, N. Y. 

Marjorie Starbard, English, KKF 84 N. Oak St., Ridgewood, N. J. 

Ruth Caroline Stauffer, Mathematics, OM 1516 N. 2nd St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

David Walter Stickney, Social Science, K2 64 Park Ave., Bloomfield, N. J. 

Douglas Akyroyd Sunderland, Biology, KS 225 S. Easton Rd., Glenside, Pa. 

Robert Louis Testwuide, Economics, <I>K^ 502 Erie Ave., Sheboygan, Wis. 

Haradon William Troll, Economics, Wharton Club St. Clairsville, Ohio 

Donald Carre Turner, Engineering, $K^ 801 Harvard Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

William Robert Tyson, Engineering 814 Mahantango St.. Pottsville, Pa. 

Daulton Gillespie Viskniskki, Engineering, K2 _..82 Park St., Montclair, N. J. 

Rosamond English Walling, Social Science, nB$ Greenwich, Conn. 

Elizabeth Phillips Walls, English, $M 16 Princeton Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Joseph H. Walter, Economics, AY 508 Cedar Lane, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Janet Walton, HBO 412 Hodgson St., Oxford, Pa. 

Alice J. Wardell, Mathematics, XQ 204 Edgewood Ave., Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Mariana Webster Gwynedd, Pa. 

Merritt Samuel Webster, Mathematics '. Cheyney, Pa. 

Howard Carter Westwood, Political Science, $A0 Tecumseh, Neb. 

Frank H. Williams, Engineering, AY 719 Belmont Park, Dayton, Ohio 

Margaret Williams, French, XQ 404 Creswell St., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Houston Wilson, History R. F. D. 2, Milford, Del. 

Raymond Hiram Wilson, Mathematics 121 N. Market St., Duncannon, Pa. 

Robert Henry Wilson, English, <1)2K _ 5027 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Martha Mereon Wood, English, 11 B$ Edgemoor, Del. 

Martha Elizabeth Woodman, English State Hospital, Middleton, N. Y. 

Charles Brooke Worth, Engineering, OK^^ St. Davids Ave., St. Davids, Pa. 

E. Margaret Zabriskie, Social Science, AAT Hohokus, N. J. 



138 




f rw 1 




[140] 




President 
Benjamin Ludlow 

Vice-President 
Mary E. Fisher 

Secretary 
Nora Booth 

Treasurer 
Edmund Dawes 



Vice-President President Treasurer Secretary 



Freslmiaii Officers 



SECOND 
SEMESTER 

President 
H. Frank Brown 

Vice-President 
Jean Wahon 

Secretary 
Mary Tyler 

Treasurer 
Robert E. Hadeler 




Vice-President President Treasurer Secretary 



2^1 



[HI] 



Freshmee 



William Raoul Altstaetter, *K^^ 54 E. 54th St., Savannah, Ga. 

E. Sidney Baker, *A0 522 Brown Ave., Hagerstown, Md. 

Henry D. Baker, *2K R. F. D. 3, Trenton, N. J. 

Rhoda Thompson Bolin, XQ 70 Brookside Drive, Greenwich, Conn. 

Phillip E. Bomgardner. 't'SK Wernersville, Pa. 

Katherine Ravi Booth, KKF 1 Monument Ave., Bennington, Vt. 

Nora H. R. Booth, KKF 1 Monument Ave., Bennington, Vt. 

G. Douglas Boston Berlin, Md. 

Edith Bowman, 11 B* Barney Park, Irvington-on-the-Hudson, N. Y. 

Mabel Emma Brooks Pocono Manor Inn, Pocono Manor, Pa. 

Kenneth F. Broomell, *A0 6233 Winthrop Ave., Chicago, 111. 

H. Frank Brown, ^A© Las Cruces, New Mexico 

Marjorie Calvert, KKF 131 Woodward Ave., Rutherford, N. J. 

Anne Chapman, KKF 160 Hicks St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John Walker Clephane 6000 Connecticut Ave., Chevy Chase, Md. 

W. Wendell Clepper 388 Orchard St., Sharon, Pa. 

Ruth Cline, XQ 301 Cattell St., Easton, Pa. 

Mary Helen Clough Poultney, Vt. 

Helen Eckels Cocklin, #M _ 30 S. 14th St., Flushing, N. Y. 

Joseph E. Colson, K2 Woodstown, N. J. 

Mary D. Cockman, KA© 119 College Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

John Axtell Crowl, AY _ 802 Far Hills Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

Deirer May Dunn, AY. 8552 112th St., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

William R. Davenport 131 E. DuBois Ave., DuBois, Pa. 

Henrietta Thornton Davis, XQ 323 Otter St., Bristol, Pa. 

Edmund Dawes, $KY 5014 Penn St., Frankford, Pa. 

Anna Janney DeArmond 812 N. 63rd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dorothy F. Deininser, AF 3854 Girard Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ralph DeSola 1 381 Central Park West, New York, N. Y. 

Margaret B. Despard, XQ 1997 Clairmount Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Hyman Diamond, Wharton Club 4145 Caroline St., Long Island, N. Y. 

John Miller Dickey, *2K Oxford, Pa. 

James B. Doak _ 406 E. Washington St., Media, Pa. 

James B. Douglas, *KQ Swarthmore, Pa. 

Winston Mansfield Dudley 15th St., Oakmont, Pa. 

Ellen Ann Dunham, XQ Dogwood Road, Woodlawn, Md. 

William Wright Eaton, AY 1433 Stovall St., Augusta, Ga. 

Ralph Eniling 415 W. 10th St., Erie, Pa. 

John Wainwright Evans, 0211 St. Michaels, Md. 

Anna Dorcas Eyler 4310 Bucks Lane, W. Arlington, Baltimore, Md. 

Edward Fairbanks 3319 Newark St., Washington, D. C. 

Katherine D. Farquahr, KKF Kenneth Square, Pa. 

Mary Eleanor Fisher, KKF 1920 Mahantonaio St., Pottsville, Pa. 

Wilbert Frantz 219 N. Jackson St., Media, Pa. 

Orris King French 135 Hobart Ave., Summit, N. J. 

Helen Thompson Garrett 7933 Park Ave., Elkins Park, Pa. 

Helen Gates 723 8th St., Wilmette, 111. 

Howard Fred Gilespie 2228 N. 13th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

David Glunt, *2K 384 Park Ave., Rutherford, N. J. 

Helen Lilian Grumpelt, AAT LaRoche Ave., Harrington Park, N. J. 

Robert E. Hadeler, AY 900 Harmon Ave., Dayton, Oliio 

Ruth G. Hadley 93 Glenwood Ave., Leonia, N. J. 

Allen Lemuel Hardester 324 Main St., Crisfield, Md. 



[142 1 



Grace C. Haskell. ^^ East St., Rye, N. Y. 

Ralph Burdette Head, *K¥ South St., Greenfield, Ohio 

Ruth Helm Masonic Home, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

William Hendrickson, K2 208 Lippincott Ave., Riverton, N. J. 

Katherine E. Herschleb Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

Price Heusner, <^KW 612 High St., York, Neb. 

Morris Levick Hicks, $K^^ 33 Windeniere Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Florence A. Hoadley 518 Walnut Lane, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Roger K. Hoopes „ 511 W. Miner St., West Chester, Pa. 

James Dixon Hull. 0211 408 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, Md. 

Charles Howland Hunt 56 Davis Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 

Katherine Hunt, KKF 79 Grand view Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 

William Harrison Ingersoll 637 Ridgewood Rd., Maplewood, N. J. 

Louise Gertrude Isfort 119 Princeton Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Henrietta Arabel Jaquette, AF Elm Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Charles Albert Jeftries, AY 34 E. Second St., Media, Pa. 

Edward Janney Johns, KS Eighth and Olive Sts., Media, Pa. 

Howard W. Johnson 41 Amherst Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Carolyn W. Jones, AT 464 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 

James Russell Jones, $2K 123 S. West Ave., Vineland, N. J. 

Dorothy Keller, KA0 1621 Kincaid St., Highland Park, 111. 

Clark Kerr Jacksonwald, Pa. . 

Jonathan Kistler, 9211 _ 543 Arlington St., Tamaqua, Pa. 

Max Kohn, Wharton Club 1517 N. 16th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

William Kordsiemon, $A0 3429 Wisconsin Ave., Berwyn, 111. 

Frank Kunca, 1>2K 1587 Chestnut St., Trenton, N. J. 

Anna Louise Kurtz, LIB* _ 1023 Adams St., Wilminston, Del. 

Mabel E. Lawrence, *M 1418 Erie Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Richard Williamson Leach, <PA0 2650 Atlantic Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Davis L. Lewis, K2 Ogontz, Pa. 

Margaret Littlewood, KKF 445 Lyceum Ave., Roxboro, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Benjamin Ludlow, AY 225 Glenn Rd., Ardmore, Pa. 

Edward Scott Lutton, $A0 325 Grandview Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Charles B. McCord, *A0 7 Boulevard, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Louis C. March, K2 3010 Coopertown Rd., Newtown Square, Pa. 

Margaret Martin, 2300 Oakmont Ave., Oakmont, Del. Co., Pa. 

Winifred J. Marvin, KA0 515 Yale Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

Virginia T. Melchior, XQ 108 E. Greenwood Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Virginia G. Merritt, KA0 1 Grove Place, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Priscilla G. Miller, KA0 R. F. D. 2, Phoenixville, Pa. 

Osmond Molarsky 62 High St., Nutley, N. J. 

Robert D. Moore, #2K 417 Linden Ave., Riverton, N. J. 

Eleanor Morris, LIB*]) Pendleton, Indiana 

Genevieve Morris 411 E. Church St., Oxford, Ohio 

Lucretia A. Mott, AF 306 West Utica St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Elizabeth E. Moxley, <I>M 41 W. Phil-Ellena St., Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Irene S. Nichols 8747 116th St., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

Dorothy Ogle Catonsville, Maryland 

Mary Louise Palmenberg, KKF Spring Valley, Rockland Co., N. Y. 

Clara W. Palmer, <PM 800 Lore Ave., Wilmington, Del. 

Thomas C. Park, AY Swarthmore, Pa. 

Richard E. Passmore Chadd's Ford, Pa. 

Evelyn T. Patterson, KKF 14 Derwen Road, Cynwood, Pa. 

Thomas T. Patterson 1410 Wharton St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Eda Brill Patton, <I>M 918 Church Lane, Yeadon, Pa. 

William H. Perloff, Wharton Club 6236 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



[ 143 



E. Marian Pierce, 116$ New Castle, Del. 

John B. Pollock, 02 n 4207 State Road, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Ray Leslie Potter, <1)A0 198 Main St., Hamburg, N. Y. 

Elsie K. Powell, KA0 130 E. 70th St., New York, N. Y. 

Edna N. Pusey. 228 E. Biddle St., West Chester, Pa. 

Eleanor Y. Pusey 228 E. Biddle St., West Chester, Pa. 

Stephen J. Pyle, <I>K^F 15 Windemere Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Kathleen C. Quinn, KA0 401 Pembroke Rd., Cynwood, Pa. 

Catherine B. Rambo, nB$ 1210 Evergreen Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

Alfred Raucli, <1>2:K 1001 Columbia Ave., MillviUe, N. J. 

Priscilla Rawson, KA0 Hamilton, N. Y. 

Frances Reinhold, IIB<^ 273 S. Cecil St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Edwin J. Reynolds, KA0 234 E. Third St., Media, Pa. 

Jean Reynolds, KA0 3738 Jenifer St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Susan Roth, $M 117 E. 4th Ave., Conshohocken, Pa. 

Henry Rudy, ^KW Paducah, Kv. 

Mary Relief Rumely, KA© 435 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 

Doris H. Runge, OM 1315 Delaware Ave., Wilmington, Del. 

Helena V. Salmon, AR Dysard Hill, Ashland, Ky. 

Sarah Sargent, <1>M 404 W. 116th St., New York, N. Y. 

Helen U. Seaman, XQ 11 Grant Ave., Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Henry Bogart Seaman _ Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Adeline M. Shortlidge, KKF 224 W. Evergreen St., West Grove, Pa. 

Dorothy E. Slee, XQ Whitemarsh, Pa. 

Edith Smiley, KA0 6705 N. 12th St., Oak Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harvey Smith 1009 Kerlin St., Chester, Pa. 

Helen M. Smith, AAT 26 Oak St., Salem, N. J. 

Wales Eugene Smith, $A0 660 E. Morgan St., Martinsville, HI. 

Walter F. Snyder 224 Woodlawn Ave., Merchantville, N. J. 

Robert Sonneman, <&A0 814 S. George St., York, Pa. 

Elizabeth S. Stirling, KA0 1301 W. 13th St., Wilmington, Del. 

Harry Spogell 411 N. Broad St., Lansdale, Pa. 

J. Thomas StarHng, $A0 1716 S. Main St., Hopkinsville, Ky. 

\^"illiam Irving Stieglitz, Wharton Club, 529 S. Linden Ave., Highland Park. 111. 

Sara Stidham, KA0 3322 Newark St., Washington, D. C. 

Elizabeth S. Stirling, KA0 1301 W. 13th St., Wilmington, Del. 

William Taylor....._ 133 E. Third St., Media, Pa. 

Eunice G. Terry 937 Greenwood Ave., Trenton, N. J. 

Katherine E. Thompson, KKF 5016 Schuyler St., Germantown, Pa. 

Alfonso Tomassetti, K2 328 Benson St., Camden, N. J. 

Helen Townsend 526 Clark St., Westfield, N. J. 

Marjorie Trent 105 E. Essex Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Richard Turner, $KM^ 731 Yale Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Mary W. Tyler, HBO 2 Park St., Riverton, N. J. 

W. Monroe Vansant, 0211 3415 Ridge Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Samuel H. Walker. Hatboro, Pa. 

Jean Walton, IIB^ Riverview Road, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Lewis Edwin Walton, K2 24 E. Central Ave., Moorestown, N. J. 

Louis Stockton Walton, $A0 2416 Second Ave., Altoona, Pa. 

Helen Louise West, XQ 473 Griggs PI., East Aurora, N. Y. 

Mary Helen Willis North Wales, Pa. 

Thomas Andrew Wilson, OA0 2500 Van Buren St., Wilmington, Del. 

Louise F. Windle, KA0 Dellwyn, West Chester, Pa. 

Jane M. Wood-Smith, OM 5052 Forbes St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Anna Worth, KA0 Claymont, Del. 

Priscilla Yard, XQ Wallace Lodge, Yonkers, N. Y. 



^ 



[144] 




tliOS; ,.< to * 



All 



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ii»:> K 



\v. 



• I 141 




[145] 




Brown Hoadley Strong Wagner Poole Eisenstaedt 
Burr Hamilton Hallowell Drake Worth Spangler Cohen 



u 



KAPPA SIGMA 
James B. Burr, '29 Howard F. Brown, '30 

PHI KAPPA PSI 
John S. Worth, '30 Harold E. Wagner, '30 

DELTA UPSILON 

H. Thomas Hallowell, '29 Howard C. Johnson, '30 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA 
H. Mortimer Drake, '29 Paul T. Strong. '30 

PHI DELTA THETA 
Donovan B. Spangler, '29 William Poole, '30 

THETA SIGMA PI 
Donald M. Hamilton, '29 George B. Hoadley, '30 

WHARTON CLUB 
Myer Cohen, Jr., '29 Edgar I. Eisenstaedt, '30 




Wolf Fahringer Gurney Richards Cleaver 
Burch Shoemaker Walton Larzelere Thompson Harris Robison 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 
Marion C. Harris, '29 Ruth Jackson, '30 

PI BETA PHI 

Betty Louise Thompson, '29 Anna Rickards, '30 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 
Margaret B. Walton, '29 Jean Fahringer, '30 

DELTA GAMMA 
Dorothy Shoemaker, '29 Ruth Cleaver, '30 

CHI OMEGA 
H. Caroline Robison, '29 Elizabeth Yard, '30 

PHIMU 
Helen Larzelere, '29 Dorothy Wolf, '30 

ALPHA DELTA TAU 
Eleanor Burch, '29 Margaret Gurney, '30 



^^ 



zs 



Kappa Sigma 

PI CHAPTER 



Founded 1869 



Established 1888 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 

Albert Engles Blackburn, Jr. 
Neville Craig Gee 
Malcolm Hodsfe 



Frank Harrison Martin, Jr. 
John Francis McBride 
\^'ilbur Morris McFeely 



Walter Raymond Seibert 



Juniors 



Howard Francis Bro^vn 
Charles Bertram Hammell 
Harry Heward, Jr. 
John Russell LeCron 



Philip James Leigh 
Frederick Shreiber 
Paul James Smith 
Jackson Taylor 



Orville Reisler Wright 



Sophomores 



Lincoln Atkiss 
Richard Clarkson Bond 
Carl Kugler Dellniuth 
Neville Craig Gee 
Joseph Harlan 



Daniel Hubbell 
Charles Edmund Pugh 
Da\T[d Walter Stickney 
Douglas Aykroyd Sunderhind 
Daulton Gillespie Viskniskki 



Joseph E. Colson 
William Hendrickson 
Edward Janney Johns 



Freshmen 



Davis Levis Lewis, Jr. 
Louis C. March 
Alfonso Tomassetti 



Lewis Edwin Walton 



[148] 




PENNSYLVANIA KAPPA CHAPTER 



Founded 1852 



Established 1889 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Curtis Lyon Barnes 
Thomas McPherson Brown 
Joseph Dukes Calhoun 
John Sharpless Worth 



Juniors 



Robert Forsythe Bishop 
Julien Davies Cornell 
Barton Purdy Ferris 
Edward Needles Lippincott 



Robert Gates Dawes 
Francis Fisher White 
Josiah White, Jr. 
Howard John Wood 



Henry Lippincott Parrish 
Edward Martindale Passmore 
Howard Haines Turner 
Harold Edmund Wagner 



Thomas Shryock Nicely 



Sophomores 



Clement Miller Biddle, Jr. 
Irwin Gwinn Burton 
Robert Hulbert Douglas 
William Eugene Kirsch 
Joshua Gordon Lippincott 



Daniel Sinclair, 3rd 
John Perry Skinner 
Robert Lewis Testwuide 
Donald Carre Turner 
Charles Brooke Worth 



William Stanley McCune 



Freshmen 



William Raoul Altstaetter 
Edmund Dawes 
James Bacon Douglas 
Ralph Burdette Head 



Albert Price Heusner 
Morris Levick Hicks 
Stephen John Pyle 
Henry Rudy 



Ricliard Townsend Turner 



1 


^^Ml 


i 

t 

\ 

I 
i 


1 


fcJ ■ ~~^"" ' 1/ .i;:. 


J1 


flu ^HllJii 


> 





Hicks Alstaetter Douglas Pyle R. Turner D. Turner E. Dawes 

Kirseh Testwuide Parrish McCune Burton G. Lippinoott Sinclair Skinner 

Ferris Passmore B. Worth H. Turner Biddle Bishop Rudy E. Lippincott Wagner 

Calhoun J.White J.Worth Wood R.Dawes Brown F.White Cornell 




151 




SWARTHMORE CHAPTER 
Founded 1834 Established 1893 

ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 

Christian Bert Adelman 
Howard Thomas Hallowell, Jr. 
Horace McGuire 
Charles Thorne Ricker 



Thomas Philip Sharpies 
Shaler Stidham 
Henry Bowman Seaman, Jr. 
William Baldwin Wickersham 



Juniors 

Francis Carter Alden 
Robert Lippincott Booth 
Henry Braid Coles, Jr. 
Howard Cooper Johnson, Jr. 



Malcolm Rettew Longshore 
Norman Hugh McDiarmid 

Lawrence Myers Russell 
John Hinchman Stokes 



Joseph Thomas Sullivan, 2nd 



Sophomores 

Joseph Laurence Atkinson 

Frank Sharp Christian 

John Montgomery Cookenbach 

Paul Crowl 

William Price Dowdy 



Albert L. Hood, Jr. 
Thomas Smyth Keefer, Jr. 
Albert James Pittman 
C. William Potts 
Joseph Horace Walter, Jr. 



Frank H. Williams 



John Axtell Crowl 
Robert E. Hadeler 
William Wright Eaton 



Freshmen 



Charles Albert Jeffries, Jr. 
Benjamin Ludlow 
Thomas C. Park, Jr. 



=u 




Booth Ludlow Park J. Crowl Eaton Hadeler 

Keefer Christian Pittnian Cookenbach Atkinson Dowdy Hood Potts 

McDiarmid Coles Longshore Williams Johnson P. Crowl Sullivan Stokes Russell Walter 

Sharpies McGuire Stidham Hallowell Rioker Adelman Wickersham 




1 



153 




igmai 

PHI CHAPTER 



Founded 1873 



Established 1906 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Milton Job Atkinson 
Oliver Hammond Coles 
Howard Mortimer Drake 



Paul Marshall James 
Louis Laubacli Kumpf 
Morris Matthews Lee, Jr. 



Walter Allen Muir 



Juniors 



Howard Eavenson Boyer 
Louis Sloan Bringhurst 
Donald Everett Buckwell 
Garrett Edward Conklin 
Robert Lisle Gould 



Benjamin Carpenter Haviland 

Ray Perkins Hunt 

Alexander James IMcCloskey, Jr. 

Thomas Richard Moore 

Paul Theodore Strong 



Ralph Wickersham Yoder 



Sophomores 



Clifford Carl Baker 
John Morgan Brecht 
John Thomas Cohen, Jr. 
John Darlington Corbit, Jr. 
Allen Dyer Howland 



William Alderman Jaquette 
Lawrence Edward Jewett 
Robert Hawthorne Lamey 
Harold Fuller Sprague 
Robert Henry Wilson 



Freshmen 



Henry Davis Baker 
David Glunt 
James Russell Jones 



Frank Frederick Kunca 
Robert Donald Moore 
Alfred Raucli 



[ 154 




Kunca Jones Bomgardner D. Baker Gluiit 

Jaquette Corbit Wilson Jewett B. Moore 

Bringhurst Rowland Brecht C. Baker Laraey Cohen 

Rauch Buckwell Muir McCloskey Lee Yoder Haviland Hunt 

Coles Kumpf Atkinson Drake James Moore Boyer Strong 



ftilih 


■'m 


r -. 


WM 


4 




mf^ 1 






tV9BIkJ^^9H 




B^^^ 




m ^ 






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[155 




FM Delta Theta 

PENNSYLVANIA KAPPA CHAPTER 



Founded 1848 



Established 1918 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Horace Fenelon Darlington 
William Wesley Delaney 
George Hay Kain, Jr. 
Will McLain, Srd 



Fred Jackson Powell 
Ralph Striker Selover 
Victor Russell Selover 
Harold Edward Snyder 



Donovan B. Spangler 



Juniors 



William Anton Boone 
Harold Frederick Carter 
Eldredge Milton Hiller 
Richard Morgan Kain 



Edward Morgan Lapham, Jr. 
William Poole 
Robert Brittain Redman 
Harold Brown Thomson 



Stanley Irving Winde 



Sophomores 

Arthur Frank Baldwin 
William Blum, Jr. 
Ralph Libby Connor 
William Thomas Jones 
Robert Edmonds Kintner 



Thomas Willets Lapham 
Samuel Mahon 
Edward Lee Noyes 
Leon A. Rushmore, Jr. 
Edward Reynolds Seyburn 



Howard Carter Westwood 



Freshmen 



E. Sydney Baker 
H. Frank Brown 
Kenneth F. Broomell 
William M. Kordsiemon 
Richard Williamson Leach 
Kdwin S. Lutton 



C. Bertram McCord 
Ray Leslie Potter 
Robert C. Sonneman 
Wales Eugene Smith 
J. Thomas Starling 
Louis Stockton Walton, Jr. 



Thomas Andrew Wilson 




McCord 



Potter Broomell Walton Lutton Starling Baker Bro^vn Wilson Leach 
Blum Kordsienion Baldwin Sonneman Smith Noyes 
T. Lapliam Redman Westwood Thompson Jones Poole Rushmore Connor 
E. Lapham Mahon McLain Boone Winde 
Delaney G. Kaiu Powell Darlington Snyder Spangler R. Kain Selover 




[ 157 




Bradley C. Algeo 

Philip Elie Coleman, 3rd 

James Downey Egleson 



Donald Myers Hamilton 
William M. Rice 
Harold El am Snyder 



Frederick George Weigand 



Juniors 



Marvin Roberts Coles 
Franklin Carnell Eden 
William Winslow Gardner 



George Burnliam Hoadley 
Kenneth Alexander Meikeljolin 
Morton Auljrey Milne 



SophomoT f s 



Richard Oliver Bender 
James Henry Booser 
William Henry Cleveland, Jr. 
William James Cresson 



Lewis Fussell, Jr. 
Knox Kehew 
Rogers McVaugh 
David Lukens Price 



Freshmcii 

John Wainwright Evans, Jr. Jonathan Kistler 

James Dixon Hull John B. Pollack 

W. Monroe Vaiisaiit, Jr. 




Vansant Pollock Kistler Hull Evans Price 
Hoadley Cresson Milne Fussell Kehew Cleveland McVaugh Bender 
Rice Algeo Coleman Egleson Snyder Hamilton Weigand 




159] 




Founded 1870 



Kappa Alplia Theta 

Alpha Beta Chapter Established 1891 



Elizabeth Clack 
Marion Comly Harris 
Agnes Lawson Hood 
Julia Kehew 



Seniors 



Elizabeth Caselberry Kersey 
Sylvia Chalfonte Windle 
Margaret Worth 
Mary Roberts 



Anna Lippincott Bid die 
Emma Catherine Hatfield 
Ruth Wilson Jackson 



Juniors 



Eleanor Foulke Jenkins 
Sarah Hopper Powell 
Katherine Smedley 



Louise Kinsey Yerkes 



Sophomores 



Beatrice FuUerton Beach 
Helen Lippincott Booth 
Ruth Caldwell 
Adelaide Lancaster Emley 
Natalie Harper 
Elma A. Hurlock 



Caroline A. Jackson 
Eleanor Foulke Martindale 
Mary Dixon Palmer 
Ruth Anna Passmore 
Barbara Pearson 
Martha Roberts 



Freshmen 



Mary D. Cookman 
Dorothy Keller 
Winifred J. Marvin 
Virginia G. Merritt 
Priscilla G. Miller 
Elsie K. Powell, Jr. 
Kathleen C. Quinn 
Priscilla Alden Rawson 



Jean Reynolds 
Mary Relief Rumely 
Edith Smiley 
Elizabeth J. Spaulding 
Sara Stidham 
Elizabeth S. Stirling 
Louise F. Windle 
Anne Worth 




Reynolds Miller Smiley A.Worth E.Powell 

Palmer Harper Emley Keller Rawson 

M.Roberts C.Jackson Hurlock Yerkes Jenkins S.Powell Quinn Stirling 

M. H. Roberts Kehew M. Worth Clack Hood Windle Harris Hatfield Booth 




161 




1 

PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA CHAPTER 
Founded 1867 Established 1892 

ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Olive Osgood Filer 
Elizabeth Ingram Hoopes 
Mary Martin Magruder 
Elizabeth Morton Ogden 



Mary Walton 



Gertrude Kervey Paxson 
Eleanor Frost Powell 
Elizabeth I,ouise Thompson 
Lily Tily 



Juniors 



Rebecca Castle 

Ada Palmer Fuller 

Merida Grey 

Anna Margaret Rickards 



Eva Scarlett 
Marion Staley 
Josephine Steckel 
Mary Temple 



Ruth J. Davis 
Amelia A. Emhardt 
Louise I. Fisher 
Jean E. Harvey 



Sophomores 



Florence N. Hearne 
Marjorie Murdock 
Rosamond E. Walling 
Janet Walton 



Martha M. Wood 



Freshmen 



Edith Bowman 
Anna Louise Kurtz 
Eleanor Morris 
E. Marian Pierce 



Catherine B. Rambo 
Frances Reinbold 
Mary W. Tyler 
Jean Walton 




1162] 




Fisher 



Bowman Morris Kurlz Pierce ReinholJ Walton Tyler 
Harvey Steokel Grey Wood Rickards 

Scarlett Castle Staley Paxon Thompson Ogden Powell Hoopes 



C. Emhardt 




BETA IOTA CHAPTER 



Founded 1870 



Established 1893 



Seniors 



Rebecca Kirk Blackburn 
Julia Merrill Blaine 
Roberta Boak 
Marion Hannab Collins 



Anne Carolyn Forstner 
Anne Sweeney Lefever 
Cora Elizabeth Palmenberg 
Alice Stout 



Margaret Brosius Walton 



Juniors 



Dorothy Agnes Ackart 
Jean T. Fahringer 
Sarah Fisher 
Marion W. Geare 



Helen Rebecca Hadley 
Marian Hamming 
Mary Ann Ogden 
Margaret D. Read 



Mildred Underwood 



Priscilla Alden Bacon 
Helen C. Brooke 
Mariana Chapman 
Kathryn E. Kerlin 



Sophomores 



Helen M. Hoskinson 
Jane W, Michener 
Margaret K. Mix 
Margaret Caroline Orr 



Marjorie Starbard 



Freshmen 



Katherine R. Booth 
Nora R. Booth 
Marjorie Calvert 
Anne Chapman 
Katharine Dare Farquhar 
Mary Eleanor Fisher 



Katherine Hunt 
Margaret Littlewood 
Mary Louise Palmenberg 
Evelyn T. Patterson 
Adeline M. Shortlidge 
Katherine E. Thompson 



[164] 




Chapman K. Booth Hunt Miohener Fisher N. Booth 

M. Palmenberg Calvert Bacon Mix Patterson Shortlidge 

Orr Ackart Ogden Fahringer Underwood Farquhar Hoskinson Starbord 

E. Palmenberg Stout Collins Boak Walton Forstner Hamming Blackburn 




[ 165 




ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 



Founded 1873 



Mary Anderson 
Marion Bonner 
Elinor Brecht 



Seniors 

Mary Elizabeth George 
Jane Perry Greist 
Dorothy Shoemaker 
Wanda May Veasey 



Juniors 



Sarah Brecht 

Ruth Blackburn Cleaver 



Helen Margaret Headley 
Virginia Barnes Stratton 



Sophomores 

Helen Margaret Andrews 
Margaret Hickman Brinton 
Helen R. Fletcher 
Helen Dorothy Lafore 
Mildred Elizabeth Maxfield 



Miriam Nickle 

Edith Elizabeth Reeves 

Esther Seaman 

Clara Lucretia Sigman 

Kathryn M. Sonneborn 



Freshmen 



Deidre May Dann 
Dorothy F. Deininger 
Grace C. Haskell 
Henrietta Arabel Jaquette 



Carolyn W. Jones 
Lucretia A. Mott 
Helena V. Salmon 
Eunice G. Terry 







Lafore Fletcher Terry Deininger Jones Jaquette Maxfield Dann 

Andrews Nickel Brinton Sonneborn Seaman Salmon Mott Reeves 

Stratton Cleaver Brecht George Veasey Bonner Headley 




[167] 




CM Omega 

GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER 



Founded 1895 



Established 1919 



Linda Alice Chandler 
Marion Millicent Hall 



Sej 



Bertha Brooniell Hull 
Helen Caroline Robison 



Juniors 

Anna Elizabeth Bennett 

Helen Pauline Calhoun 

Nancy Deane 

Dorothy Elizabeth Carolyn Ditter 

Frances Elizabeth Eaton 



Eleanor Flexner 
Catherine Marjiuerite Foster 
Marian Smedley Reynolds 
Josephine Maria Tremaine 
Elizabeth Hickcox Yard 



Sophomores 



Barbara Briggs 
Margaret Lucretia Dewees 
Janet Elizabeth Evans 
Ellen Watson Fernon 



Elizabeth Newcomb 
Alice Josephine Wardell 
Margaret Williams 
Margaret Paxson 



Freshmen 



Rhoda Thompson Bohn 
Ruth Cline 

Henrietta Thornton Davis 
Margaret B. Despard 
Ellen Ann Dunham 



Virginia T. Melcbior 
Dorothy E. Slee 
Helen Louise West 
Priscilla Yard 
Helen U. Seaman 



168 




West Uespard Williams Newcomb Dunham 

Seaman Melchior Wardell Foster Briggs Bohn Bennett 

Davis Flexner Revnolds Hull Chandler Calhoun Tremain Cline Slee 




^m 



[169] 




BETA EPSILON CHAPTER 



Founded 1852 



Seniors 

Mary Katherine Anders Helen Vilona Larzelere 

Martha Jeannette Stauffer 



Juniors 



Theodora Gladys Abbott 
Betty Loynd Bamberger 
Elizabeth Keiser Harbold 
Lois Day Larzelere 



Margaret ]\IcCurley Maltbie 
Margaret Elizabeth Spencer 
Selina Elizabeth Turner 
Dorothy Frances Wolf 



Sophomores 



Katherine H. Bennett 
Florence Louise Marsh 



Elizabeth Philips \^ alls 
Ruth Caroline Stauffer 



Helen Cocklin 
Mabel E. La\\T:ence 
Elizabeth E. Moxey 
Clara W. Palmer 



Freshmen 



Eda Brill Patton 
Susan Roth 
Doris H. Runge 
Sarah Sargent 



Jane M. Wood-Smith 



[170! 




Moxey Runge Patton Wood-Smith Roth 

Lawrence Sargent Marsh Pahner R. Stauffer Bennett 

Wolf Walls Turner Spencer Bamberger Harbold L. Larzelere 

Abbott Anders H. Larzelere M. Stauffer Maltbie 




[171] 




Belts Smith Colson McKenzie Grumpelt Zabriskie 
Dudley Von Aniinon Williams Gurney Eaton Burch Patterson 



Alpha Delta Tan 

Founded 1928 Local Fraternity 

Seniors 
Eleanor S. Burch Winona W; V^on Ammon 

Louise V. Eaton M. Alice Williams 

Juniors 
Marion L. Colson Mary E. McKenzie Margaret Gurney 

SophoTuores 
Mary E. Betts 
Esther E. Dudley 

Freshmen 
Helen L. Grumpelt Helen Smith 



Katharine D. Patterson 
E. Margaret Zabriskie 




^^ 



[172 




Stafford Hull Eyler Hutchinson Bessimer Bicknell Willis 
Pusey Ogle Hettinger Webster Reynolds Morris 



The Elizabeth Powell Bond Cliih 

The Elizabeth Powell Bond Club was organized in the fall of 1928 as a social 
organization for non-fraternity women at Swarthniore. The aim of the club is to 
establish an organized group which will provide social activity for the members. 
The club is open to all non-fraternity women who desire membership, and 
welcomes all non-fraternity alumnae. 

OFFICERS 

President Eloise Hettinger, '30 

Secretary-Treasurer Marianna Webster, '31 



MEMBERS 



Helen Bessemer, '30 
Mercy Bicknell, '29 
Elizabeth Chambers, '32 
Betty DeLong, '31 
Anna Dorcas Eyler, '32 
Ruth Helm, '32 
Alma Hull, '31 
Anna Hull, '29 
Alice Hutchinson, '29 



Eleanor Janney, '30 
Margaret Martin, '32 
Genevieve Morris, '32 
Dorothy Ogle, '32 
Edna Pusey, '32 
Eleanor Pusey, '32 
Elizabeth Reynolds, '29 
Helen Stafford, '30 
Helen Willis, '32 



173] 




Ingersoll Gillespie Hardester French Kohn Dudley Sprogell 

DeSola Jillson Diamond Emling DePuy Perloff NewT)her Stieglitz 

Haskell Coleman Blackburn Cohen Lednum Felter Troll 



\^ EARERS OF THE PIN AND TORCH 



Philip C. Blackburn. '29 
Myer Cohen, Jr.. '29 
Walter B. Coleman. '29 
Edward DePuy, '30 
Hyman Diamond, '32 
Edgar I. Eisenstaedt, '30 
Haines B. Felter, '30 
Da^dd C. Haskell, '30 
Da\dd C. Jillson, '31 
H. Dietz Keller, Jr., '30 



Max Kohn, '32 
WiUiam E. Lednum, '29 
Donald K. McGarrah, '31 
Edwin L. Newpher. '31 
William Perloff. '32 
Daniel F. Smith, '29 
Harold F. Sprague, '31 
William I. Stieglitz. '32 
Henry G. Swain. '30 
Haradon W. Troll, '31 




^m 



[174] 




ITf) I 




a 



President Robert C. Brooks, Faculty 

Vice-President Richard W. Slocum, '22 

Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth N. Frorer, '19 



Executive Committee 



Brand Blanshard, Faculty 
Mary Laing Wolverton Green, 92 
Dorothy Merrill, '26 



Abby Mary Hall Roberts, '90 
Will Carson Ryan, Faculty 
Reba Camp Hodge 



Fratres in Facultate 



Frank Aydelotte (Indiana Univ.) 
Lydia Baer (Oberlin College) 
Charles R. Bagley (Duke University) 
Brand Blanshard (Univ. of Mich.) 
Frances B. Blanshard (Smith Col.) 
Ethel H. Brewster (Swarthmore) 
Robert Clarkson Brooks (Ind. Univ.) 
Milan W. Garrett (Stanford Univ. 1 
Harold Clarke Goddard (Amherst) 
John Russell Hayes (Swarthmore) 
Jesse Herman Holmes (Nebraska) 



William Isaac Hull (Swarthmore) 
Frederick J. Manning (Yale Univ.) 
Henrietta J. Meeteer (Indiana! 
John Anthony Miller (Indiana) 
Richard P. Miller (Swarthmore) 
Clara Price Newport (Swarthmore) 
Margaret Pitkin ( Swarthmore ) 
Will Carson Ryan (Harvard Univ.) 
Raymond Walters (Lehigh Univ.) 
Richard M. Slocum (Swarthmore) 
Alan C. Valentine (Swarthmore) 



Honorary Member 
Franklin Spencer Edmonds 



Class of 1928 



Ellis G. Bishop 
Louis K. Clothier 
Eilene M. Galloway 
Phyllis F. Harper 
Holbrook M. MacNeille 
Grace E. McHenry 
Douglass W. Orr 
Marian B. Pratt 



Charlotte S. Salmon 
Gertrude B. Sanders 
Edward Sellers 
Robert Silber 
Albert Smith 
Margaret Somerville 
Marietta Watson 
Mary Wright 



1 17'> 1 




lema 



XI 



Founded at Cornell University in 1886 

Sigma Xi endeavors to encourage scientific research and original investiga- 
tion. During the years of preparation the society offers inspiration to its asso- 
ciate members, and when exceptional ability is displayed in independent think- 
ing a student may be taken into full membership. 



Gellert Alleman 
Detlev Bronk 
Edward H. Cox 
H. Jermain Creighton 
Howard S. Curtis 
Arnold Dresden 
Weston E. Fuller 

Spencer Trotter 



Fratres in F and tat e 
Lewis Fussell 
Milan W. Garrett 
George A. Hoadley 
Howard M. Jenkins 
Michel Kovalenko 
Ross W. Marriott 
E. LeRoy Mercer 



Undergraduate Associate 



Thomas Brown, '29 
James Egelson, '29 



John A. Miller 
Samuel C. Palmer 
Alice Rogers 
Arthur J. Rawson 
Walter S. Scott 
Andrew Simpson 
Charles G. Thatcher 
Winthrop R. Wright 

Members 

Donovan Spangler, '29 

Winona Von Amnion. '29 




)igma 

Founded at the University of Nebraska, February 24, 1904. 

Majors in Engineering who have displayed marked ability in scholarship 
are eligible after their Sophomore year. 

Faculty Members 
Lewis Fussell, '02 Weston E. Fuller 

Charles G. Thatcher, '12 Errol W. Doebler 

Andrew Simpson, '19 Harold M. Jenkins 

Undergraduate Members 
William S. LaLonde (Honorary) James D. Egleson, '29 

Bradley Algeo, '29 Donovan B. Spangler, '29 

William Delaney, '29 George Hoadley, '30 

Stanley Winde, '30 



177 




Delta Sigma Rho 

DELTA SIGMA RHO is a national honorary forensic society, not secret 
or social, for the purpose of fostering the highest types of sincere and 
effective speaking. It is honorary only in the sense tliat it seeks to rec- 
ognize honor already earned by members who represent chapters and other col- 
lege groups at large. Membership is awarded to students who have engaged in 
debating or oratory in some intercollegiate contest. Juniors and Seniors are 
eligible. 



President . . . . 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Marion Hall, '29 
Frances Eaton, '30 
Barton Ferris, '30 



Officers 

Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 

Mrs. Caroline Hadley Robinson, '06 
Richard M. Kain, '30 
William Poole, '30 
Mary Temple, '30 




a 



The purpose of this honorary fraternity is to increase interest in the 
Musical Clubs and to attract the best material in College to try out each year; 
to improve the quality of the clubs; to create a feeUng of fellowship growing 
out of the contact of the members ; and to provide a reward for work on behalf 
of the clubs. 



Thomas M. Brown, '29 
Garret Conklin, '30 
Parker P. King, '29 
Morton A. Milne, '30 
Thomas Nicely, '30 
Edward Passmore, '30 



C. Thorne Ricker, '29 
Thomas P. Sharpless, '29 
Harold Edward Snyder. '29 
Harold Elam Snyder, '29 
Howard J. Wood, '29 
William B. Wickersham, '29 



[178] 




Pi Delta Epsilon' 

Founded at Syracuse Vn-versity in 1909 

Pi Delta Epsilon is a men's national journalistic society to which Juniors who 
have rendered distinguished service on college publications over a period of two 
years are eligible. Elections to this honorary society at Swarthmore usually take 
place in the month of April. In editing the weekly college newspaper, the 
Phoenix, and in publishing the Halcyon yearly, Swarthmore students are afforded 
opportunities of displaying valuable service in literary and business manage- 
ment fields. 



FACULTY MEMBER 
Raymond Walters 

1929 OFFICERS 

President Milton J. Atkinson, '29 

Vice-President Malcom Hodge, '29 

Secretary 0. Hammond Coles, '29 

Treasurer. John F. McBride, '29 



David J. Anderson, '29 
Albert E. Blackburn, '29 
Philip E. Coleman, '29 



Louis L. Kumpf, '29 
Frank H. Martin, '29 
Harold Elam Snyder, '29 



[179: 






Founded at the University of Wisconsin 

This fraternity aims to raise the standard of journalism in the college, to 
bring journalists of note to Swarthmore and to encourage and help candidates 
with their work. Women who have shown marked ability on the editorial 
or business sides of the student publications are eligible for membership at 
the end of the Sophomore year. This chapter of Coranto is an outgrowth 
of Delta Iota Delta, local journalistic society, founded in 1926. 

BETA CHAPTER 

Installed February 5, 1928 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Frances S. Blanshard 

UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 



Dorothy A. Ackart, '30 
Mary Anderson, '29 
Eleanor S. Burch, '29 
Linda A. Chandler, '29 
Sarah Fisher, '30 
Eleanor Flexner, '30 
Carolyn Fostner, '29 
Marion M. Hall, '29 
Elizabeth Harbold, '30 



Marian C. Harris, '29 
Bertha B. Hull, '29 
Helen V. Larzelere, '29 
Lois D. Larzelere, '30 
Elizabeth M. Ogden, '29 
Elizabeth Palmenberg, '29 
Selina Turner, '30 
Margaret Worth, '29 
Elizabeth Yard, '30 



Louise Yerkes, '30 



fAl 



•Lf 



Founded February 20, 1918 

The Honorary Society for Senior women whose purpose is the furthering 
of students' responsibiUty towards the best interests of the college. The mem- 
bers are chosen for distinction in leadership, scholarship and service to Swarth- 
more. 

Mary Anderson 
Elinor Brecht 
Linda A. Chandler 
Caroline Robison 
Lily Tily 

Winona Von Amnion 
Margaret Worth 



[181 




William A. Boone 
Bertram Hammell 
John R. Le Cron 
Edward N. Lippincott 
Alexander J. McCloskey, Jr. 
Lawrence M. Russell 
John H. Stokes 
Paul T. Strong 
Stanley I. Winde 




Women who have shown exceptional interest and ability in trying out for 
the managerships of the various intercollegiate sports are eligible for mem- 
bership. Members are active only in their Junior year. 



Elizabeth Lanning — Honorary Member 
Theodora Gladys Abbott Merida Grey 

Anna Lippincott Biddle Marian Hamming 

Rebecca Schock Castle Mary Ann Ogden 

Ruth Cleaver Marian Staley 

Nancy Deane Mildred L. Underwood 

Helen Rebecca Hadley 



183] 




I'oing 



jlcttbtttes( 



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185 ] 




Heward Hammell Strong Winde 
Drake Bro\vTi McFeeley Wood 



Executive Committee 

First Semester 

President Thomas M. Brown, '29 

Secretary Stanley I. Winde, '30 

Howard J. Wood, '29 Wilbur M. McFeely, '29 

Paul T. Strong, '30 

Second Semester 

President Wilbur M. McFeely, '29 

Secretary C. Bertram Hammell, '30 

Mortimer Drake, '29 Thomas M. Brown, '29 

Harry Heward, Jr., "30 



186 1 




Women's Stedemt Government 



Executive Board 

President Caroline Robison, '29 

Vice-President Pauline Calhoun, '30 

Secretary - • Barbara Pearson, '31 

Treasurer Elizabeth Ogden. '29 

Dorothy Shoemaker, '29 Nancy Deane, '30 

Agnes Hood. '29 Jean Fahringer, '30 

Elizabeth Stirling, '32 



187 



Butiltcattonsi 



The Swarthmore Phoenix 




C 



Editor 



ONFIDENT of the fact that progress does not con- 
sist of sweeping changes and unusual innovations, 
but rather rests in adopting and improving the 
products of former years, the 1928-1929 Phoenix staff 
has made little change in the make-up of the newspaper. 
The organization of the staff and the publication of the 
paper has been made more efficient, and the finished paper 
has shown a higher degree of accuracy, enterprise and 
progressive outlook than the editions of former years. 

Journalistically speaking, however, the paper has seen 
little change in the past year. The staff has simply aimed 
to fulfill the task which was given them: to edit, finance, and distribute a good 
weekly paper, which will report the news of college in approved style for 
alumni, faculty and undergraduates; to take a progressive and definite stand on 
significant questions of college life; to conduct a public opinion colmnn which 
will serve as an open forum for expressions of individual viewpoints upon college 
matters. If the present staff has fulfilled this purpose successfully it will feel 
that its work has been well done. 

As usual, the Phoenix has taken part in all the activities of the Inter- 
collegiate Newspaper Association of the Middle Atlantic 
States. This year the newspaper won the cup offered by 
the association to the best college paper in the district, the 
reward being based upon excellence of news, editorial and 
advertising content. The staff feels justly proud of this 
honor, but realizes that it is in great part due to the co- 
operation of the three divisions of the staff, as well as the 
efforts of the undergraduate reporters who are serving 
their apprenticeship in this field. With such training, the 
retiring staff feels confident that next year's Phoenix will 
be in capable and responsible hands. Business Manager 




^ 



["HBI 



xB*n 



J 



L, 



H.Coles Martin Larzeleie Anderson 
Blackburn Palmenberg Coleman McBride Chandler 



SWARTHMORE PHOENIX 



Editor 
Philip E. Coleman 



Business Manager 
John F. McBride 



The Staff 

f Albert E. Blackburn, Jr., '29 
Associate Editors | Linda A. Chandler, 29 

( David J. Anderson, '29 
News Editors | Frank H. Martin, Jr., '29 

f » iTj;,^, Eleanor S. Burch, '29 

feature tditor , ,„„ 

c , iTJ.f^r Mary Anderson, 29 

Sports Editor - - i- * t i 'oq 

Alumni Editor "Caroline A. Lukens, 98 

Advertising Manager -;;• 0- Hammond Coles, 29 

Circulation Manager Elizabeth Palmenberg, 29 

Exchange Editor Lois D. Larzelere, 30 

Chairman Phoenix Board 

Christian B. Adelman, '29 



1 liW 



The 1930 Halcyon 







T 




Editor 



Associate Editor 



HE 1930 Halcyon staff has 
aimed to publish a book which 
should record in a permanent 

and artistic manner the activities and 

events of college life, which should 

perpetuate the traditions of the old 

Swarthmore as well as reflect the 

spirit of the newer and greater 

Swarthmore which is developing 

from it, and which should, in style 

and workmanship, reach a landmark 

in finer book-making. Realizing the 
difficulty of this ambitious undertaking, the staff hopes that the finished vol- 
ume will be judged not by its shortcomings, but by its innovations, not by its 
failures, but by its successes. It is in this spirit that you are asked to criticize 
this book. 

Turning to former editions of the Halcyon, the staff found that, although 
there was much which must necessarily be discarded, there was also much 
of permanent value in the style and content of the older volumes. Accord- 
ingly, this Halcyon will be found quite similar in many respects to the books 
which have preceded it; it will, however, contain much which is new to Halcyon 
pages. Many art, photographic, and editorial innovations have been made, 
and the whole book has ])een built about an architectural theme which will 
be recognized as truly Swarthmorean. 

In attempting to publish a finer and more distinctive Halcyon, the whole 
book has been finished with the best material, in the best style, and by the best 
workmanship available. The staff is epecially grateful to Mr. William Schilling, 
of the Schilling Press, for the personal care and excellent workmanship which 
he has put at our disposal and to Mr. William James, of the Philadelphia 
Photo-Engraving Company, for the advice and service which he has rendered 
us. The White Studio also deserves great credit for their excellent photo- 
graphic service and for the artistic portraits and photographs which add so 

much to this volume. 

The 1930 staff wishes to express its 
deep appreciation of the work done 
by the sophomore editorial and busi- 
ness candidates, whose efforts account 
largely for the success of this volume. 
The retiring staff feels sure that their 
newly elected successors will be ably 
qualified to publish the forty-sixth 
Halcyon. 






Associate Editor 



Business Manager 




Yerkes 



Longshore Laphani 

Buckwell Fisher Ackart Wolf 

McCloskey Kain Hoadley 



Geare 



Editor 
Richard M. Kain 




Business Manager 
Alex J. McCloskey 



The Sta 



Robert F. Bishop 

Malcolm Longshore.... 

Jean Fabringer 

Donald E. Buckwell.. 
Malcolm Longshore.. 

Edward Lapham 

George Hoadley 

Marion Geare 



Associate Editors Louise K. Yerkes 

..Assistant Business Managers Anna L. Biddle 

Organization Editor 

Junior Editors. Dorothy Wolf 

A thletic Editors. - Dorothy Ackart 

Feature Editors Sally Fisher 

Photographic Editors Lois Larzelere 

Art Editor 



[191 



Ctjris^tian ^s^s^ociation 



THE functions of Christian Associations are much aUke, and differ very 
slightly in various colleges. At Swarthmore, however, owing to the char- 
acter of the college and the life of the students they fulfill a somewhat 
different purpose. The task to which the average Y. M. C. A. or Y. W. C. A. 
sets itself is to provide a home-like spiritual atmosphere for the boy and girl 
away from home; but here this is more or less unnecessary, and the Asso- 
ciations attempt to solve more pertinent questions. They provide a means of 
helping college men and women learn how to face their modern social prob- 
lems, and offer occasion for discussion groups to stimulate thought and con- 
versation. Opportunity is given for intellectual recreation not only in dis- 
cussion, but also in the programs of talks and entertainments presented at 
the meetings. Delegates, moreover, are sent to the annual conference at Eagles- 
mere, and in this way the college groups are kept in contact with new and for- 
ward movements in the Christian Associations throughout the coimtry. 



Youiiig Women's Christiam Association 

ORGANIZED FEBRUARY, 1911 

President - Linda Chandler, '29 

Vice-President Elinor Brecht, '29 

SecretarY Kathr yn Sonneborn, '3 1 

Treasurer Lois Larzelere, '30 

Undergraduate Representative Josephine Tremain, '30 

CABINET 

Chairman Religious Committee Elinor Brecht, '29 

Chairman Social Committee Margaret Maltbie, '30 

Chairman Publicity Committee - Mary Anderson, '29 

Chairman Social Service Committee Anne Lefever, '29 

Chairman Finance Committee Sarah Brecht, '30 

Chairman Membership Committee Lois Larzelere, '30 



Y. M. C. A. AND Y. W. C. A. CONFERENCES 

FOLLOWING the custom of the past few years, the Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. 
C. A. met together for their conference at Eaglesmere, Pa., from June 
12-22, 1928. Much time was spent in individual groups where such 
subjects as International Relations, Getting the Most Out of Life, Campus 
Problems and The Place of the Church in Modern Life were discussed. Talks 
were also given by such interesting and well-known people as Sherwood Eddy, 
Arthur Rugh and Jack Hart. Many foreign representatives of the Workl Stud- 
ent Christian Federation met together for the purpose of discussing the promo- 
tion of more sound and Christian international relations. This conference was 
distinct in the fact that between the two periods into which it was divided and 
at the end there were two "retreat" days when the representatives could talk 
over and assimilate the ideas gained from the discussions. 

Free time was spent in baseball, tennis, swimming and other outdoor recrea- 
tions. There was a water carnival on the lake one evening, and as a fitting 
conclusion to the conference a candle service was held at which time the new 
council was installed. 

Swarthmore women were represented by Caroline Robison, '29; Linda 
Chandler, '29. who was co-chairman of the Conference; and Ruth Cleaver and 
Josephine Tremain, Class of 1930. The representatives for the men were Milton 
Atkinson. O. Hammond Coles and Frank Martin, all of the Class of 1929. 




Larzelere 
Lefevere 



Sonneborn 
Chandler 



S. Brecht 
E. Brecht 



Maltbie 
Tremaine 




Mn^it 



THE Musical Clubs at Swarthmore are coming more and more into prom- 
inence. A few years ago the only clubs in this field were the Glee Club 
and the Instrumental Club, composed solely of boys. Now there are 
in addition to these two a Chorvis of mixed voices, an Orchestra and a Band. 
The achievement of the Chorus and the Orchestra is due largely to the interest 
and efforts of Mr. Alfred J. Swan. Last year the two clubs combined presented 
one act of the operetta "Hugh the Drover", the first thing of its kind ever 
attempted here, and which proved so successful that it is to be given again 
this year. The inspiring leadership of Mr. Swan has shown what can be done 
along this comparatively undeveloped line. 

The Band was organized only two years ago, but so much interest has 
been shown by the students that it has grown rapidly and we are justly proud 
of its showing at football games. 

The Glee Club has always been one of the most live organizations on the 
campus and the annual Glee Club Concert and Prom is one of the most impor- 
tant events of the college year. 




The Swarthmore College Musical Clubs 



194' 




THE college musical clubs, under the direction of Professor Alfred J. 
Swan, again proved the worth of the musical talent of Swarthmore. An 
instrumental club, a trio, a quartet, and orchestra, and glee club choruses 
comprised the program for this year. 

The first performance of the clubs was presented in Atlantic City, Febru- 
ary 16, in the Chalfonte-Haddon Hall music room, through the courtesy of 
Leeds Lippincott and Company, owners of the hotels. The program was broad- 
cast through station WPG in Atlantic City. Following this there was a dance 
for all present at the concert. 

Next came the annual home concert, February 21, followed by the usual 
formal dance, with Harvey Marburger's orchestra in charge of the music. The 
very next day, the clubs departed for Washington, D. C, to give a concert at 
the Friends' School on the evening of February 22. 

The final program was presented at the Lansdowne Century Club, March 
8. Both the concert at Washington and the one at Lansdowne were followed 
by dances at which Ben Ludlow and his Garnet Serenaders provided the music. 

GLEE CLUB 

Director Alfred J. Swan 

Manager Parker P. King, '29 

Assistant Manager John S. Worth, '30 

Librarian William B. Wickersham, '29 

INSTRUMENTAL CLUB 
Edward Passmore, '30 William J aquette, '31 



William Eaton, '32 
John Dicky, '32 
Thomas Chambers, '31 



Harry Spogell, '32 
Gordon Lippincott, '31 
Walter Coleman, '29 



Clifford Baker, '31 



195 



Wrm 



f, 



Choms and Orcliestra 



THE Swartliniore College Chorus duplicated its outstanding; successes of 
last year when it again produced and staged Ralph \ aughan Williams' 
opera. "Hugh the Drover." This performance, given at Swarthmore on 
November 17 and at Haverford on December 10, was up to the standard of last 
year's success, and was favorably received by both audiences. The production 
of such an opera is a difficult undertaking and great credit is due the manager, 
Philip Blackburn, and the director. Professor Alfred J. Swan, to whose efforts 
the success of the production is largely due. 

The Spring Concert was given at Swarthmore on April 5, the program con- 
sisting of various selections from the Russian opera, "Sadko," by N. Rimsky- 
Korsakow. English madrigals also formed part of the program. 

The success of the Chorus and Orchestra in rendering programs of good 
music and in developing the appreciation of such music on the college campus 
is a valuable one, and the heights to which this organization has reached in its 
second year of existence have shown that this service has been appreciated, and 
that the Chorus and Orchestra have shown that its existence fulfills a definite 
need in undergraduate musical circles. 



196] 




Director Alfred J. Swan 

Manager Philip C. Blackburn, '29 

Assistant Manager George Hoadley, '30 

Librarian Alice Hutchinson, '29 

Costumers Grace Heritage, '29 

Louise Eaton, '29 

Executive Committee 

Walter Coleman, '29 Helen Gates, '32 

Esther Seaman, '31 Edward Passmore, '30 

Elizabeth Pearson, '29 Grace Heritage, '29 



L197] 



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BAND^ 

Jewell, Baker, Dowdy, Pittman, Williams 

Chambers, Johns, Wilson, Jaquette, Algeo 

Perloff, Park, Fussell, Sprague, Sprogell 

Bracht, McCune, Battin, Rieker, Milne, Jeffries, Muir 

THE Swarthmore band has in its third year of existence risen to a respect- 
able position among the college organizations. Its presence at football and 
basketball games has done much toward increasing the spirit of the stands 
and has added a great deal to the liveliness of the games. In garnet capes 
and hats it held its own on Franklin Field against the Penn band, and paraded 
the fields of F. and M. and Rutgers with equal success, proving itself worthy of 
an established position among college activities. 

The success of the past season has largely been due to the efforts of C. 
Thome Rieker, '29, the leader, who did much toward organization and improve- 
ment of the quality of music. Morton Milne, who managed the organization 
during the past season, will be leader during the coming season. 



■^ 



^ i kM 



I'lK I 




Dawes Lippincott Wickersham Ludlow Libby Turner Pittman Booth Mihie 



The Garnet Sereeaders 

THE dance orchestra organized last year by Everett U. Irish, '28, has 
achieved success this year as the Garnet Serenaders. Irish and James 
Muir, '28, are the only two of the nine original players who have graduated. 
Two freshmen, Benjamin Ludlow and Edward Dawes, have replaced these two 
men, and, under the leadership of the former, the orchestra has been kept 
more than busy with college dances, dances after glee club concerts, and out- 
side engagements. 



PERSONNEL 

Edward Dawes, '32 Piano 

Benjamin Ludlow, '32 Clarinet and Saxophone 

Gordon Lippincott, '31 Saxophone 

William Wickersham, '29 Saxophone 

Morton Milne, '30 _ Trombone 

Albert Pittman ._ _ _ Trumpet 

Donald Turner, '31 _ Banjo 

Robert Booth, '30.... _ _ ^..Bass 

Thomas Libby Drums 



I ) 1 ) 



[ 199; 



Bramattcg 



Dramatic interests at Swarthmore revolve about the Little Theatre Club, 
the One-Act Play course and the Commencement Play. Altogether, two Little 
Theater plays, three one-act play programs, and one Commencement play are 
given each year. 

The Little Theatre Club was organized for the purpose of stimulating in- 
terest in dramatics, as well as of encouraging student production of modern 
plays. The club gives two performances annually, and from the participants 
it elects new members each spring. The course in One-Act Plays has aroused 
much interest and enthusiasm in dramatics. It is given by Prof. Hicks, and 
alternates each year between One-Act Plays and Play Production. The Com- 
mencement Play is given annually in the Magill Auditorium, during Com- 
mencement week, heretofore by the Seniors, but this year the production will 
be presented by a combination of .luniors and Seniors and hereafter the play 
wall be produced by the Junior class. 



Little Theatre Clialb Plays 

As its second production of the year, the Little Theatre Club gave Sutton 
Bane's "Outward Bound" on April 26 and 27, 1928. It is a weird, un- 
earthly sort of play which the well-chosen cast presented in a way that 
will characterize it for all time as one of the best dramas ever given at Swarth- 
more. Mortimer Drake, 
'29, as Scrubby, the stew- 
ard of the boat which was 
"outward bound" to 
heaven and hell, did a 
marvelous piece of acting. 
The most interesting pas- 
sengers on this trip are a 
young couple, Anne, Bar- 
bara Pearson, '31, and 
Henry, James Michener, 
'29. Sarah Powell, '30, was 
excellent in the part of 
Mrs. Cliveden-Banks, a 
wealthy society w^oman, as 
was Christian Adelman, 
'29, as Mr. Lingley, the 
matter-of-fact business 
man. The part of Tom, 
the young fellow who has 
gone to the devil, was ad- a Scene from "The Dover Road" 





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[200] 




mirably taken by Theo- 
dore Fetter, '28; and the 
poor charwoman, Mrs. 
Midget, who turns ovit to 
be Tom's mother, was well 
portrayed by Sarah Fisher, 
'30. Paul Strong, '30, as a 
young divine completed 
the passenger list. At first 
none of the passengers can 
remember anything of 
their past or destinations, 
but as the trip progresses 
they realize what has hap- 
pened. In the end each 
one is judged and sen- 
tenced by the Great Exam- 
iner, Edward Passmore, 
'30, and Scrubby and the 
ship return for the next 
load of humanity. 

The presentation of A. A. Milne's play, "The Dover Road", on October 
27, 1928. proved the versatility of Swarthmore's dramatic students. Anne, 
Barbara Pearson, '31, and Leonard, Albert Blackburn, '29, who are eloping to 
France together, lose their way on the Dover Road and stop at the house of 
one Mr. Latimer, Mortimer Drake, '29. It turns out that he has set a trap 
to detain them there until they can decide whether they really love each other 
and wish to go on together. Both Leonard and Anne are thrown into very 
embarrassing situations, especially on meeting Leonard's wife, Eustasia, Kath- 
leen Quinn, '32, and Nicholas, Louis Kumpf, '29, who are also stopping there. 
Very amusing complications develop but finally the two men run away to 




Cast of "The Dover Road'' 




Powell Ackart Coles Forstner Blackburn Chandler Drake Robison Thompson 



201 



V 



France, Anne returns to her father, and Eustasia is left to nurse and coddle 
one of Mr. Latimer's sick servants. Dominic, the ever-correct and clever butler, 
was splendidly done by Howard Westwood, '31. The staff of servants, com- 
posed of Helen Brooke, '31, Elma Hurlock, '31, Allen Rowland, '31, and Rus- 
sell Jones, '32, added the finishing touch to the unusual atmosphere of Mr. 
Latimer's house. The play was coached by Esther Wilson, '27. 



Little Theatre Cleb 



OFFICERS 

President Albert E. Blackburn, '29 

■Secretary. Carolyn Forstner, '29 

Treasurer. Linda Chandler, '29 



MEMBERS 



Christian B. Adelman, '29 
Bradley Algeo, '29 
Mary Anderson, '29 
Albert E. Blackburn, '29 
Linda Chandler, '29 
Hammond Coles, '29 
Robert Dawes, '29 
Mortimer Drake, '29 
Carolyn Forstner, '29 
Marion Hall '29 



George Kain, "29 
Louis Kumpf, '29 
Caroline Robison, *29 
Dorothy Shoemaker, '29 
Betty Louise Thompson, '29 
Dorothy Ackart, '30 
Nancy Deane, '30 
Sarah D. Powell, '30 
Paul Strong, '30 
Mildred Underwood, '30 



I 2^)2 I 



Wr^ 



^^ 



ALFRED NO YES' 
"Sherwood" was 
presented by the 
Senior Class Friday night 
and Saturday morning, 
June first and second, 
1928, in the MagiU Out- 
door Auditorium. The 
appropriate setting and a 
large, well-balanced cast, 
coached competently by 
Dolly Oliver, ably por- 
trayed the romantic bit of 
English life. 

The roles of Maid Mar- 
ian and Queen Eleanor 
were unusually well done 
by Elizabeth Jenkins and 

Julie Chapman; and Arthur Baker and Newlin Smith, as Little John and 
Much, received great applause. Robin Hood, as done by C. Thobum Max- 
well, deserved special commendation; in fact, with such fine work as Marian 
and Robin for a criterion, the other members of the cast caught the spirit of 
the play, and without exception, played the various parts with distinction. 
Nell Rubins' interpretation of Shadow-of-a-Leaf gave the final touch to fittingly 
close the play. 

The stage settings were effective and sufficient in their simplicity, and the 
costuming left nothing to be desired. In short, the whole performance entirely 
deserved the immense amount of applause it received. 




A Scene from "Sherwood" 



I 201) I 




THE Play Production Class of last year completed its second semester's 
work by the presentation of four one-act plays written by Swarthmore 
students and submitted in a competition from which they were selected 
by Jasper Deeter of the Hedgerow Theater. First prize was awarded to '"After 
Glory," written by C. Tholjurn Maxwell, '28, and coached by Esther Feher, '28. 
It was an excellent presentation of a very real college problem. The leading role 
was played by the author; those of his fellow students by Louis Kumpf, '29, Paul 
Strong, '30, Dorothy Shoemaker, '29, Eleanor Powell, "29, Margaret WaUon, '29, 
Jean Fahringer, '30, Haines FeUer, '30, Edward Passniore, '30, Walter Muir, '29, 
and Thomas Moore, '28. 

"People Praying", a powerful and fantastic allegory by Selden Trimble, '28, 
was awarded second prize. The difficult parts were extremely well acted by 
Betty Lou Thompson, '29, Walter Coleman, '29, and Evaristo Murray, '29, the 
play being coached by Frances Porter, Class of '28. 

Third was "Valse Interlude", a blank verse fantasy of Pierrot and Pierrette, 
written by Beatrice Beach, '31, and produced with artistic effects of music and 
lighting. Pierrette was played by Marion Hall, '29, and Pierrot by Olive Deane, 
'28; Harlequin by Catherine Hatfield, '30, and Columbine by Virginia Stratton, 
'30. The dancers who made up the rest of the cast were Charlotte Salmon and 
Edna Griffiths of '28, Sophie Stem, Bertha Hull, Elizabeth Palmenburg, and 
Grace Heritage of '29, Ruth Cleaver, Helen Bessemer, and Frances Eaton of '30. 
The play was coached and directed by Marion Hall and Beatrice Beach. 

The comedy of the evening was furnished by '"Stage Kisses" of Robert 
Dawes, '29, coached by Nell Rubins. Mr. Dawes himself played the part of the 
director in this take-off of play production; assisting him in the cast were Marion 
Collins, '29, Donald Buckwell, '30, Will McLain, '29, Jeannette Poore, '28, Julie 
Champan, '28, and Louise Yerkes, '30. 

This year Dr. Hicks offered the course in One- Act Play which alternates with 
Play Production. The first bill of the class was presented privately in the Little 
Theatre, early in the year. It consisted of eight plays, taking two successive 
nights. The first night were presented "The Far-Away Princess", coached by 
Betty Lou Thompson, '29; "The Exchange", coached by Ruth Cleaver, '30; "Who- 
soever Shall Be Saved", a play written by Beatrice Beach, '31 and coached by 
Sylvia Windle, '29; and "The Twelve Pound Look", coached by Margaret Walton, 
'29. The plays given the second night were "Hyacinth Halvey", coached by 
Mortimer Drake, '29; "Codes", a play by Gwendolyn Norton, '31 and coached by 
Betty Pearson, '29; "The Stranger", coached by Dorothy Shoemaker, '29; and 
"The Dollar", coached by Robert Dawes, '29. 

The first public bill was presented in Collection Hall on the night of Decem- 
ber 14, — to an audience much depleted by flu and the premature closing of 
college, but an audience none the less enthusiastic and sympathetic. Four plays 
only were given, but each had been produced in trial performance by competi- 
tive casts, a committee of judges deciding which cast should make the public 
presentation. 

The successful cast of "The Valiant", by Hall and Middlemass, had been 
coached by Betty Lou Thompson, 29. Hugh McDiarmid, '30, held the audience 
with his performance of Dyke, the young man about to be electrocuted for 



204] 



murder. The part of his young sister was taken by Beatrice Beach, '31. Ed- 
ward Passmore, '30, played the warden, Frank Martin, '29, the priest, and Walter 
Muir, '29, a prison attendant. 

The second play, "The Drama Class", is so constructed that Giacosa's play, 
"Sacred Ground" is given as a part of the entertainment for members of the 
class. The rather typical woman's clvib was well represented by six of our 
actresses: Nancy Deane, "30, as Mrs. Bennett the hostess; Frances Eaton, '30, as 
the chairman, Mrs. Fessenden, and Eleanor Powell, '29, Josephine Tremaine, 
'30, Florence Hearne, '31, Elizabeth Walls, '31, the other members of the class. 
The play was coached by Rvith Cleaver, '30. 

"Sacred Grovuid" is a highly dramatic and emotional bit of Italian play- 
writing. Howard Westwood and Margaret Orr, both of '31, played the parts of 
Paolo and his wife, Anna. Paolo's brother was acted by Allen Howard, '31, and 
serving-woman Maddalena by Sarah Fisher, '30. Sylvia Windle, '29, directed 
the cast. 

The fourth play was a farce by A. A. Milne, "The Man in the Bowler Hat," 
and was coached by Dorothy Shoemaker, '29. The two chief parts were played 
by Will T. Jones, '31, as John, and Virginia Stratton, '31, as his wife, Mary. 
The others of the cast were the hero and heroine, — Clement Riddle. '31, and 
Elizabeth Ogden, '29; the villain, Alexander McCloskey, '30; and the bad man, 
Nox Kehew, '31. Mr. Dawes, of the class of '29, held the title role. 

The course presented a second pvdjlic l)ill in Collection Hall on the evening 
of March fifteenth. The casts were again the result of competitive acting for 
three of the plays, the other two being done Ijy originally assigned casts. 

"The Beaded Buckle," a play from the Carolina Playmakers, was acted by 
Eliabeth Ogden, '29, John McBride, '29, Florence Hearne, '31, and Dorothy Wolf, 
Frances Eaton, and Donald Buckwell, all of '30. Margaret Walton, '29, was coach 
of the play. 

A Spanish "Svmny Morning," coached by Betty Lou Thompson, was next on 
the program, with Howard Westwood, '31, Josephine Tremaine, '30, Margaret 
Spencer, '30, and Morton Milne, '30. This was billed as a "dramatic incident," — 
the story of a reunion of two old lovers. 

The comedy-farce of the evening was "Speaking to Father," a play of George 
Ade, coached by Robert Dawes, '29 — distinctly the coach's own production. 
Edward Passmore, '30, had the lead, and Sophie Stern, '29, played the part of 
his wife. The others in the cast were Elizabeth Walls, '31, Clement Riddle, '31, 
Will Jones, '31, and Rosamond Walling, '31. 

Edna St. Vincent Millay's fantasy, "Two Slatterns and a King," was the fourth 
play on the program. It was very cleverly produced, featured by music through- 
out, and artistic use of the spotlight. Chance was played by Elma Hurlock, '31, 
the two slatterns by Virginia Stratton, '30, and Grace Heritage, '29, and, the 
king by Eleanor Powell, '29. The coach was Retty Pearson, '29. 

The last piece on the program was one of Eugene O'Neill's plays of the sea, 
"In the Zone," — with an all-male cast. Hugh MacDiarmid played the leading 
role of Smitty. Members of the crew were William Lednum, '30, Frank Martin, 
'29, Will McLain, '29, Albert Hood, '31, O. Hammond Coles, '29, PhiUp Cole- 
man, '29, William McCime, '31, Nox Kehew, '31. Mortimer Drake, '29 coached 
the production. 

Settings for the plays were executed by O. Hammond Coles and Will McLain; 
and the business was managed by Louis Kiimpf, '29. 



[205 



Bebatins 



INTERCOLLEGIATE debating started at Swarthmore soon after the first 
debate between Harvard and Yale in 1892. The teams, under the old sys- 
tem of debating, consisted of three men from each college on opposing 
sides. The decision was given by three or five judges, for the skill of the de- 
baters, rather than for the merits of the arguments. 

When the Oxford debaters came to this country five years ago they 
brought with them a revolution in this field. Swarthmore was on Oxford's 
first schedule, and accepted this new system immediately. This new style was 
very informal. Either one competent judge or the audience gave the decision. 
The new teams consisted of two men, with one speaker from each college 
arguing either side of the question. This did away with any favoritism in re- 
gards to decisions. Following every debate there was an open discussion for 
the audience. So far Swarthmore has found this system very satisfactory. It 
gives opportunities for open discussion and does not make victory the chief 
end of the debaters. 

The Debate Season 

THIS year's debate season continued the practice of last year by devoting 
part of the season to participation in intercollegiate contests and part 
to discussion groups of Swarthmore teams before outside clubs. Three 
questions were chosen for discussion this year. The questions involve the con- 
sideration of the influence of advertising on public welfare; of state-owned 
and developed water power and of the advisability of adopting the Swarthmore 
system of reading for honors in other colleges. 

In the field of intercollegiate activity, the Swarthmore speakers have 
already engaged Western Reserve College, Dartmouth and St. Joseph. They 
will soon meet Hillsdale, Haverford, Bryn Mawr and Johns Hopkins. The 
Haverford contest should prove the most interesting forensic encounter of 
the year. The question of the advisability of fraternities on a college campus 
will be discussed by split teams of the two institutions. The Bryn Mawr de- 
bate likewise marks an innovation as it is the Garnet's first venture in co- 
educational debating. 

Men^s Debate 

Manager Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 

Assistant Manager _ Barton P. Ferris, '30 

f Everett L. Hunt, 
Coaches \ Franklin B. Folom 

INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATERS 

James H. Booser, '31 George Hay Kain, Jr., '29 William Poole, '30 

Irvin Burton, '31 Richard M. Kain, '30 John Skinner, '31 

Carl Dellmuth, '31 Clark Kerr, '32 Robert C. Sonneman, '32 

Barton P. Ferris, '30 Robert E. Kintner, '31 Howard C. Westwood, '31 



[ 206 




Sonneman Kintner 

Kerr Dellmuth Poole Hoadley Burton Booser 

Ferris Calhoun Hunt Folsom R. Kain 



SCHEDULE 

Freshman-Sophomore at Swarthmore. 

October 25, 1928. (Hoover-Smith). 
Swarthmore with Y. M. H. A. at Philadelphia. 

November 5, 1928. (Hoover-Smith). 
Swarthmore with Western Reserve at Swarthmore. 

December 7, 1928. {Advertising). 
Swarthmore Teams at Media 'V^ omen's Clnb. 

December 12, 1928. {Advertising). 
Swarthmore with Dartmouth at Philadelphia Ethical Cuhure Society. 

December 16, 1928. (Advertising). 
Swarthmore with St. Joseph's at Philadelphia. 

March 1, 1929. (Advertising). 
Swarthmore with Hillsdale at Swarthmore. 

March 15, 1929. ( Water Poiver) . 
Swarthmore with Haverford at Swarthmore. 

April 12, 1929. {Fraternities). 
Swarthmore Freshmen with Haverford Freshmen at Haverford. 

April 12, 1929. 
Swarthmore with Brvn Mawr at Bryn Mawr. 

April 19, 1929. ' {Advertising). 



207 




Fishe 



Filer 
Hunt 



Eaton Belts 

Folsom Reinholt 



THE debate season this jear. although shorter than those of previous 
years, was very successful. The schedule consisted of seven debates, four 
of which were intercollegiate, one inter-class, and two intra-mural. The 
latter were aiiven before the Media Women's Club and the Springfield Women's 
Club. 

Three subjects have been debated this vear: Advertising. Imperialism, and 
Water Power, all of which have proved interesting topics. Although not many 
of the debates were at home, the team has been rewarded for its efforts by 
the cooperation the students have shown and the interest they have taken in 
the debates. 



Manager Winona Van Ammon 

A ssistant Manager - Dorothy Wolf 

Coach Dorothy Wolf 



Olive Filer, '29 
Marion Hall, '29 
Frances Eaton, '30 
Mary Temple, '30 



TEAM 

Mary Betts, '31 
Louise Fisher, '31 
Edna Pusey, '32 
Eleanor Pusey, '32 
Frances Reinhold, "32 



^^ 



) ■' ^ 



2081 



WOMEN'S DEBATE SCHEDULE 

October 25 Freshman-Sophomore Debate. 

December 12 Media Women's Club (Advertising) at Media. 

February 8 George School (Imperialism) at George School. 

February 18 Springfield Women's Club iWater-Power) at Springfield. 

February 23 Cornell University (Water-Poiver) at Cornell. 

March 1 George Washington University {Advertising) at Washington. 

May 3 George Washington University (Advertising) at Swarthmore. 



The Foreim 

THE Swarthmore Forum is an imdergraduate organization for the purpose 
of informing students on prominent problems of the times through the 
medium of speakers and lecturers who are leaders in their various fields. 
It was organized but a few years ago, and has already grown to such prom- 
inence that its activities are recognized as an integral part of extra-curricular 
affairs at Swarthmore. 

After thoroughly considering the pressing questions in the minds of Swarth- 
more undergraduates, the Executive Board of the Forum gets in touch with 
noted speakers in the respective fields, and arranges for them to lecture on 
the Swarthmore campus without charge to the student body. The fall and 
winter season of 1928-9 has seen the peak of the Forum's activity, and the 
topics discussed have covered a wide variety of politics, the race problem, and 
the Chinese problem. 

The greatest work of the organization was the formation of three political 
clvibs which were active in maintaining student interest in the national presi- 
dential campaign. Each of the three groups — The Republican, the Democrat, 
and the Socialist — brought a speaker to Collection to present its side of the 
political controversy. It was also under the auspices of this organization that 
a triangular debate between Professors Brooks, Fraser and Holmes was held. 
The political activity culminated in a poll of the student body and faculty, which 
resulted in a majority for the Republican candidate. 

Carroll I. Beedy, Republican congressman from Maine, was the first, of 
the speakers, appearing in Collection on Friday, October 12th. He was fol- 
lowed by Henry Moskowitz, personal friend and biographer of Alfred E. Smith, 
who spoke in behalf of the Democrat's candidacy. Norman E. Thomas, the 
Socialist nominee himself, appeared as the last of the trio on October 16 to 
present the socialistic cause. 

The first of the Forum's regular speakers was Allan Frelon. negro artist 
and one of the art directors of the Philadelphia negro schools. He spoke in 
Bond Memorial on January 3, taking as his subject, "The Contribution of the 
Negro to Fine Arts." This was one of the first times that the Forum audience 
had been able to listen to a discussion of the race problem. 



209 




Calhoun 



Roberts 



Ferris 



The February speaker was Dr. James M. \ ard. Dean of Religious Activ- 
ities at Northwestern University. He discussed the tremendous obstacles that 
confront those who are attempting to hasten and further the "awakening'' 
M'hich is now taking place in China. His talk was highly interesting and full 
of valuable information gathered from a stay of fifteen j'ears in Chinese 
territory. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD OF THE FORUM 



President _ Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 

Vice-president Mar\- Roberts. "29 

Secretary Barton P. Ferris. "30 

Women's Debate Manager. _.Winona Von Ammon. '29 

Mens Debate Manager _ Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 




departmental Clubss 

THE Departmental Clubs of Swarthmore College have been organized 
at various times in the past for the purpose of bringing together those 
particularly interested in any of the various fields of intellectual activity. 
Several of these clubs are responsible each year for lectures delivered to mem- 
bers of the clubs, and often to the student body. They are a most valuable 
and essential part of the colleae organization for forwarding the practical 
application of knowledge, and for bringing new interest and inspiration to 
Swarthmore. 

Endish Club 



^ 




L 

L.Fisher Stauffer Norton Mix Headley Briggs S.Fisher Hurlock 
Bessemer Castle Worth Ogden Harris Hamming Yerkes Tremain 

OFFICERS 

President..:... Elizabeth Ogden, '29 

SecretaryZIZZ. Marion M. Hall, '29 

Treasurer Marion C. Harris, '29 

MEMBERS 
Louise K. Yerkes, '30 Gwendolyn Norton, '31 Rebecca Castle. '30 

Beatrice Beach, '31 Barbara Pearson, '31 Sarah Fisher, '30 

Barbara Briggs, '31 Marjorie Starboard, '31 Eleanor Flexner. "30 

Louise Fisher. '31 Marion C. Harris, '29 Marian Hamming, '30 

Elma Hurlock, '31 EHzabeth Ogden, '29 Helen Headley, '30 

Mar<faret K. Mix, '31 Helen Bessemer, '30 Josephine Tremain, '30 

Elizabeth P. Walls, '31 
Marian M. Hall, '29, Associate Member 
Margaret Worth, '29, Associate Member 



211' 




L. Larzelere Bamberger Brougher 
Anders H. Larzelere Tily Robinson Walton 



OFFICERS 

President Lily Tily, '29 

Secretary-Treasurer Helen Larzelere, '29 



OFFICERS 

President Roberta Boak 

Vice-President Roberta Norton 

Secretary-Treasurer Dorothy Wolf 



^3 



[212] 




J. Brecht Kirsch 
Stafford E. Brecht 



Jaquette 
Palmenberg 



OFFICERS 

President... William E. Kirsch, '31 

Secretary-Treasurer Priscilla Bacon, '31 



The Philosophy Club 

THE Philosophy Club is organized for the purpose of holding discussions 
of religious, philosophical, and ethical problems. There is no special mem- 
bership of the club, and the meetings, which are held occasionally, are 
open to anyone who is interested in discussing problems along the lines referred 
to above. The club is under the direction of Dr. Brand Blanshard, Ur. Jesse 
Holmes, and Dr. George Thomas, all members of the philosophy department of 
the college. 

Officers 

President Richard Kain, '30 

Secretary Ruth Jackson, '30 



I { i 



213 




Prof. Creighton 
Delaney 



Altstaetler Lutton Wilson 
Leach Emley Diamond Jillson Blum Prof. Cox 
Maltbie Eisenstaedt Chambers Wood Weigand 



THE CHEMISTRY CLUB was organized in the fall of 1928. Majors in 
chemistry and students interested in the subject are eligible for member- 
ship. The society aims to supplement the curricular work of the Department 
of Chemistry, as well as to further discussion of chemical problems. Meetings 
are featured by speakers of prominent position in the scientific world. Frequent 
visits are made to near-by industrial plants, where first-hand information con- 
cerning chemistry in the industries is gathered. Activities of this sort aid the 
student not only in his academic study, but also in selecting a line of work which 
he may pursue further. 

OFFICERS 

President Edgar I. Eisenstaedt, '30 

Vice-President Frederick G. Weigand, '29 

Secretary Margaret McC. Maltbie, '30 

Treasurer Thomas S. Chambers, '31 



[214: 



Tlie Trotter Biological Society 



fi 




Coles McVangh James Ricker 
Hamilton McKensie Paxon Stauffer Dowdy 
Darlington Schreiber Reynolds 



Taylor Van Amnion 



The Trotter Biological Society offers to students in this department a means 
of furthering their scientific interests, beyond the normal curricular work. Promi- 
nent speakers and student discussions feature the meetings of the Society. 
Sophomore, Jimior, and Senior majors in the biological sciences are eligible 
for membership. 



OFFICERS 

President Horace F. Darlington, '29 

V ice-President Winona Von Ammon, '29 

Secretary Clara Bond Taylor, '30 

Treasurer Frederick C. Schreiber, '30 



213 




Engineers' Cliifo 

Organized 1915 




Fussell Jewett Fergus Harvey Sprague Powell Turner Battiii Skinner Noyes 

Cresson Lewis Parke Tomasetti Tyson Lamey Rushmore Winde Nicely 

Yang Haskell Roth Smith Keefer Bordelais Williams Keller V. Selover R. Selover 

Lippincott Hunt Wiegand Egleson Delaney Hoadley Cohen Algeo 

Spangler Wickersham King White Moore 



THE ENGINEERS' CLUB, founded in 1915, has for its purpose the increas- 
ing of student interest and knowledge on problems which would not 
ordinarily come up for discussion in the classes; and to give aid in the 
choosing of an engineering career after graduation. All those who major in 
engineering are eligible for membership. The club is under the joint leadership 
of Professor Charles G. Thatcher, chairman of the division of Engineering, and 
an undergraduate President. 



The officers of the club this year were as follows: 

President Bradley Algeo, '29 

Vice-President Anthony Spangler, '29 

Secretary-Treasurer George Hoadley, '30 




-LC 



atljletit!^ 




■rfWj' 



# 






Ij 




rDey, iO 




[217] 



S\rARTH]MORE"S first interest in athletics runs back many years — back to 
1869 when the college was first opened. At this time and up to 1880 there 
was practically no interest in organized sports. Tliis was partlv due to the 
unsettled state of the rising yoimg college and partly to the disapproval of the 
Board of Managers, who placed nimierous restrictions on athletic competition 
for some time. 

The athletic constitution of 1882 gave an enormous impetiis to the Garnet's 
aeti'vities and marked the beginning of various forms of athletic endeavors. 1882 
saw Swarthmore ^dth two main sports. Football of the push and pull style ^vith 
forty-five minute halves on a much larger field than the modern one. and track 
in which bicycle riding was one of the featiu-es. were present, although poorlv 
organized. Their disorganization was due to administration restrictions ^sliich 
included, quoting from an old Halcyon — "restricted to t^vo annual games 'SN'ith 
Haverford: to be forbidden to plav all other colleges either home or abroad: to 
be prohibited from charging admission to the few games plaved: to have inter- 
collegiate athletics severelv frowned upon and interclass contests regarded in no 
very favorable light ." 

Gradually, however, the faculty began to adopt a more liberal attitude and 
in the early 80"s Garnet athletics, both in the interclass and in some degree the 
intercollegiate field, developed amazingly. In 1885 the Swarthmore Frosh 
chalked up their fourth victori,- in as many years over the Haverford Frosh. thus 
sho'w-ing the beginning of the later superiority of the Garnet pigskin chasers over 
the Mainliners. In the same year the class of "89 beat Perm 3.5-0. 

1888 marked the prime step of the college in fostering athletic development. 
In that year the Board of Managers, recognizing that "the best development of 
an individual requires the careful training of his phvsical no less than his in- 
tellectual powers." created a Department of Physical Culture at Swarthmore 
^vdth power for directing athletic competition. 

For a short time allied class games remained as big a factor in the earnest 
athletics as did the future "varsity competition." Frosh and Juniors versus the 
Sophomores and Seniors were the usual lineups of the day. Competition took 
place not only in football and handicap races but class hockey on the Crum was 
a favorite pastime. In 1895 the siun of SlOO was appropriated for supplying the 
football squad ^oth equipment while at the same time the first organized cheer- 
ing was begun. 

The last few years of the nineteenth century- and the t^ventieth century to 
date mark the rise of Swarthmore to a top position in intercollegiate athletics. 
The credit for this rise was due to a great extent to the untiring work of Dr. 
J. K. Snell, one of the greatest of Swarthmore physical directors. 

We have already seen track and football rising ■\\"ith the college from its birth 
in the early seventies. Under the directions of "Doc" Snell. lacrosse, wliich had 
been used as a means of conditioning for track, up to the middle of the nineties, 
was introduced in 1898 as a college sport ^oth an organized team. In 1903 
basketball made its debut with an intercollegiate schedule. Closely on its heel 
in 1909 baseball was recognized. Swarthmore had had a baseball team even be- 



2181 




fore football but lack of available men had forced its abandonment. Approxi- 
mately twelve years ago soccer entered as a minor sport and has since developed 
by means of an enviable record to its position in the major column of the 
Garnet sport roll. Tennis, likewise, made its debut a short time before and has 
also become a recognized major sport. This brings the total of the Garnet's 
activities to the seven sports each awarding to its varsity plays the "S." Swim- 
ming which began with the erection of the Sharpless Pool in the Hall gym- 
nasium, was abandoned last year by vote of the Men's Athletic Association. 

Football was at its height in the last years of the nineteenth and the first 
of the twentieth centuries. From '98 to 1907 with the exception of one season, 
that of 1902, the Garnet kept an average of winning nine out of eleven games, 
beating such teams as Cornell, Navy, Penn and Lafayette. Since that time the 
Garnet has maintained a fair superiority over its opponents, many of whom were 
from extremely large schools. Victories over Penn in 1906 and 1912 and 1918 
shine out as the most important of later years. The football seasons have been 
continuous since its initiation with the exception of 1908 when the sport was 
dropped for a year. 

In the twentieth century the authorities of the college were presented with 
a difficult decision. The Jeanes fund, totaling millions, was offered as a dona- 
tion to Swarthmore if it would adopt the policy of abandonment of intercol- 
legiate athletics. The college refused the offer and thus made possible the 
great intercollegiate records of the later teams. 

Basketball was one of the leaders in intercollegiate activity. In 1911 nine 
out of a twelve-game schedule were won. Of these nine one was dropped by a 
point margin and the others by extremely narrow ones. Probably one of the 
outstanding achievements of past Garnet teams was the winning of eight suc- 
cessive games from Penn. Since that time the Garnet seasons have been 
mediocre. In general the quintet has won a majority of its games. In Haver- 
ford games Swarthmore still holds an edge. With six victories and six defeats 
this season showed traces of brilliant playing against Lehigh but a great deal 
of mediocrity during the rest of the season. The Haverford defeat marred one 
of the most successful seasons in recent years. 

From its inception in 1898 Lacrosse has had phenomenal success on the 
Garnet schedule. From 1898 to 1904 the team developed remarkably. During 
these years Harvard, Columbia, Lehigh, Johns Hopkins felt the sting of defeat. 
However, in 1904 and 1905 the sport reached its height. Under the leadership 
of J. Archer Turner the team won the American Intercollegiate Championship 
in '05. In the first season the racquet wielders won 10 games and scored eighty- 
one points to their opponents seventeen. Penn, Cornell, Harvard, Columbia, 
Lehigh, Stevens, Harvard, Hopkins, Virginia and Toronto fell in the Little 
Quakers rush to the American Championship. The next year found the same 
teams losers with the exception of Toronto which defeated the Garnet for Amer- 
ican honor and forced it to be satisfied with the United States Championship. 

1906 found the team still successful but unable to coop a championship. The 
United States championship was lost to Johns Hopkins by a 4-5 score and the 



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[ 219 ] 



American to Toronto by a 3-4 count. L. A. Whitehead of Toronto, was then coach 
of the team. 1910 saw Swarthmore again \J. S. Champion but ousted from the 
American title by Toronto with a single goal. The entrance of baseball and the 
former minor sports at this time caused quite a decrease in lacrosse enthusiasm. 
However, in 1912 the Garnet won the Championship of the southern division 
but were defeated by Harvard for the United States title. 

Since that time no championships have been won nor have any unsuccessful 
seasons been experienced. 1923 found the Garnet losing only to Hopkins and 
subsequent seasons mai-ked a majority on the winning coliunn. 

Baseball's record contains no championships. It has, however, won most of 
its games. The seasons of 1922 and 1923 stand out with more than three-quarters 
of the games won by the Garnet. The sport has developed several players for 
the big league "parks." "Curly" Ogden, '22, and George Earnshaw are good 
examples. Last year's victory over Haverford shines as the most brilliant in 
later seasons. 

Tennis, too, although formerly handicapped by lack of a coach has turned 
in remarkable successes. The 1923 undefeated season and 1926 and 1928 Middle 
Atlantic States Championships are good examples of its success. On recognition 
of this championship and the great success of the netnien in recent years, tennis 
has been made a major sport. 

Soccer stands out as gaining the greatest success of any sport at Swarthmore. 
From a minor sport in 1918 to a major one the rise has been from a poor team 
to one of championship calibre. During 1916 and 1917 few victories were chalked 
up and those were such teams as the Gennantown Boys Club, Moorestown Friends 
and George School. 1918 found the college ready to abandon the sport but in- 
creased interest forced another season. Enrolled in the Intercollegiate Soccer 
League of Pennsylvania, the Garnet hooters scored three straight championships. 
During these years Lehigh, Pennsylvania and Haverford jayvees fell before the 
Garnet. In 1922 and 1923 Swarthmore lost the championship to Penn but the 
Swarthmore eleven scored against Navy, N. Y. U. and Haverford. 

During the last four years Swarthmore has advanced from State Champion- 
ship to tie with Yale for the Intercollegiate Championship of America. After the 
breakup in the league in 1926 Swarthmore signed up for the Intercollegiate 
League consisting of one hundred twenty-one large universities and colleges of 
the East. In 1928 the team hit the stride by defeating Princeton, Temple, Navy, 
Lehigh and Haverford and amassing twenty-nine goals to their opponents' five. 
On recognition of the success of the season, soccer has been raised to a major 
sport. 

There has been a marked expansion during the last regime of Dr. Leroy 
Mercer, who succeeded Doc Snell in 1914, two years before Dr. Samuel Copeland 
Palmer, '95, a football and track star, had become graduate manager. Under 
their direction and under the direction of Mr. Charles G. Thatcher who followed 
Dr. Palmer, Swarthmore's seven varsity sports have reached a high plane of 
intercollegiate competition. 

Swarthmore is at present well equipped to cope with the athletic desires 
of her students. Seven varsity sports, each with its Junior Varsity and Freshman 
teams; intramural and interclass games offer an abundance of opportunity to the 
men. Hockey, basketball, field day events, swimming, tennis, gym, and May Day, 
likewise give great leeway for the physical development of women. Compulsory 
athletics are the order for the physically able and the result is that a great 
majority of the college participate. 

Swarthmore at present has one chronic need in the athletic world — that of a 
new gymnasium to cope with the increasing demand of Garnet athletic life. Its 
need is recognized in all quarters. With the erection of a new gymnasium the 
Garnet will be more firmly entrenched in its high position of athletic develop- 
ment. 



Wiamers of the "S 



FOOTBALL 
Wilbur M. McFeely, Captain 
Joseph L. Atkinson Carl K. Dellmvitli 



Lincoln Atkiss 
Curtis E. Barnes 
Robert L. Bootb 
Irwin G. Burton 
Frank S. Christian 
Paul Crowl 



Benjamin C. Haviland 
Harry Ileward 
Morris L. Hicks 
H. Thomas Hallowell 
Paul M. James 
Thomas S. Keefer 



Robert S. Testwuide 



Thomas M. Brown, Manager 
N. Hugh McDiarmid 
Horace McGuire 
William McLain 
Henry L. Parrish 
Robert B. Redman 
Daniel Sinclair 
Joseph T. Sullivan 
Harold E. Wagner 



SOCCER 
Christian B. Adelman, Captain Harold Edward Snyder, Manager 

Richard C. Bond C. Bertram Hammell C. William Potts 

Louis S. Bringhurst Howard C. Johnson Henry Rudy 

James S. Burr John R. LeCron Walter R. Seibert 

Henry B. Coles John F. McBride F. Fisher White 



BASKETBALL 
Hvigh McDiarmid, Captain 

James B. Burr Howard C. Johnson 

Carl K. Dellmuth Robert B. Redman 



Walter R. Seibert, Manager 
Thomas P. Sharpies 
Robert S. Testwuide 



BASEBALL 

William McCook, Captain 

Christian B. Adelman John Cookenback 

Curtis L. Barnes Carl K. Dellmuth 

James B. Burr Howard C. Johnson 

Irwin G. Burton Wilbur M. McFeely 



James Colket, Manager 

Horace McGuire 
Robert B. Redman 
Daniel Sinclair 
Ralph W. Tipping 



John W. Dutton, Captain 
Francis C. Alden 
Joseph L. Atkinson 
Arthur G. Baker 



TRACK 

Howard Boyer 
Howard Baker 
Louis K. Clothier 
Charles E. Tilton 



Harold Berry, Manager 
J. Gordon Lippincott 
C. Thoburn Maxwell 
Henry L. Parrish 



Ellis Bishop, Captain 
Robert F. Bishop 
William A. Boone 
Vincent G. Bush 
Robert H. Douglas 
Robert L. Gould 
H. Thomas Hallowell 



LACROSSE 

Benjamin C. Haviland 
Harry Heward 
Edward C. McFeely 
Rogers McVaugh 
James R. Miller 
Edward M. Passmore 



Theodore Widing. 
Laurence M. Russell 
Thomas P. Sharpies 
Joseph T. Sullivan 
Ferris Thomsen 
Harold Wagner 
Orville Wright 



Manager 



TENNIS 

Alexander MacDougall, Manager 

Thomas M. Brown Myer Cohen Hugh McDiarmid 

Gordon Hodge Thomas S. Nicely 



Bertram Hammel, Captain 



) ) \ > 



f22r 




Association 

Organized November 14, 1877 
Motto: "Mens sana in cor pore sano." 

OFFICERS 1928-1929 

President James B. Burr, '29 

Vice-President Thomas Brown, '29 

Secretary Bertram Hammell, '30 

Graduate Manager . Charles G. Thatcher, '11 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

President A. A James B. Burr, '29 

Secretary A. A Bertram Hammell, '30 

Graduate Manager Charles G. Thatcher, '11 

Physical Director E. Leroy Mercer, M.D. 

Football Captain Wilbur M. McFeely, '29 

Baseball Captain Bertram Adelman, '29 

Basketball Captain Hugh McDiarmid, '30 

Track Captain Francis Alden, '30 

Lacrosse Captain Thomas Sharpies, '29 

Soccer Captain C. B. Adelman, '29 

Tennis Captain Thomas S. Nicely, '30 

Football Manager, 1928 Thomas M. Brown, '29 

Baseball Manager, 1929 H. E. Snyder, '29 

Basketball Manager, 1929 W. R. Seibert, '29 

Track Manager, 1929 Henry B. Seaman, '29 

Lacrosse Manager, 1929 Mortimer Drake, '29 

Soccer Manager, 1928 Harold E. Snyder, '29 

Tennis Manager, 1929 F. Fisher White, '29 

Football Manager, 1929 Howard E. Boyer, '30 

Baseball Manager, 1930 Alexander McCloskey, '30 

Basketball Manager, 1930 Paul T. Strong, '30 

Track Manager, 1930 Franklin C. Eden, '30 

Lacrosse Manager, 1930 Ray P. Hunt, '30 

Soccer Manager, 1929 William Poole, '30 

Tennis Manager, 1930 Edward M. Lapham, '30 

Cheer Leader Shaler Stidham, '29 

Assistant Cheer Leader John S. Worth, '30 

Assistant Cheer Leader Morton A. Milne, '30 




THE purpose of this club is "to hold the interest of Varsity Club alumni 
in Swarthmore athletics, to encourage students to go out more for athletic 
honors, to discourage athletes from breaking training, and to strive for high 
standards of sportsmanship in all Swarthmore athletics." 

Only Juniors and Seniors are eligible to active membership. Sophomore 
letter men are eligible to associate membership, while Freshmen may attend 
meetings after they have won a letter. Members of the club may be recognized 
by the oblong garnet and white button worn on the coat label. Diagrams of 
a football, baseball or soccer field, a basketball floor, a track, lacrosse sticks or 
a tennis racket on the button indicate the sport in which the letter was won. 



President Thomas P. Sharpies, '29 

Vice-President Christian B. Adelman, '29 

Secretary-Treasurer Harry Heward, Jr., '29 



lil 



223 1 



Jfoottiall 



^ 



/ 



Captain McFeely 



ITH a record of half a dozen victories 
out of eight starts, the Swarthmore 
College football team enjoyed one of 
the most successful seasons of recent years. 
Washington, Susquehanna, Johns Hopkins, 
Delaware, Franklin and Marshall, and 
Ursinus all succumbed to the powerful on- 
slaught of the Garnet team, but the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania and Rutgers Univer- 
sity proved to be too strong for the Little 
Quakers, defeating them in fairly fought 
Jjattles. 

The season opened with Swarthmore 
coaches finding excellent material returned 
from last year's team. With the line posi- 
tions almost entirely filled by former letter- 
men, and with six ball carriers who had al- 
ready earned their letters, hard pressed by five other players who had showed 
up well in the backfield before, Swarthmore prepared for its difficult schedule. 
The Garnet successfully opened the season by snowing under the Washington 
College team 33-0, the same score by which last year's team defeated the Qiester- 
town warriors. The opponents, with exactly the same team as last year with the 
exception of one man, threatened to give Dr. Mercer's aggregation a stiff battle 
throughout the first half. Barnes ran the ball twenty-five yards for the only 
touchdown of tlie period. 

Swarthmore players came back in the second half, however, and swept their 
weaker opponents completely off their feet, Atkinson and McGuire pushing the 
ball over the final marker in the third quarter and McDiarmid and Testwuide 
tallying the last two scores for the home team in the final period. The fine 
work of every one of the thirty-three Swarthmoreans who saw service in this 
game gave promise for the very successful season that followed. 

Swarthmore confidently in- 
vaded Franklin Field to battle 
against the strong Penn team 
the next week, in weather 
almost comparable to that of 
the year before. Despite the 
fact that Penn finished up 
ahead of a 67-0 score, Swarth- 






t**-^^-^ 



[22+] 




y SM " ' -* more did not play a game of which to be ashamed. In all 

they scored seven first downs, more than the combined num- 
ber of Ursinus and F. & M., Penn's opponents of the previous 
^^^^^^^^ two weeks. With the score 55-0 against them, although out- 

Pfl 'J^I^V' .»! classed by a smarter and fresher team, they broke through 
^^ n l W.Ji»« . »i Penn's stone-wall defense to block placements and held for 

three and four downs with their backs against the goal 
posts. 

The only possible chance the Garnet had of scoring came 
in the latter part of the initial half, when two passes netted 
them a total of forty-eight yards, putting the ball on 
Penn's seventeen-yard hne. Swarthmore was penalized and 
Testwuide missed a drop kick by inches, 
On the next play Penn fumbled, and Test- 
wuide recovered on the twelve-yard line. 
Just then the half ended and with it Swarthmore's only 
scoring hopes. 

During the first half of the Susquehanna game, the de- 
morahzing effects of the Penn defeat was apparent. The 
Garnet played a very poor brand of football and the half 
ended with the score of 7-0 against them. In the second 
period, however, the home team was inspired to carry out 
the scoring attack which was the feature of the game. Down 
the field in one of the most varied and powerful drives 
ever seen on the home gridiron, the Garnet swept their 
opponents in front of them, scoring six touchdowns in all Barnes 



Captain-elect 
Haviland 





Hadeler. Brown, Dellmuth. Keefer. Wright. Sunderland. Lipiiineott. Head 

Asst. Coach Ward. Testwniide. Burton. Atkiss, Biddle, Crowl. Hicks, Sinclair 

McDiarmid, Atkinson, Sullivan. Booth, Christian, Haviland, Heward, Wagner 

Coach Mercer, Redman, McLain, Hallowell, Capt. McFeely, McGuire, James, Barnes, 

Mgr. Brown 



^m 



I 225 





to finally defeat the enemy, 
37-7. On Founders' Day the 
team fought an uphill battle 
against their opponents from 
Johns Hopkins, despite the 
fact that they outplayed the 
Baltimore warriors in every 
department except forward 
passing. The game finally 
ended with the Garnet lead- 
ing a 13-9 score, although 
five minutes before found 
them trailing, 9-7. The win- 
ning six points came when 
Sinclair had recovered an enemy fumble, and Hopkins had been penahzed 
two times, putting the ball on the ten-yard line. The final marker was easily 
reached from there, Sinclair having the honor of pushing the pigskin across. 
In this game the work of Atkinson was especially outstanding. That stellar 
fighting back never, throughout the entire game, gave up his slashing, smashing 
_ drives and his hard tackles. On the defense 
his work was superb and on the offense he 
hit the line, circled the ends, and took passes 
for a total of 180 yards. Another Garnet back- 
field power was McDiarmid. Although play- 
only three-quarters of the game, he gained 
the most ground through the line with 110 
yards. He also tallied 25 yards from end 
runs and passes. His defensive play was also 
outstanding. At one time his speed saved a 
touchdown after a Hopkins man had caught 
a pass beyond our last defensive back. 

On November 3 the Garnet met the 
Delaware team on the home field. Al- 
though checked by a wet field they downed 
their weaker opponents by a score of 20-0. 
The playing of both teams was ragged, 
and the number of first downs in the entire 
_^^^^^^^__, game totaled only ten. The slippery field 
{»' ' '■HH^:JL j made aerial attacks ineffective so that both 
teams resorted to straight football. Early 
in the first quarter Testwuide carried the 




ir 




James 



Hallowell 







^> 



McGuire 



ball around right end for 25 yards to the 
opponents' one-yard line, which was fol- 
lowed by Atkinson's tally. Later Atkin- 
son cut through left tackle for a fast 
twenty-five yard run and the second score. 
McDiarmid, during the third period, inter- 




McLain 



^m 



226 ] 



^ 



f*^*? 







r 



cepted a Delaware pass and 
staged a brilliant rvm of 62 
yards for the final tally. With 
a three touchdown lead, the 
varsity almost entirely retired 

stitutes hold the visitors 
scoreless for the remainder of 
the game. 

The team then captured its 
fourth straight decision and 
its fifth triumph of the season 
by sinking the plucky Frank- 
lin and Marshall team by the 
score of 13-0, at Lancaster, on November tenth. Although there were several 
long gains on both sides through an aerial attack, old-fashioned football seemed 
to be in vogue throughout the entire game, interspersed with several punting 
duels in which the Lancasterians seemed to 
have a slight edge. The Garnet's first touch- 
down was a result of two sweeping end runs y,^^ 
by that stellar back Atkinson, who played 
his usual speedy game. After an exchange 
of punts and a rushed kick, which gave 
Swarthmore the ball on enemy's eighteen 
yard line, Atkinson carried the ball over 
to make the first score for the Garnet. 

The final tally came when Redman in- 
tercepted a pass by Johnson on the Blue 
and White twenty-five-yard line, followed 
by a short pass, Redman to Dellmuth, and 
'^""'•^ end run liy Test\\Tiide, and two hard drives 

ofif tackle by McDiarmid for a first down and a touchdown. Testwuide added an 
extra point by making his drop kick good after the touchdown. Both teams 
possessed fast running backs, 
dangerous in all types of play, 
but the superior work of Cap- 
tain McFeely, Keefer, Hallo- 
well, Booth, Christian, Dell- 
muth, Heward, and Haviland 
on the Swarthmore forward 
w^all, swimg the balance of 
thirteen points in favor of 
the Mercer men. 

Although outgained in 
every department of play, the 
Garnet team remembered last 
year's stinging defeat, and 



Heward 



SS 



(«il»*««<R*>r<i'..««r.,,,. 



4t 



^r^f 



[227] 




McDiaiinid 





Panish 



took advantage of all the breaks of the game, to atone for this 
defeat by sinking Ursinus to the tune of thirteen to seven the 
next week at Swarthniore. The visitors offered a good stiff- 
driving offense and a holding defense. 

The first Garnet score came in the second period. After 
Testwuide had run back a punt twenty yards, Hugh Mc- 
Diarmid, slashed and crashed his way, singlehanded, through 
his opponent's sturdy defense for two first downs and a touch- 
down. Following this touchdown, Egge of Ursinus, nearly tied 
the score by seizing a sensational pass 
hurled at him by Hunter. Gviarded by two 
Garnet backs, Egge snatched the pass and 
ran for all he was worth, slowly drawing 
away from the Garnet secondary defense. 
Sinclair slowly gained on him, however, and pulled him down 
on the fifteen-yard line. The Bears were imable to gain these 
fifteen yards to score at that time. 

The net score came after Swarthmore 
had been held for downs. Heward went 
down fast on Atkinson's punt and recov- 
ered the ball on the opponent's one-yard 
line, after Young had been so obliging as to 
touch the ball before it came to the ground. 
Atkinson carried it over the final chalk 
mark on the next play. 

The Collegeville team then scored their 
only touchdown, the Garnet representatives 
having gone into a slump. They advanced 
the ball half the length of the field after 
the kick off to the forty-seven-yard line, 
without losing possession of it, and Young 
finally took it across. Sterner adding the extra point. 

The Rutgers game, on November 24, furnished a rather 
disappointing wind-up to a successful sea- 
son, for in a loosely played game on the 
New Brunswick field, the Red and Black 
took their second successive victory from 
the Garnet in as many years to the tune of 
thirteen to two. The two lone Swarthmore points came on the 
second play of the game when a Rutgers back fumbled, and 
Booth crashed through and tackled him behind the line for a 
safety. For the rest of the quarter, both teams played back 
and forth, neither seeming to have any apparent advantage. 
In the second quarter, however, on a first down, Rutgers 
completed a thirty-yard forward pass, making a first down by 
Wagner ^ small margin, having been penalized fifteen yards for hold- 



Redii 





Sullivan 





Atkiss 



ing. This seemed to discourage the Garnet team, and it coiild 
not seem to drive the hall across the final marker. McDiarmid 
and Atkinson gained the most ground for Swarthmore, while 
Redman starred on the defense. Testwuide and McGuire aher- 
nated at quarter, carrying out much of the 
passing work of the team as well as running 
the plays. 

The first Red and Black score came in 
the second quarter after the sensational 
thirty-yard pass. Greenburg was thrown 
for a loss, but soon afterwards Carney took 
a pass from Irwin for eleven yards, Irwin 
hit centre for six, taking the ball to the two- 
vard line, and Greenburg went through 
center for these two yards on the next play. The other score 
came soon after the opening of the last quarter, when Rosen 
broke through the linefor twenty-one yards. 
Three-line plunges made a first down on 

the four- 
yard stripe, 
and Green- 
burg rush- 
ed through 
the line for 
the second 
louchdowii 
on thenexl 
play. 



Atkinson 



_M 



■■aR^f 





Swarthmore staged a final rally in the last P' 
few minvites of play but it was too late and 
the final whistle found them still trailing 




Bui toil 



a thirteen to two score. 

Since only five men, McFeely, McGuire, Hallo well. James, 
and McLain will be lost by graduation, 
prospects for next year look very good. 
With captain-elect, Haviland, who won this 
honor by his steady and stellar work at 
end, and the seventeen other letter men 
which will be back. Dr. Mercer should be 
able to build up a team which should have 
a season even more successful than the past. 
As we look back upon the past season we 
find that many individual stars were de- 
veloped throughout the year. 

Captain McFeely has led his team successfully through the 
season while himself holding down the post of center. He has 
shown the brand of play for which Swarthmore centers have 



Christian 




Ciowl 





luth 




Keefer 



become famous, playing a devastating game at roving defense, 
in breaking up tbe enemy plunges, and on the offensive his 
accurate passing has been the foundation of every play. His 
hard charging and blocking have opened the way for many 
a gain through center. There has been no more consistent 
player on the team for the last tliree years, and it is fitting 
that his last year should be especially successful. 

A powerful running back, especially adept at reeling off 
a first down through the line, Barnes has won his second letter 
at the halfback post. His weight and 
strength made him especially dangerous on 
oif tackle slants and straight plmiges. 

Playing his third year in a guard posi- 
tion, Hallowell has exceeded his o-vvn pre- 
vious best form this season. His work in the F. and M. game, 
especially on the defense, when he repeatedly broke through 
to toss the rimner for a loss, gives the index 
of liis play in every game. Alert, hard- 
charging, and powerfid, he will be sorely- 
missed next year. 

Another senior to win a letter in the 
quarterback position, James displayed a 
scrapping spirit and fight in his running 
of the team. While being a good field 
general, he is also able at leading the inter- 
ference for a sweep around end or in run- 
ning back a kick. 

Facing stiff competition, McGuire won his 

third letter in the backfield, holding down 

the quarterback post with his veteran skill. 

A heady field general, steady and sure in 

the pinches, as well as being a good plimger, he ran the team 

well at all times. 

Breaking into an end position on the 
team requires unusual skill in considera- 
tion of the brand of competition offered. 
McLain won his first letter at an end post 
by his speed and drive in nailing end runs 
and covering punts. 

Steady, dogged, and powerful line play made Booth one of 
the outstanding finds of the year. Winning his first letter at 
the guard position, he has shown the highest degree of de- 
pendability and alertness. 

Winning his second successive letter at end, Ha-vdland has 

made himself kno^vn as one of the hardest, scrappiest ends 

— ' on the squad. He is at his best on the defensive, frequently 

Ui^li, Ijreaking through the interference to smear enemy runs, and 




h 



Sincla 




Testwuide 



^m 



[230] 



f, 





Manager Brown 



Coach Mercer 



getting down under the kicks to nail his 
man with deadly accuracy. He is short and 
lacks weight, but has never saved himself 
on that account. Next year should he an- 
other great season for him. 

A fit running mate for Haviland, Heward 
also won his second letter at an end post, 
and played much the same sort of game. 
Adept at upsetting interference and diag- 
nosing enemy plays, he is also an able 
. blocker on the offense, and a sweet tackier 
in getting down the field to cover punts. 
He also should have little trouble in re- 
taining his position for another year. 
Missing his letter by the narrowest of margins last year, McDiarmid con- 
clusively proved his worth as a driving halfback during this season. His speed 
and agility serve him equally in sliding off-tackle, slanting around end, or 
crashing through the center. In the F. and M. game he scored the first touchdown 
on two beautiful line plunges from the fifteen yard line. 

Another end who won his first letter, Parrish displayed the same speed and 
agility in his end play that marks his hurdling. Spilling the interference or 
blocking defensive backs are equally easy for him. 

Redman proved to be another find in the backfield. A real triple threat man, 
he can kick, run or pass when the occasion demands, while his defensive play 
in backing up the line is outstanding. In the Rutgers game, he made as many as 
seven tackles in succession, bringing his man down with a sure dive, while in the 
Ursinus game his work in intercepting passes continually saved long enemy gains. 
Sullivan is another tackle who has shown great ability in breaking up enemy 
plays during the season. Winning his letter for the first time, he has given 
promise by his steady and efficient play of repeating next year. 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 

October 6 Washington College at Swarthmore. . . 33 

October 13 U. of P. at Franklin Field 

October 20 Susquehanna at Swarthmore 37 

October 27 Johns Hopkins at Swarthmore 13 

November 3 Delaware at Swarthmore 20 

November 10 F. & M. at Lancaster 13 

November 17 Ursinus at Swarthmore 13 

November 24 Rutgers at New Brunswick 2 

Totals 131 



103 



231 



Soccer 




A PERFECT season's record of eight victories 
and an intercollegiate championship title 
made Swarthmore's 1928 soccer eleven prob- 
ably the most successful that has ever represented 
the Garnet institution. A strong squad made up 
of ten former lettermen and a wealth of substi- 
tute material began practice during the winter 
of 1927 to develop a fighting combination that 
scored four shutout victories, and numbered 
among its defeated opponents such powerful 
teams as Princeton, Temple, Navy, Lehigh and 
Haverford. 

Unusual interest was shown in soccer from the 
first practice of the season. In spite of the fact 
that Captain Tom Moore and "Studie" Miller 
Captain Adelniuii were the only varsity players lost by graduation, 

forty men reported to Coach Dunn, and came 
out regularly during the two months of drilling and playing. The defense 
positions were well taken care of with Captain Adelman at goal, and Seibert 
and Johnson in the fullback berths. These two worked smoothly together, 
turning back enemy attacks almost as soon as they appeared. Johnson's clever 
heading and deadly accurate footwork stamped him as All-American material 
and justly earned the captaincy of the 1929 team. 

H. Coles and Potts, two veteran backs, took charge of the left and center 
halfback positions, constantly pushing the ball up to the line where the for- 
wards could score. Bond, the other regular half, suffered with a knee injury 
during most of the season, so that White and Hammell were left to alternate in 
his place. 

The forward line was the strongest that has worn the Garnet in years. With 
the speedy wing men, McBride and Burr, the hard-fighting Bringhurst and Le- 
Cron at inside right and left, and Rudy, a freshman find, at center forward, it 
was no wonder that the team 
piled up a total of 29 goals 
for the season against 5 for 
the opponents. Rudy was 
the year's high scorer, put- 
ting 11 goals into the net in 
eight games. 

The team gave early prom- 




232 



fr^ 




ise of its future success by journeying to Princeton in the 
initial contest of the year and downing the Tigers, 2-1. The 
Princeton hooters had not met defeat in two years, and 
proved one of the season's most difficult opponents. LeCron 
scored first for Swarthmore in the third period, but this tally 
was soon matched by the home team. An extra period was 
needed before Rudy counted the shot that brought victory 
to the Garnet standards. 

This achievement was followed just two days later by a 
victory over Delaware in the first home contest. The final 
count was 2-0, and although the team plainly showed its 
superiority the rearranged forward line was slow in working 
together and missed several opportunities 
to increase the score. Rudy, who was 
shifted from inside left to the center 
position, scored both goals. 

Against Temple, on October 26, the Garnet again brought 
a two-year winning streak to an end by defeating the city 
hooters 4-2. In this contest Swarthmore's team showed how 
well it was rounding into form. Burr and Rudy scored goals 
in the first half in spite of excellent Temple defense work. 
In the third and fourth quarters LeCron and Rudy both 
found the net for scores. Leaness scored for the visitors in 
the third and last periods. 

The fourth victim was the United States Naval Academy 
team, which fell by a 2-1 score. Once more the soccermen 



Captain-Elett 
Johnson 



iPW 




Burr 




THE 1928 CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM 

Coach Dunn, Lippincott, Coles, Wood, Bringhurst, Johnson, M Coles, Manager Snyder 

McBride, F. White, Le Cron, Captain Adelman, Rudy, Siebert, Potts 



233 




McBride 




Siebert 



invaded enemy territory, and disregarding the unfamiliar 
ground and a rainy afternoon, outplayed their opponents in 
every department of the game. The middies resorted to 
their usual rushing tactics in the opening minutes of play, 
hut were repulsed hy some excellent defense work. Navy 
scored first on a penalty kick from the six-yard mark, which 
was almost impossible to block. Swarthmore continued be- 
hind until the last quarter, when a brilliant corner kick play 
enabled Johnson to head the ball into the net. Not wanting 
a deadlocked game to spoil its record, the 
team began another strong rush which 
ended when LeCron made the second tally 
on a penalty kick. 
The next victim of the fast-moving Garnet machine was the 
Lafayette eleven which was defeated on its ovm field at Easton 
by a 5-1 score. In spite of a bad wind and an unusually small 
playing area the team made itself at home and scored the 
first goal within eight minutes of the opening whistle. Four 
other times the ball was sent spinning into the enemy's net, 
while only one counter slipped through Captain Adelman's 
hands at the Garnet goal. Every one of the Swarthmore for-j 
wards tallied with the exception of McBride, who contribvited 
by booting a corner kick straight to Johnson who sank it for 
a Garnet goal in the second cjuarter. 

The team continued to establish records during the next 
week by turning in two shutout victories within three days. 
On Wednesday, November 14, the weak Franklin and Mar- 
shall hooters were smothered under a total of 10 goals. The 
visitors were unable to put tip any attempt at real opposition 
and the home team did almost as it pleased. The passing, de- 
fense work, and goal shooting were all of the highest quality 
and by playing on the offense almost the entire game the team 
secured valuable training for the two final 
contests. The overwhelming score of 10-0 
was the greatest rout of the season. 

Just three days later, the Lehigh Uni- 
versity soccer ites went the way of all the opponents of the 
Garnet in what was midouhtedly the most thrilling soccer 
game ever played on the Prep school field. The entire first 
half of the contest witnessed scoreless battling of the hardest 
kind. Both teams were pressing on the offense, and in de- 
fending their own goals formed impenetrable walls of 
strength. Neither team showed any decided advantage and 
the game was in doubt for some time after the teams took the 
field for the second half. 
F. White It ^^* the Garnet's superior training and stamina which 



^. 1^ 








urst 



234 



m 



^ 



. f-^-K 



\^. 



'iB*' 



The Team 

made a neat side step and shot the ball into the netting for the 
goal pepped up the players and two more scores were made 
before the game ended. Rudy placed both of these in the net- 
ting, one on a pass from Bringhurst and the other on a short 
driblile after receiving the ball from Burr. Dick Bond, who 
was troubled with an old knee injury all season was badly 
hurt early in the game. His knee was so badly twisted that he 
was kept out of the sport for the rest of the practice season 
and for the Haverford game. 

After defeating the Brown and White 
team for its seventh consecutive victory, 
the Garnet men under Coach Dunn pointed 
everything toward conquering Haverford 
in the season's final. With the omission of 
the traditional Thanksgiving Day football 
came between the tAvo rivals the student 
bodies of both schools looked forward to 
the soccer contest to prove their superiority 
in fall sports. Before this game, a Scarlet 
and Black soccer team had never been de- 
feated by a Swarthmore eleven, and the 
Main Liners were eager to keep their record 
intact. The Swarthmore men were just as 
eager to finish up a successful season by 
accomplishing what some had thought impossible. 

A large crowd was on hand to watch the game get away to 
a fast start and continue without lessening the pace through- 
out the two forty -minute halves. In the first period the Swarth- 
more hooters had a sHght edge over their opponents and with 
the wind at their backs kept the ball almost entirely in enemy 



won out final- 
ly. The first 
break in the 
scoreless tie 
came diu-ing 
the third quar- 
ter when Burr 
received a long 
kick from 
J ohnson and 
dribbled down 
toward the 
goal. When the 
Bethlehem 
goalie ran out 
to Stop the at- 
t a c k. Burr 
first tally. This 



f. 



■^t-'\ 



Hammell 






H. Coles 



1 



Le Cron 



235" 





Bond 



territory. Only on one occasion was Adelman given any seri- 
ous trouble, and at that time he cleared his territory cleverly 
by long throws to the center of the field. 

Early in the first quarter Lou Bringhurst made a name for 
himself by sinking the only goal of the game. The goal was 
made possible after a corner kick by McBride which was re- 
ceived by LeCron and passed to Coles who shot for the net. 
Just as Alsop, the Scarlet and Black goal tender, made a lunge 
for the ball, which was a bit wide, Bringhurst made a quick 
kick and shot the sphere into the far corner of the goal. Dur- 
ing the remainder of the game neither team was able to score. 
Haverford was unable to match this lead in spite of 
desperate efforts. The Main Liners kept on the offensive dur- 
ing the majority of the time remaining, but were successfully 
held off by the Swarthmore defense. Adelman was constantly being threatened 
but was able to stop every hostile shot toward the goal. Johnson and Seibert 
worked together excellently, turning back each enemy attack 
as it appeared. In the closing minutes of play McBride in- 
jured his leg but remained in the play, so that the varsity team 
played the entire contest without substitution. 

With the scalp of Haverford as its eighth trophy of the year, 
the team was rated as champions of the southern district of 
the intercollegiate league. Yale, the northern champions, were 
officially granted the championship of the east, having played 
more games than the Swarthmore eleven. However, the Garnet 
was the only team that went through the season with neither 
a defeat nor a tie in both league and outside league games. 

Individually this year's soccer team has been the strongest 
aggregation that has ever worn the Garnet colors. Coach 
Robert Dunn's problem has been one of coordinating his 
players, rather than developing individual men. 

Captain C. Bertram Adelman, our stellar goaUe of four years' varsity training, 

has been the backbone of the team throughout the season. Adelman, besides 

making several spectacular '"saves," and consistently punting 

the ball half the length of the field and more, has furnished 

much of the necessary "pep" that wins games. 

As mainstays of the defense, Howard Johnson and Walter 
Seibert deserve much credit for the success of the 1928 season. 
Johnson, who was mentioned for last year's Olympic team, 
may be named for the 1928 AU-American team. His partner 
fullback is a dogged, hard fighting player with a sti-ong right 
foot. 

Henry Coles and William Potts, for the second season, cov- 
ered left and center half, their heady defense work and good 
support of the forward line featuring their playing through- 
out. Richard Bond, who regularly would have filled out the 
jj^j halfback line, was injured early in the season and was able to 




Potts 




236] 






play only for short periods in four games. 
Bertram Hammell and Fisher White alter- 
nated at his post. Hammell's meteoric rise 
from novice to varsity player was one of 
the sensations of the season. 

Coach Dunn's problem on the forward 
line was how most effectively to line up 
five hard shooting, accurately passing play- | 
ers. Henry Rudy was finally decided upon 
for the center position. Louis Bringhurst 
and John LeCron played with him in the 
circle. Bringhurst is known as a consistent 
Coach Dunn ^^nd hard player, while LeCron and Rudy 

are the deceptive players of the trio. 
James Burr and John McBride completed the forward line. Both men have the 
speed plus the clever footwork that go to make up high calibre wing men. 



I 



Snyder, Mgr. 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 

October 10 Princeton at Princeton 2 

October 12 Delaware at Swarthmore 2 

October 26 Temple at Swarthmore 4 

November 3 Navy at Annapolis 2 

November 9 Lafayette at Easton 5 

November 14 Franklin and Marshall at Swarthmore 10 

November 17 Lehigh at Swarthmore 3 

November 23 Haverford at Haverford 1 



29 



237 




Pasfktball 





A" 



Captain McDiarmid 



N AUSPICIOUS start of three consecutive 
victories promised a banner record for 
1929, only to be followed by a mid-season 
slump, from the effects of which the team 
never fully recovered. The high points of 
the season, in which Coach Larkin's proteges 
turned in six wins and as many losses, were 
the brilliant victory over Lehigh and the 
splendid showing made against Pennsyl- 
vania's Intercollegiate League leaders. An 
inglorious defeat by Haverford, due partly to 
the enforced absence of Captain McDiarmid, 
closed a season which, though hardly excep- 
tional, was still a decided improvement over 
the previous year. Playing was erratic from 
game to game, and the frequent flashes of 
brilliance exhibited by Swarthmore's court- 
men could not be turned into much-needed points. Throughout the season the 
defense work was excellent, ^veakness in shooting and inability to get started 
during the early part of the game contributing largely to the losses. 

Individually the quintet turned in an excellent record. Testwuide, at forward 
position, played a fast, heady game all season, and with his brilliant offensive 
work was a continual menace to his opponent's basket. He 
netted a total of 79 points, second only to Captain McDiarmid, 
who was high scorer for the season. McDiarmid's consistently 
good long-range shots clinched more than one game for the 
Garnet. A pair of forwards of the calibre of these two players 
was sufficient to keep any opposing team on its toes. Howard 
Johnson was a stellar performer at center position throughout 
the season; his jumping ability and accurate placing earned 
Swarthmore many points. In addition he sank the two foul 
goals that clinched the thrilling victory over Lehigh. In Burr 
and Dellmuth Coach Larkin found an excellent pair of 
guards. The former not only played an airtight defensive 
game, but also managed to place third in the scoring list; 
while Dellmuth's dependable playing, coupled with his good 




humor and cool-headed steadiness preserved the team's morale 



Captain-Elect 
Dellmuth 





in one tight pinch after another. He was chosen captain for 
the 1930 season. Sharpies and Redman, as substitute center 
and guard, played consistently rather than spectacularly, and 
proved to be of first team quality. 

The opening victory over the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy was marked by well-balanced, rather than by in- 
dividually brilHant playing. The score, 32-26, did not indicate 
an outstanding triumph, but rather gave promise of a good 
season. In this game Winde was forced out with an unfortunate 
knee injury, and his services were lost to the team for the 
remainder of the year. The following week Lehigh was de- 
feated 43-40 in a thrilling contest in the Hall Gymnasium. 
Entering the game but half-expectant of 
victory, the Swarthmore quintet was out- 
scored 18-12 at half time. Accurate passing and shooting in 
the second half brought the count to 39-40, when Johnson 
dropped two fouls into the basket to put the Garnet in the 
lead. Testwuide clinched the victory in the last minute of play 
with an uncanny shot from the middle of the floor, bringing 
the total to 43-40. The victory was all the sweeter, since Lehigh 
came here with an enviable reputation, bringing with them 
their star forward. Many, who took second place in the Inter- 
collegiate League scoring honors. Although Testwuide was 
high scorer, the coordination of play in this game was as good 
as that exhibited by the Garnet throughout the season. 

Drexel was defeated 30-20, after McDiarmid had won the Thomas Shnrples 



James Burr 








Parrish Dellmuth Leigh Redman Michener Manager Seibert 
Testwuide Burr Captain McDiarmid Sharpies Johnson 





Johnson 



game with his four field goals in the second half. A 26-33 de- 
feat by Rutgers was due primarily to the fact that Swarthmore 
was imable to get started until well into the first half. The 
visitors, plaving a fast, rough game, got off to a good start and 
were never headed. Captain McDiarmid was high scorer 
in this game with a total of eleven points. A hollow victory 
over P. M. C, 25-32, was marked by loose playing and poor 
shooting, although the smallness of the lead kept the specta- 
tors on edge. The quintet was defeated, 16-19, in an extra 
period fray with Delaware; here again poor shooting was 
responsible for Swarthmore"s low score. 

The brilliant stand made against Pennsylvania proved the 
worth of the Garnet team. Behind 14-7 at half time. Penn's 
coach wa- forced to put in his first string men, in order to 
barely win the contest in the last two minutes, 20-16. Swarthmore's superb 
defense kept their opponents' scoring aces well in check: Schaaf was held to 
one field goal and three fouh by Burr and later Redman. McDiarmid and 

Testwuide divided scoring honors, but the whole team earned 

the admiration of the college by their splendid playing. 

After the Penn game the team could not hit their stride, 
and were badly beaten by St. John's College. Good defensive 
and offensive plaving on the part of the opposition won the 
game. On the other hand, Ursinus was defeated, 36-27, and 
the three-game losing streak broken. Excellent guarding and 
improved passing and shooting were too much for the Bears. 
The loss to Dickinson was expected, on account of that teams 
excellent showing against Penn, Princeton, and Army. Captain 
McDiarmid's playing featured the game; he w^as high scorer 
with 16 points, and led the Garnet rally in the second half. 
Susquehanna was downed 33-20 the day after the Dickinson 
game. Poor shooting prevented a higher score; in the second 
half a good deal of roughness resiJted in the removal of two Swarthmore and 
four Susquehanna plavers. 

The season closed with a loss to Haverford in Penn's 
Palestra. The absence of Captain McDiarmid had its effect 
on the Garnet morale; the defeat was due to poor performance 
rather than to outstanding playing by Haverford, who were 
not favored to win. Weakness in foul shooting lost valuable 
points for Swarthmore. Almost the entire game was mediocre ; 
there was little fight to the Garnet offense except for a brief 
period in the second half, when goals by Redman and Test- 
wuide advanced us to within three points of the lead and 
brought a thrill to Swarthmore supporters. 

The quintet will lose onlv two lettermen by graduation. 

Burr's steady playing at guard will be keenly missed, as well 

as Sharpies' work at center; but five veteran stars remain to 

Testwiiide form a team for next year that should need little seasoning to 




. Redman 




[240] 




bring it into top form. The present junior 
varsity and freshman squads came through 
their schedules with a record of only two 
defeats. These combinations offer plenty of 
promising material which needs only ex- 
perience to be of first team calibre. A 
strong varsity aggregation, under the sea- 
soned leadership of Captain Dellmuth, and 
backed by a promising second team, points 
to a highly successful cage season for 1930. 




Wr^ 



Coach Larkin 



Manaaer Seibert 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

Jan. 5 — Phila. College of Pharmacy, at Swarthmore.... 32 26 

Jan. 12 — Lehigh at Swarthmore 43 40 

Jan. 19 — Drexel at Swarthmore 30 20 

Feb. 2 — Rutgers at Swarthmore 26 33 

Feb. 8— P. M. C. at Swarthmore 25 22 

Feb. 9 — Delaware at Newark 16 19 

Feb. 13— U. of P. at Philadelphia 16 20 

Feb. 15 — St. John's at Annapolis 24 45 

Feb. 18 — LTrsinus at Collegeville 36 27 

Feb. 22 — Dickinson at Carlisle 28 40 

Feb. 23 — Susquehanna at Selinsgrove 33 20 

Mar. 2— Haverford at Penn 19 27 



328 



339 






pasieball 



■in 




ALTHOUGH suffering seven defeats during 
the season, the Swarthmore baseball 
season can be considered more than 
successful by virtue of a thrilling victory over 
Haverford. This contest was undoubtedly 
the most exciting and interesting of the year, 
for it was in this game that the Garnet 
showed a true fighting spirit to come from 
behind and rally in the sixth and eighth 
innings to turn seeming defeat into a glorious 
victory. 

Playing such opponents as Army, Prince- 
ton, Rutgers, Navy and Lehigh, the Garnet 
found that its biggest handicap was its inex- 

'^ ' " — ■ ' " perienced pitching staff. McFeely was the 

Captain McCook only veteran hurler on the staff, while Cook- 

enbach and Burton, freshmen aces, were the 
only other moundsmen upon whom Coach Dunn could call. This weakness, 
coupled with loose fielding, resulted in several large scores being amassed by 
opponents. Princeton and Rutgers were the least merciful of these. 

In the catching position, Redman proved to be an able successor to Pete 
Richards. As an understudy he had Frank Christian, a freshman with some 
experience, from George School. Johnson, at first base, was a veteran of last 
year, while Captain McCook at second base, and McGuire at short stop, were 
the other two veterans of the infield. Tipping, a hurler and infielder of the 
previous season, was used at third base, alternating with Dellmuth, freshman 
three-letter man. 

The season opened with a 9-0 victory over Osteopathy College of Phila- 
delphia. Playing with the temperature hovering aljout the freezing mark the 
Garnet sluggers scored three runs in the first inning and five more in the 
second, when Captain Mc- 
Cook hit a home run with the 
bases crowded and Barnes, 
following, duplicated his feat. 
St. Johns of Annapolis, 
was overwhelmingly defeated 
16-4 on the following week 
when Coach Dunn's heavy- 





hitting outfield unleashed some unmerciful extra-base blows 
in the early innings to compile a comfortable lead. McFeely 
pitched the first six innings, being followed by Burton, who 

riiiiitoiL- Sli ^^^ "°* ^^^"^ * ^^^ ^°^ ^^^ remainder of the game. 
J5^:^A-i!H* The first defeat of the season was administered by Stevens 

Institute of Technology 5-2 on the following Saturday in an 
eleven-inning game. Three hits and a squeeze play in the 
eleventh proved to be the instruments of victory for the 
Stevens team. In this game Cookenbach started his first 
collegiate contest as a pitcher, and had he been given better 
support would have won out in the regulation nine innings. 
Two more defeats followed in quick succession at the 
hands of Ursinus and Navy. Heavy hitting 
on the part of the Naval Academy boys 
proved to be the downfall of the Garnet ^ts.^ 

Ursinus took a distinct hking to the offer- •( ^ 

ings of the Swarthmore hurling staff and pounded out a 17-6 , 
victory. The only bright spot of this game was Sinclair's 
home run in the sixth inning. 

Irked by these defeats the team broke its losing streak 
with a vengeance on the following week when it overwhelmed 
Franklin and Marshall by a score of 14-7. In this game the 
Garnet jumped off to a 5-0 lead never to be headed. Dell- 
muth's homer was an added attraction of this game. 

Tliis victory was followed by two defeats at the hands of 
Drexel and Army respectively. Inability to solve the offerings 



Captain-Elect 
Adelmaii 



in a 10-3 count. 





THE TEAM 
Coach Dunn, Barnes, Burton, Tipping, Cookenback, Burr, Delbnuth, Manager Colket 
W. McFeely, Redman, Sinclair, Captain McCook, Adelman, McGuire, Johnson 



[243 1 




-4-%: 



Barnes 



of Drexel's young hiirler proved to be the cause of the Drexel 
victory. Against the West Pointers the Garnet put up one 
of the best performances of the season, but succumbed 7-3. 
Barnes and Adelman hit home runs in this game, but their 
efforts proved fruitless to the outcome. 

The following week Haverford was sent down to defeat, 
7-6, by the Garnet batsmen who rallied in the sixth and eighth 
innings to score seven runs and overcome the six to nothing 
lead that Haverford had piled up behind the pitching of Sup- 
plee, the star Red and Black twirler. McFeely, who started 
the game, proved incompetent and Haverford batted him 
from the mound in the last half of the fourth inning. By that 
time they had scored six runs and inasmuch as Swarthmore 
had not managed to gain a run in that time, it looked as if 
the lead would last. Cookenback, freshman pitcher, took up the task where 
McFeely had left off and held the Main-liners scoreless for the last five frames. 
In the sixth inning Swarthmore stepped out and scored four 
runs, the first two of which came as a result of hits by Adel- 
man, McCook, Barnes, and Dellmuth. Then with two men on 
base, Redman, Garnet catcher, smashed one to right field and 
brought in two more runs. In the eigth inning it was Redman 
who started the scoring again with a single, Cookenback soon 
came through with a double to left field, and although Burr 
was thrown out at first, Johnson hit another double along the 
left field foul line scoring two men. He crossed the plate him- 
self a moment later on an error by Tripp, the Haverford short- 
stop. In the last inning Haverford succeeded in getting two 
men on base but Richter struck out, thus ending the game 
with the score still 7-6 in favor of the Garnet. 

After this game the team suffered a relapse and lost to Le- 
high by a score of 7-3. Lehigh won, taking advantage of all 
the hits which Burton allowed them, ten in numlDer, while Swarthmore was only 
able to collect three runs from a total of thirteen hits. Burton went the whole 
distance on the mound and turned in a good performance ex- 
cept for the fact that he was unable to prevent Lehigh from 
bunching their hits. 

On May 16 the last victory of the season, an 8-3 triumph, 
was scored over the Susquehanna team from Selinsgrove. 
McFeely turned in one of the best pitched games of the year, 
allowing our opponents only five hits. Swarthmore got off to 
a flying start when three runs were scored in the first inning; 
Johnson and Adelman singled and Redman batted out a home 
run which scored the other two ahead of him. The team 
played good ball all through the game and assisted by the 
pitching of McFeely showed what they could do when they 
were going at their best. 
ju, ,,, ■ The Garnet was swamped in its next contest by the Orange 




McFeely 





Johnson 




and Black of Princeton to the tune of 21-0. Swarthmore was 
only able to collect six hits from the opposing pitcher, while 
the ball players of "Old Nassau" pounded the offerings of the 
Swarthmore pitchers at will, scoring eleven runs in the first 
four innings and nine in the last three. 

The team lost the final game of the season, the annual 
Alumni Day game to a powerful Rutgers nine which batted 
out twenty hits before the eyes of a large crowd of loyal but 
disheartened Swarthmore rooters. Neither team scored in the 
first inning, but in the second Rutgers pushed five runs across 
the plate to establish a lead that was never overcome. Two 
more runs were added in the third, and it was in this same 
inning that the Garnet made her most powerful bid for victory 
by scoring five runs before Rutgers had a chance to catch her 
breath. Singles by Adelman, McCook, McGuire, and a home run by Dellmuth 
contributed to the scoring as did several costly errors on the part of Rutgers. The 
Garnet, however, was unable to keep up the good work and 
scored only once more, when Redman came in with what 
proved to be the last Swarthmore run of the 1928 season. He 
scored on a combination of a walk, a single by Adelman and an 
error. Rutgers continued to score in the next three innings, 
the fifth, sixth, and seventh. In the seventh Burton was sent 
in to relieve Cookenback who had started the game. Burton 
did a fine job of relief pitching holding the Rutgers team 
scoreless for the last two frames but it was useless as Swarth- 
more was unable to decrease, let alone overcome, the Rutgers 
lead. It was a poor game from the standpoint of the home team 
and showed the Swarthmore nine at its worst, for the Garnet 
played a sloppy game all the way through, making a total of 
eight errors and leaving fourteen men on base. 

Throughout the season the lack of consistent pitching was 
the noticeable weakness. MeFeely, Burton and Cookenback all turned in sterling 
performances during the season, but none of these men were consistent winners. 
The hitting and fielding ability of the team was on a high 
average but the inability to hit in the pinches when hits meant 
runs caused us to lose more than one ball game to teams which 
were in reality inferior to ours. The prospects for the 1929 
season are bright with only two letter men gone from the 
squad, and several promising Freshman prospects, who are 
expected to show up well. 

Individually, Coach Dunn developed many players who 
may be depended upon for good and consistent performances 
next year. Captain McCook, the only letterman to graduate, 
has been a good leader of the team and has turned in con- 
sistently good performances in the field and at the bat. He is 
a good and dependable hitter, and has often helped out the 
Tipping team in a pinch. 



1 1 


-'- -c 



Redr 




fl 




Burton 




The infield has been good this season, although it did not 
have enough support from the pitchers' box at many times 
to turn the trick and insure victory for the Garnet team. 
Howard Johnson, a sophomore, has held down the pivotal 
first base position with skill and dependability and has also 
been a steady hitter throughout the season. McGuire at short- 
stop has shown the benefit of three years of experience in a 
Garnet uniform, and may be expected to turn in an even 
better seasonal record in his final year on the Swarthmore 
team. Ralph Tipping, a sophomore who did some pitching 
during his first year at Swarthmore, was 
moved to third base, where he played a 
steady, dependable game. He was assisted 
by Dellmuth, a freshman, who not only 
played well in the field, but showed promise as a coming 
hitter. The vacancy at third base was left by Adelman, who 
was moved from his position of two years' standing to fill the 
vacancy left by Roy Baum at center field. 

Robert Redman, a sophomore, who had been an under- 
study of Pete Richards during his freshman year, took the 
position behind the bat throughout the season. As catcher 
he was steady and dependable, upholding his part of the 
game throughout the season. It was in the 
batting order that he developed most 
promisingly. Toward the end of the season, 
especially in the Haverford, Susquehanna and Alumni Day 
games, Swarthmore discovered that they had a real hitter 
in Redman. 

Bertram Adelman, captain-elect for the 1929 season, has 
played on the Garnet nine for four years, two in the infield and 
the last two in the center field position. As a hitter he has 
been a mountain of power of the Garnet offense, while his 
work in the field has been sure and dependable. Adelman 
should prove himself an able leader of the 
1929 team, as well as a consistent player. 
Curtis Barnes, James Burr, and Petriken 
completed the hard-hitting outfield, which 
has been responsible for many of the runs during the past 
season. Although Petriken was unable to play in enough games 
during his senior year to win another letter he was able to 
show that he had by no means lost any of the power or ability 
which assured him a position in former years. A steady fielder 
and a good hitter, his playing will be missed when the 1929 
team appears in uniform on the playing field. Curtis Barnes 
has been a heavy hitter throughout the year, driving in many 
runs with his powerful smashes to the field. He has also 
proven himself to be somewhat of a home run king, netting Sinclair 



Cookenback 




Dellmuth 




\ \ ) ) 



246] 



ff^ 




several circuit clouts during the year. James 
Burr completes the trio of outfield hitters, 
and has shown the same brand of ball 
which has made him known in previou? 
seasons. A sure hitter, he has often brought 
in runs in the pinches, while as a fielder he 
has an enviable record. Daniel Sinclair, a 
freshman, has done some field work dur- 
ing the season and has shown signs of de- 
veloping into an able outfielder. Another 
freshman who has shown signs of develop- 
ing into a dependable Garnet player is 
Frank Christian, a substitute catcher dur- 
ing the season. Although Redman has held 
down this position regularly throughout the year. Christian has had several 
chances during the season to display a good and consistent brand of baseball, and 
to give promise of developing into a dependable Garnet player in after years. 

With this veteran material to work with. Coach Dunn may be expected to 
develop a baseball team which will raise the standards of this sport during the 
next year, and to complete a difficult schedule with more than ordinary success. 



Coach Dunn 




Manager Colket 



April 


11 


April 


14 


April 20 


April 


21 


April 


25 


April 


28 


April 


30 


May 


2 


May 


5 


May 


9 


May 


12 


May 


16 


May 


18 


May 


19 


May 


23 


Jime 


2 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

(Baseball) 

Swarthmore Opponents 

Osteopathy at Swarthmore 9 

Penn at Philadelphia Game Called 

St. John's at Swarthmore 16 4 

Stevens at Swarthmore 2 5 

Navy at Annapolis 3 10 

Delaware at Swarthmore Game Called 

Ursinus at Collegeville 6 17 

F. & M. at Swarthmore 14 7 

Drexel at Philadelphia 5 

Army at West Point 3 7 

Haverford at Swarthmore 7 6 

Lehigh at Bethlehem 3 7 

Susquehanna at Swarthmore 8 3 

Muhlenberg at Allentown Game Called 

Princeton at Princeton 21 

Rutgers at Swarthmore 6 18 



77 



110 



247 ] 




Xacrosisie 




Captain Bishop 



THE 1928 Lacrosse season was the most 
successful one Swarthniore has had in 
the last three years. Winning six out of 
eight games played, the Garnet stickmen lost 
only to Johns Hopkins and Army, hoth of 
which teams were of Olympic calihre. Under 
the coaching of Thomas Strobahr, former 
Hopkins All American, and the leadership of 
Captain Ellis G. Bishop, a strong machine 
was developed which succeeded in defeating 
such teams as Pennsylvania, Penn State and 
Lafayette. 

Owing to a last-minute change in schedule, 
the Garnet stickmen were forced to meet the 
strong Army outfit as their first opponents. 
The West Point twelve, with an almost per- 
fect attack and an airtight defense, held the 
upper hand of the battle dviring the entire game. Chiefly on account of inex- 
perience and inability to coordinate individual play, but fighting gamely against 
a superior organization. Coach Strobhar's men were unable to overcome the big 
lead that Army piled up during the early part of the game. The best efforts of 
the Garnet attack were continually thwarted bv the cadet defense, while the 
accurate shots of Captain Harry Wilson and his teammates consistently found 
their mark. The last part of the half saw a Swarthmore rally, Thomsen and 
Heward each lodging one in the net. while their compatriot stiffened against the 
West Point attack. In the second half the cadets uncovered an even better style of 
play, led by the clever stickwork and passing of Wilson and Draper. Douglas 
provided a thrill for spectators when he got the ball, carried it up the field, and 
took advantage of an opening made by Heward and Haviland to drop a long shot 
in the net for the first Garnet tally of the half. Encouraged by this rally, the 
Garnet defense stiffened, only 
to crack again when Ferris 
Thomsen was injured. Spirit- 
ed play by the attack netted 
another goal. A final counter 
by Haviland closed the con- 
test, with Swarthmore on the 
short end of an 18-6 score. 




248 




-'""'ISS^ 



--^ ^••j . g dy 




Thomsen and Captain Bishop were outstanding in the Garnet 
defense, while McVaugh received his baptism of fire as goal- 
tender. 

On the following Saturday the Garnet twelve traveled to 
Hoboken to avenge their defeat of the week before at the 
hands of Stevens Institute of Technology. Two goals by the 
engineers in the first few minutes of play presaged another 
dark day for Swarthmore, but soon Bush netted the Quaker's 
first tally, while his teammates tightened their defense and 
kept the attack continually in enemy territory. After several 
minutes of play, Thomsen and Haviland each scored, bring- 
ing the score to 3-2, where it stood when the half-time whistle 
blew. The second half saw one more Stevens 
score to two Garnet tallies. The game, ^_ 

rather loosely played on the whole, ended 
at 5-3. The defense, noticeably weak in the Army game, was 
materially strengthened by putting Hallowell at point and 
moving Russell to first defense. 

The third game of the season was staged on the home field 
with St. Stevens, and resulted in a 17-0 victory for Swarthmore. 
The game was played in a driving rain, which made smooth 
passing difficult, but the Garnet stickmen clearly outclassed 
their opponents, driving ball after ball into the goal. Co- •* 

operation and clever stickwork was displayed by all the 
Swarthmore team, but the best work was done by Thomsen, " " 

who netted 8 goals, and Reward, with 4. „ 

'^ Bus 



Captain-Elect 
Sharpies 





^ 






THE TEAM 

Manager Widing, Haviland, HaUowell, Douglas, McVaugh, Sharpies, Boone, Passmore, Bishop, 

Wagner, Bush, Thomsen, Heward, E. McFeely, Gould, Russell, Wright, Miller 



249 1 




MrFeely 




Hallowell 




Bishop 



On May 5 Swarthniore tasted her second 
and last defeat of the season by a score of 
17-4 at the hands of the Johns Hopkins 
lacrosse team. The Garnet attack gave the 
home team an early lead, keeping the ball 
continually in enemy territory and shoot- 
ing again and again at the goal. Two goals 
by Hopkins were followed by a strong 
Swarthmore attack which netted two coun- 
ters. The Baltimore team hit their stride, 
however, and bombarded the net to close 
the half at 9-3. In the second half the Gar- 
net defense could do little to stop the pass- 
ing and shooting of their opponents. When 
the final whistle blew the score stood 17-4 
with Swarthniore on the short end. Captain 
Bishop's game was outstanding, while 
Heward and Thomsen also merited praise. 

The defeat at the hands of Hopkins was 
avenged by a 9-5 victory over Pennsylvania. 
A soggy field slowed up the game, which 
was loosely played throughout. Swarth- 
more outplayed her rivals in the first pe- 
riod, leaving the score at half 8-0. Ineffec- 
tive defense made Penn an easy target for 
Captain Bishop and his teammates. During 
the first half the Penn attack rarely threat- 
ened the Garnet goal, while Thomsen, 
Heward, Haviland, and Passmore continu- 
ally broke through the opposing defense to 
net 8 counters. During the second half the 
Swarthmore defense weakened, and a hard 
Pennsylvania attack brought the score to 
8-4. The Red and Blue was allowed only 
one more goal, while Heward broke 
through to hang up the Garnet's final tally. 
The little Quakers played an excellent 
game in the first half, but weakened in the 
second. Thomsen and Russell were the 
most outstanding Garnet men, the former 
scoring four of the nine goals. 

Penn State was the next victim of the 
boys in Garnet, falling before a score of 
8-5. The play was fast from start to finish, 
both teams exhibiting good passing and ex- 
cellent teamwork. Swarthmore's airtight 
defense in the first period confined the 




?^ 



Mille 





Gould 



^m 



[250] 





Haviland 




Heward 




Nittany men to one goal, while the Garnet piled up a substan- 
tial lead. The work of Russell in holding Belfield, captain 
and star of the Penn State team, scoreless, was the high light 
of the game. Thomsen and Bishop, as usual, divided scoring 
honors with three goals apiece, while Haviland and Bush each 
tallied one counter. 

The last intercollegiate game of the season was with La- 
Fayette,in which Coach Strohbar's twelve completely swamped 
their rivals 17-3. In spite of the absence of Captain Bishop 
and Bush, the team exhibited good form 
and teamwork. Lack of experience in han- 
dling the ball weakened both the Leopard's 
defense and offense, while clever stick- and 
foot-work enabled Swarthmore to pile up 
seventeen goals. The cleat-equipped Garnet men were also 
at an advantage on the wet field. Thomsen was easily the out- 
standing star of the game, his accurate 
shooting netting him fourteen of the seven- 
teen goals. 

On Commencement Day the team played 
a post-season game with the Alumni on the 
front campus. The game was well-played 
and interesting throughout, both teams be- 
ing almost evenly matched. The first half 
was closely played, but in the second pe- 
riod Thomsen, Captain Bishop and Hew- 
ard raised the undergraduate goals to 9, 
holding the Alumni to 3, where the score 
remained until the end of the game. 

Losing only to the two highest rating 
teams in the country speaks well of the 
tutelage of Coach Strohbar and the fighting spirit of the men. 
Throughout the season the consistent good work of Thom3en, 
Captain Bishop, Heward, Haviland and 
Sharpies, was largely responsible for the 
good showing of the team. Thomsen is es- 
pecially deserving of credit for netting 34 
of the total 69 points scored during the 
season, thus making him the record lacrosse high point man 
of Swarthmore. 

The team will feel greatly the loss of Captain Bishop who 
has been a good field captain as well as a consistent scorer and 
offense man. Bush and McFeely will also be lost by gi-adua- 
tion and Thomsen by transferring to another college. Thirteen 
lettermen will be back, however, including Captain-elect 
Sharpies, Haviland, Bishop, Douglas, Passmore, Wagner and 
McVaugh, who will be the nucleus of a team which promises Sullivan 



?i 







>"^t- 



Passmore 



, i^J":^ 



Russell 




251 ] 



f/ 




Thomsen 





Wagner 



well for another successful season in 1929. 

Since Coach Strobah was faced with a difficult task in shap- 
ing up an almost inexperienced team, there were few individ- 
ual stars last season, although most of the letter winners 
showed themselves worthy wearers of the Garnet. The attack 
this year was somewhat stronger than the defense, account- 
ing for the large scores amassed in all the games, even when 
the defense was unable to stem the powerful onslaughts of 
superior teams. On the attack the individual high point scorer 
was Ferris Thompson, a sophomore, who 
netted many points during the season, and 
whose absence next year will be keenly felt. 
He was ably seconded by Bush and Bishop, 
in home and first attack, who not only were 
responsible for many scores themselves, but who, by their 
excellent teamwork and passing, were able to get the ball into 
strategic positions before the net. Reward 
and Haviland were the other two regular 
attack men, and will form the nucleus about 
which the 1929 attack will be built. They 
have been moved up to the home positions 
for the coming season, and promise to fill 
the vacancies creditably. Robert Bishop, 
brother of Captain Ellis Bishop, Halbert 
Douglas, and Edward Passmore, substitute 
attack men during the 1928 season, may be 
expected to fill the attack positions this 
year. 

At center Wagner may be expected to 
duplicate and even better his last season's 
Wright record, while the defense will also have 

the advantage of having veterans of at least one year's experi- 
ence to stand them in good stead in 1929. Captain-elect 
Sharpies, Russell, who turned in excep- 
tional performances several times during 
the past season, and Joseph Sullivan, a 
steady and dependable player, will fill the 
defense positions this year, while Hallowell 
may be expected to display his old fighting game at the point 
position. The vacancy left by Edward McFeely at cover point 
will be filled by Thomas Keefer, a promising beginner, while 
McVaugh will undoubtedly return to his old post at the goal. 
McVaugh turned out to be a steady and valuable player, de- 
veloping as the season progressed, and, although his early 
work was not so promising, he may be expected to develop 
into a skillful goalie during the coming season. Wright and 
McVaugh Gould, two substitute players who won letters during the past 





Douglas 



^'li/i. 



i i ) ) \ 



252 





season, will back up the team this year, 
Wright on the attack and Gould on the 
defense. Many freshman candidates have 
reported, and, although most of them have 
had little or no experience, they may be 
expected to develop into coming lacrosse 
players in future years. Altogether, the 
Garnet has plenty of material from which 
to develop a good lacrosse team in 1929. 




Coach Strohbar 



Manager Widing 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

April 14 Army at Swarthmore 6 18 

April 21 Stevens at Hoboken 5 3 

April 27 St. Stevens at Swarthmore 17 

May 5 Johns Hopkins at Swarthmore 4 17 

May 9 Pennsylvania at Swarthmore 9 5 

May 12 Penn State at Penn State 8 5 

May 19 Lafayette at Easton 17 3 




^racfe 




T 



Captain Dutton 



|HE Swarthmore College track team en- 
joyed a very successful season in 1928 — 
winning three out of four meets, win- 
ning the Penn Relay event, placing in the 
Middle Atlantics and the Cambridge Inter- 
collegiates — a record well worthy of praise. 
During the season two college records were 
broken, and one tied. Baker, veteran weights 
man and high scorer of the season, smashed 
the discixs record when he heaved a one 
hundred and forty-four foot, one inch throw; 
while Parrish, holder of the Freshman record 
for the two-twenty-yard low hurdles, lowered 
the college record in that same event, when 
he was clocked at twenty-five and one-fifth 
seconds. The former record of twenty-five 
and two-fifths seconds, made by Eberle and 
duplicated by Gowdy, has been standing for seventeen years. Captain Dutton, 
although severely handicapped during the spring by injuries, tied the college 
record for the hundred by sprinting the century in nine and four-fifths seconds. 
The Garnet opened the season on April 14 with an overwhelming victory 
over Delaware and Drexel in a triangular meet, amassing eighty-four points to 
twenty-one and a half and 
twenty and a half for their 
respective opponents. In 
spite of a wet and soggy field, 
and the absence of Captain 
Dutton in the sprints, the 
Quakers were never threat- 
ened. Baker's victories in the 
weight events and the javelin, 
Alden's conquests of the hun- 
dred-yard dash and quarter 
mile, Parrish's win in the 
high and low hurdles, Til- 
ton's first place in the high 
jump in his initial appear- 
ance on the Garnet team, and Alden ■Winniut; llie Ouarler Mile ill the Haverl'ord Meet 





254] 




the distance wins of Maxwell, Boyer and Clothier were the 
high lights of the afternoon. 

On April 21 Swarthmore journeyed to Easton, where they 
chalked up another victory by downing Lafayette, 691/^-561/2. 
The meet hung in the balance until the last three events — the 
broad jump, two-twenty dash and a half-mile — when the 
Garnet invaders forged to the front and clinched the decision. 
While Captain Button and Atkinson, a promising Freshman, 
were winning first and second places in the broad jump. 
Maxwell gained an impressive victory in the half-mile and 
Alden and Poole duplicated their performance of the week 
before l)y taking first and second places respectively in both 
the hundred and the two-twenty-yard dash. 
It was at Lafayette that Baker broke the 
college record for the discus. Although 
hindered by a driving rain, he tossed his hundred and 
forty-four foot one inch throw. Not satisfied with gaining 
first place in the event, he proved himself the outstanding star 
of the meet by winning first and second places in the shot-put 
and javelin throw. Probably the l>est race of the afternoon 
was the two-mile run, in which Clothier, after trailing for 
seven laps, edged out Sigmund, distance star of the Maroon 
and White. Other contributors to the Garnet column were 
Boyer, with third in the mile run; Parrish, with a first and 
second in the high and low hurdles respectively; Lippincott, 
with a second in the shot-put; and Tilton, with a second in 



-^■^>c> 



C.Tptain-Elect 
Alden 










THE TEAM 

Coach Mercer, Atkinson, Tilton, Lippincott, Boyer, Manager Berry, 

Alden, Maxwell, Button, Parrish, Brown 



^m 



[255] 




Clothier 



the high jump. 

The following Friday and Saturday, April 27 and 28, 
Coach Mercer's Relay team, composed of Maxwell, Brown, 
Alden and Parrish, gained the Middle Atlantic Class B cham- 
pionship mile event, h)' defeating Dickinson, Gettysburg, 
Haverford, Delaware, Franklin and Marshall, Manhattan, 
Juanita, Alfred and Drexel. This was the race from which 
they were debarred last year through a misunderstanding. 
Maxwell and Brown secured a lead which Alden and Parrish, 
the anchor men, retained to nose out Gettysburg and Dickin- 
son runners. The time was three minutes, thirty-seven and 
four-fifths seconds. Baker, who was victorious in the discus 
throw two years ago, and second in last year's event, was 
hampered by wet turf and could secure only a fourth on a 
one hundred thirty-three foot, eight and one-half inch heave. 

The Lehigh victory of 
May 2, at Bethlehem, was 
one of the best meets of 
'28. Before the javelin 
throw and broad jump 
were completed the score 
was tied at 54-all. Baker's 
winning throw and the 
first of Captain Dutton in 
the broad jump clinched 
the meet for the invading 
Garnet. Dutton. who was 
then fully recovered from 
an injury, also scored an 
impressive victory in the 
century, when he equaled 
the college record of nine 
and four-fifths seconds. 
Baker retained his position of high scorer by handing in a 
triple win in three field events — the discus, shot-put and 
javelin. Spangler placed second in the javelin while Lippin- 
cott, a yearling, assured himself of a letter by scoring third 
in the discus. Parrish increased the Garnet's score by two 
victories — one of which resulted from his reducing the college 
record for the two-twenty-yard low hurdle by one-fifth of a 
second, and the other by his hundred-and-twenty-yard high 
hurdles win. Boyer, the only Quaker entry in the mile, 
broke the tape with a twenty-yard lead over Fine, the 
Brown-and-White runner. Tilton, with a jump of five feet 
nine inches, took first place in the high jump. Checkering 
of Lehigh, whom Maxwell defeated in a spectacular race last 
year, reversed the tables and crossed the line three yards in Maxwell 




Championship Relay Team 




256 




The Hundred Yard Dash in the Haverford Meet 



advance of the Garnet half- 
miler. Clothier, veteran two- 
miler, was unable to overcome 
the early lead of Sames, and 
placed second in that event. 
Brown and Alden were also 
defeated by Billmeyer and 
Captain Clayton, a Bethle- 
hem star, in the quarter-mile 
and two-twenty-yard dash, 
respectively. The final score 
was 68 to 58 in favor of 






Swarthmore. 

The Garnet experienced her first defeat when her traditional rivals, Haver- 
ford, gained a 65 to 59 point victory on Swarthmore field May 12. The break- 
ing of^the Haverford record of the shot-put, broad jump and two mile, and the 
equaling of the Garnet low hurdle record 
were the results of the fastest and closest 
meet of the season. 

During the entire struggle, the two 
teams were separated by only a few points. 
Morris' record-breaking throw of forty- 
six feet one and three-eighths inches of 
the shot-put gave the Scarlet and Black 
a one-point lead — Lippincott and Baker 
having secured second and third places. 
Swarthmore soon tied the score when 
Alden beat out two Haverford men in the 
hundred. 

However, McConhehy's victory over 
Parrish in the high hurdles placed the 
the lead. Then Maxwell's beautiful victory over Maw- 

,___^ , mile and the capturing of the first two places of the 

quarter-mile by Alden and Brown gave the Garnet a one-point advantage. 

Haverford regained the lead, 
which she maintained during 
the remainder of the after- 
noon, by taking both places 
in the high jump and by 
securing first and a tie for 
second in the pole vault. The 
next events, the two mile, 
broad jump, and low hur- 
dles, resulted in two broken 
and one tied record. Shird, 
The High Hnrdles in the Haverford Meet o£ Haverford, ran a pretty 



Boyer 

Main Liners in 
henney in the 



Brown 





257 




Parrisli 



two-mile race in the speedy time of ten minutes, twelve 
and two-fifths seconds; while Thomas, with a leap of 22 
feet 514 inches, nosed out Button in the hroad jump. 
Parrish then equaled his 25 1-5 seconds record for the 
hurdles, which he had secured at Bethlehem against 
Lehigh the week before. Probably the most sensational 
contest was the javelin throw, where Baker finally nosed out 
Swan, his Scarlet and Black opponent, with a one hundred 
sixty-four feet, four and one-quarter inch throw. The meet 
closed with Emsworth nosing out Alden in the furlong and 
Maxwell, with another spectacular finish, winning the half- 
mile. 

In the Annual Middle Atlantic States Track and Field 
Championships held on Wharton Field, Haverford, the Garnet 
invaders took third place with 24 points, while New York University won first 
honors with 61 points and Haverford second with 41. Since Swarthmore had 
qualified only four men in the preliminaries, as compared to 
nineteen for Haverford and twenty -six for N. Y. U., third place 
was the highest that had been prophesied for her in the 
finals. 

Captain Button, Alden, Baker, and Parrish amassed the 
total of 24 points for the Garnet in track and field entrees. 
Baker succeeded in retaining his championship in the discus 
for the fourth consecutive year, and also added another bit 
to the total score by taking fourth place in the javelin. Par- 
rish was high scorer for the Garnet, amassing eight points by 
scoring second in two events. Although forced to run four 
races, he showed excellent performances in both high and low 
hurdle dashes, finishing less than a yard behind the winners. 
Alden, also running four races, finished a close second in the 
centmy and placed fourth in the 220-yard dash. The remain- 
ing Garnet points were made by Button who won fourth places in both the hun- 
dred-yard dash and the broad jump. Maxwell, Clothier, and Boyer participated 
in the preliminary heats, but were unable to get into the finals. 
' ^ Baker, Swarthmore's only entry in the Annual Intercollegi- 

ate Track Meet at Harvard on May 25 and 26, captured fifth 
place in the discus when he tossed the metal plate 139 feet 
714 inches. 

Throughotit the season the steady good work of Captain 
Button, Alden, and Poole in the sprints, and Maxwell, Cloth- 
ier, and Boyer in the distance rims, Parrish in the hurdles, 
Tilton in the high jump, and Baker, Lippincott, Spangler, 
and Atkinson at the weights was largely responsible for the 
successful track season. Coach Mercer awarded Varsity letters 
to eleven men at the end of the season, five of whom were 
seniors. Baker retained his position as high scorer with a 
Li incott ^°^^^ °^ ^^ points; while Captain-elect Alden stood second with 




Atkir 




[258: 



37 and Parrish a close third with 36. 
The loss of Captain Button, Maxwell, 
Clothier, Baker, and Tilton will be sorely 
felt in the 1929 season, but with seven let- 
ternien back as a nucleus a good team 
should he developed to continue the record 
set by the 1928 team. Good material has 
been developing in the freshman class. 
Atkinson in the javelin and pole vault, 
Lippincott in the shot-put, and Atkiss, 
Noyes and Svmderland in the middle dis- 
tance runs and sprints, should prove valu- 
able men next year. Three men of the 
Championship Penn Relay Team will be 
back and should do well again in next vear's race. 





Coach Mercer 



Manager Berry 



April 14 Delaware and Drexel 

April 21 Lafayette 

April 27-28 Penn Relays 

May 2 Lehigh 

May 12 Haverford 

May 18-19 Middle Atlantics 

May 25-26 IntercoUegiates 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 
Home 
Away 
Away 
Home 
Home 
Away 
Away 



84 

691/2 

First Place 

68 

59 

24 

One Fifth Place 



Opponents 
D.2II4 Dr. 201/, 

561/2 



58 
65 



Totals . 



3041/2 



2211/2 



Ktnni^ 




T 




Captain Hammell 



*HE Swarthmore College Tennis team, 
under the direction of Captain C. Bert- 
ram Hammell, enjoyed another very suc- 
cessful year, losing only two matches out of 
the eleven that were played, and scoring 59 
points to their opponents' 28. Professor C. 
R. Bagley again did a good job of coaching, 
and the team was ably managed by Alex- 
ander McDougal, who also played number 
three on the team. Captain Hammell and 
Captain-elect Nicely, Nos. 1 and 2 respect- 
ively, were both constant winners and gave 
much towards the success of the team in both 
singles and doubles. No freshmen gained posi- 
tions on the team, but of those who played 
Captain Hammell, Nicely, Hodge and Mc- 
Diarmid had seen action the preceding year 
on the successful 1927 team and were all set 
to make 1928 another "Red Letter" season. 
The first match was played against the New York University team and 
Swarthmore emerged victorious by a 5-4 count. The Garnet added another 
scalp to the collection when Rutgers bowed to our racquets to the tune of 6-3, 
but after these two victories the S%varthmore team suffered the only two defeats 
of the season. The first of these came at the hands of Lehigh, which boasted a 
very strong team, including as it did Julius Seligson, the Intercollegiate cham- 
pion. The other defeat was suffered in the match with Penn. A. C, coming im- 
mediately after the Lehigh match. ' Following these two defeats the Quaker 
team set their feet firmly and swung their racquets to good advantage, taking 
the last seven matches on the schedule without a set-back. In this string of 
victories only one shut-out was scored, this being gained when the team, for 
the second consecutive year defeated the Pennsylvania Military College by 7-0. 
The season reached its climax with the last two matches of the year against 
Cornell and Haverford. Playing against the Cornell team, reputed to be one of 
the strongest in the East, the Garnet crashed through on the long end of a 
seven to two score, in one of the hardest fought matches that has been seen on 
the Wharton Courts in quite a while. Captain Hammell played superlative 
tennis to win his match and showed some strokes and pace that would not have 
been out of place on the lawns of the Germantown Cricket Club or in the bowl 
at Forest Hills. The last match was played against our traditional enemies from 
the Main Line and Swarthmore chalked up a 5-4 win over the Haverford tennis 
team as a fitting conclusion to one of the best seasons that any Swarthmore 
team has had for a long time. 

As the team lost only one intercollegiate match, and that to Lehigh, a team 
which did not play the requisite number of intercollegiate matches. Swarthmore 
was awarded the Middle Atlantic States Qiampionship. It looks as if the team 
Avill have a chance to repeat in 1929 as it lost only two men through graduation. 
We may readily hope to see Captain-elect Nicely bring the team through an- 
other equallv successful season next year. 



[260 




Manager McDougall, Brown, McDiarmid, Nicely, Coach Bagley, 
Hodge, Captain Hammell, Cohen 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthniore Opponents 

April 19 New York University at New York. ... 5 4 

April 20 Rutgers at New Brunswick 6 3 

May 4 Lehigh at Swarthmore 4 5 

May 5 Penn A. C. at Philadelphia 3 6 

May 10 University of Pittsburgh at Swarthmore 7 2 

May 11 Drexel University at Swarthmore .... 5 1 

May 12 Ursinus at Swarthniore 5 1 

May 15 Pennsylvania Military College 7 

May 17 University of Maryland at Swarthmore 6 1 

May 19 Cornell University at Swarthmore .... 7 2 

June 3 Haverford College at Swarthmore .... 4 3 



Totals 



59 



28 



Womtn'^ Athletics 







Cleaver Staley Harvey Newcomb Walton Tily 
Calhoun Rickards Bonner Booth 



Woeieii's Athletic Association 

OFFICERS 

President Marion Bonner, '29 

Vice-President Anna Rickards, '30 

Secretary Helen Booth, '31 

Treasurer Pauline Calhovm, '30 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

Anna Hull, '29 Mary Walton, '29 Marion Staley, '30 

Lily Tily, '29 Ruth Cleaver, '30 Elizabeth Newcomb, '31 

Jean Harvey, '31 
Miss Elizabeth Lanning, Director of Physical Education 



262 




r 



Winiiers of the Varsity S 



HOCKEY 



Lily Tily, Captain 
Mary Walton 
x\nna Rickards 
Ruth Cleaver 
Martha Roberts 
Ruth Caldwell 
Helen Booth 



Elizabeth Clack, Manager 
Elma Hurlock 
Barbara Pearson 
Caroline Jackson 
Jean Walton 
Elizabeth Stirling 
Arabel Jaquette 



BASKETBALL 



Mary Walton, Captain Dorothy Shoemaker, Manager 

Anna Rickards Elizabeth Stirling 

Betty Bennett Jean Harvey 

Elizabeth Newcomb 



SWIMMING 



Olive Filer, Captain 
Marion Geare 
Anna Biddle 
Caroline Jackson 
Kathryn Kerlin 
Alice Wardell 



Elizabeth Palmenburg, Manager 

Margaret Dewees 

Irene Nichols 

Mary Tyler 

Margaret Mix 

Sarah Stidham 



Priscilla Rawson 



s 



EnMlish S 



One of the greatest honors a Junior woman of Swarthmore can win is a blazer 
bearing the Old English S. Thirty-five points won by interest and participation 
in not less than three sports is the necessary requirement for eligibility for this 
award. It is significant of true sportsmanship, of fairness, good will and loyal 
cooperation. 

The blazers have been awarded to: 

Caroline Robison 
Lily Tily 
Mary Walton 



Mary Anderson 
Anna Hull 



[263 




I^ockep 




S' 



Captain Tily 



IWARTHMORE closed a singularly success- 
ful hockey season this year with a record 
of no defeats, and a total of 73 tallies to 
her opponents' 13. The steady, consistent play- 
ing of the entire team, and the spirit, and co- 
o])eration of each player were outstanding fea- 
tures in every contest. 

The first regular scheduled game was with 
the Merion Cricket Clulj, Friday, October 19. 
The visiting team was crippled by the absence 
of two of their best players, Anne Townsend, 
All- American star, and Captain Kitty Rohn; 
but despite this handicap, they showed good 
opposition, better, in fact, than the score would 
indicate. A total of eight goals was made by 
Swarthmore during the first period, but at the 
beginning of the second half the Merion team 
rallied, and besides scoring two goals themselves prevented Swarthmore from 
making more than four in the second half, l^ringing the score at the end of the 
game to 12-2. Betty Stirling, a freshman, and Mary Roberts, a veteran player, 
were outstanding on the Swarthmore offense, breaking through the Merion line 
again and again for goals, while Anne Page, AU-American in 1926. was the star 
on the Merion team. 

The following Friday, October 26, the team scored another 
victory, this time over Rosemont College. The Garnet com- 
pletely outplayed their opponents in every phase of the 
game, and rolled up a 4-0 lead in the first half, which became 
13-0 in the final period. Throughout the game the forward 
line showed scoring aljility, and the defense accurate inter- 
ception. 

The second game with Merion Cricket Club also turned 
out successfully, but both teams were forced to display real 
defensive hockey. In the first half accurate stickwork was 
the most outstanding feature, but there were also several 
beautiful stops at Swarthmore's goal before the Merion team 

scored. The ball was rushed far into both territories, and „ . „, 

«i T r Caplain-t^lect 

the teams were kept decidediv on the alert. At the end of Rickard^ 





the first half the chib led 3-2. In the second half, after a hard fight before the 
cage, the score was tied. The ^lerion players showed unusual ability in rapid 
advances, and the Swarthmore team made several quick, accurate shots near 
the goal. Finally Swarthmore scored the deciding point of the contest. Since 
Kitty Rolin, Anne Page, and Anne Townsend, all three Ail-American players, 
were in the opposing lineup, Swarthmore has every reason to be very proud 
of her victory over Merion. 

Despite the slippery field, which made the playing uncertain at all times, the 




Clack Booth Stirling Jackson Caiweli Thompsoii Jaquette Lanning 
Hurlock Pearson Rickards Tily M.Walton J.Walton 



The Team 

EHzabeth Clack, '29 Manager 

Lily Tily, '29 Captain 

'■'" ''''■•^■' { ^TJw'tait '?2 

'^""""- {EESot'sf 

Center Forward Mary Walton, '29 

Rieht Inner \ Elizabeth StirHng, '32 

I Arabel Jaquette, '32 

Right Wing Barbara Pearson, '30 

Center Halfback Martha Roberts, '31 

Left Halfback Ruth Cleaver, '30 

Right Halfback Lily Tily, '29 

Left Fullback Ruth Calwell, '31 

Right Fullback Carohne Jackson, '31 

Goal Keeper Helen Booth, '31 



'F^ 



[265: 



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M. Walton 





game with Ursinus on November 2 was fast, and the Garnet 
showed exceptional abihty in recovering the ball. The 
opposing team put up a splendid and spirited defense 
throughout, with Lake and Riddell as their stars. Although 
the ball was in their half of the field almost the entire 
second period they allowed only three more goals to be 
made. The outstanding players on the home team were 
Jackson and Tily in the backfield, and Richards and Walton 
on the forward line. The game resulted in a 9 to 4 victory 
for Swarthmore. 
With a series of five victories to its 
credit, the Swarthmore hockey team van- 
quished its most formidable foe, for the 
first time in the fifteen years of Swarth- 
more-Bryn Mawr games by a score of 7-3. It was a fast 
game, characterized by fine teamwork, and splendid evading 
and passing. The forward lines seemed to be evenly matched, 
but the Bryn Mawr backfield had difficulty in checking the 
furious charges of the Garnet players. Rebecca Wills, captain 
and center forward of the losing team, played a consistently 
good game,, while the whole opposing team showed good stick- 
work. Ruth Cleaver, '30, and Captain Tily, '29, played remark- 
ably well 
at half 
back, and 

Helen Booth, '31, goaler, pre- 
vented many scores from be- 
ing marked against the Gar- 
net. Carly Jackson, '31, also 
starred in her position at full 
back. The whole forward line 
passed and dribbled unusual- 
ly well. The first half was 
marked by 
terrific 
lunges, 
hits, and passes. Bryn Mawr was the first to score, and chalked 
up two goals before Swarthmore could penetrate the opposing 
defense. After several attempts to score, Betty Stirling, '32, 
right inner, dribbled down the field and drove successfully 
into the cage, and in less than a minute tallied again. Shortly 
after, the Bryn Mawr goaler accidentally kicked the ball into 
the cage. The last score of the half was made by Mary Wal- 
ton. In the second half, the Garnet defensive proved itself 
exceptionally strong, allowing but one goal to be scored. Anna 
Rickards tallied first, and Mary Walton followed with an- Calwell 



Cleaver 




u 



i^ 



i 



I 



266 1 





Huilock 



other score. Rebecca Wills gained the lone point for Bryn 
Mawr in the second half. After a second goal hy Rickards, 
the game was finished in darkness. 

On November 17 the hockey team continued its undefeated 
season by trouncing George Washington University on the 
Washington field by the overwhelming score of 18-0. Through- 
out the game Swarthmore kept Washington on the defensive 
by her excellent driving attack. The entire team showed fine 
training and excellent spirit in its teamwork, speed, and driv- 
ing force although the roughness of the field slowed down the 
game considerably. Consistent playing was 
a distinguishing feature of each attack. 
Mary Walton, Anna Rickards, and Betty 
Stirling played their usual excellent game. 
Stirling scored nine of the eighteen goals while Rickards shot 
three, and Walton tallied two. Although individual play was 
not as brilliant as in the previous games, due to a complete 
lack of competition, the whole team worked as a unit and 
personal starring gave way to a smoothly functioning co- 
operative game. 

The last hockey game of the year was played with the 
Swarthmore Club and the 10-1 victory which resulted leaves 
the Garnet team undefeated. Although the 
score was decidedly one-sided, Swarthmore 
did not show the same splendid form as in 
some of the previous games. Their teamwork was admirable, 
but the passing was frequently slow, and they too often 
missed the chance to intercept. The Club players, on the other 
hand, showed a decided weakness in teamwork, and were 
forced to rely almost solely on individvial playing. Both teams 
exhibited unusually fine stickwork, and there was hard fight- 
ing at the goals. 

In each of the seven games on this season's schedule, Eliza- 
beth Lanning's fine coaching has immeas- 
urably aided the team to secure its victories. 
This year's squad was distinguished by its 
remarkable teamwork, which was brought 
about partly by the marked individual improvement residting 
from hard practice and games, and partly by the decided inter- 
est and earnest effort of the entire team to improve in every 
way possible. 

Lily Tily, '29, has proven one of the most outstanding cap- 
tains a Swarthmore hockey team has ever had, and in each 
conflict has urged the players on to success. She is the first 
to lead a Garnet team to victory over Bryn Mawr, and is a 
veteran halfback of fours years' service who has always been 
Roberts ^ consistent defensive player. 



Jackson 





Pearson 



267 





Stirling 



Mary Walton, '29, ends her fourth year on the team. In that 
time her clever stickwork and marvelous speed in the im- 
portant position of center-forward has secured her a place 
which will be difficult to fill. 

Ruth Cleaver, '30, left halfback, has shown unusually neat 
stickwork, and in spite of the handicap of an injury resulting 
from a fall, has maintained a fine defense throughout the 
season. 

Anna Rickards, '30, is one of our fastest line players. She 
is always in position to receive a pass and send it on with a 
well-placed shot. Her teamwork is especially reliable. She 
has been elected captain of next year's squad. 

Helen Booth, '31, has proven a nearly impassable barrier 
in the goal, the principal reason for the small score of our 
opponents throughout the season. Her work is most trustworthy when the oppos- 
ing team puts up the strongest fight. 

Ruth Caldwell, '31, is dependable, sure and consistent in her 
position at left halfback. 

Elma Hurlock, '31, as left inner, has shown praiseworthy 
interest and energy in developing her playing to a fine type 
of hockey. Her stickwork is her most outstanding asset. 

Caroline Jackson, '31, gave up her o^\ti position as center 
halfback in the beginning of the year in order to work up into 
that of right fullback. Her cleverness in handling the ball 
and her consistent ability to stop and intercept made her es- 
pecially valuable. 

Barbara Pearson, '31, is quick with the ball and generally 
speedy. She holds her o'vvn decidedly well in scrimmage. 

Arabelle Jacquette, '32, is a forward line fresliman whose 
teamwork and careful passing are very commendable. Her 
playing generally showed a marked improvement through- 
out the season. 

Elizabeth Stirling, '32, is another freshman who won a letter for her forward 
line work. Her marvelous ability to shoot goals has made her 
the high scorer of the year. She is very quick and her playing 
is hard and accurate. 

Jean Walton, '32, has shown unusually fine stickwork for a 
first-year player. She is one of the team's fastest players. 

Altogether, with many individual performers of note and 
with the excellent coaching of Miss Lanning, the 1928 Hockey 
team was able to live up to the reputation of Swarthmore 
hockey teams, and was able to pass through a difficult season 
undefeated. 

Only two letterwomen will be lost by graduation, Captain 
Lily Tily and Mary Walton both graduating in June, so that 
Coach Lanning will have an almost veteran team to place in 
the field at the beginning of next year's season. With many 




J. Wahon 




JaqueUe 



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[268] 



!k€ 



Manager 
Clack 



promising underclass women as well as the 
new material which will report next year, 
the team should develop into an aggrega- 
tion of the first calibre. Under the leader- 
ship of Captain-elect Rickards the team will 
face an extremely diffictdt schedule next 
winter with the hopes of duplicating the 
excellent record of the undefeated 1928 
team. There is every reason for the mem- 
bers of the team to look forward to the 
coming season with hope and to look back 
upon the 1928 season with pride. 



Coach 
l.anning 



SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 

October 19 Merion Cricket Club 12 

October 26 Rosemont College 13 

October 29 Merion Cricket Club 4 

November 2 Ursinus 9 

November 9 Bryn Mawr 7 

November 17 George Washington 18 

November 23 Swarthmore Club 10 



73 



13 



[269; 



^ 



totmmtng 



1929 Sivimmiiig Revie^w 



I HE second year for the women's team re- 
sulted in a division of honors with our 
opponents. Out of four meets Swarthmore 
was victorious in two, but even when the final 
score was not in our favor each individual event 
was closely contested. Captain Olive Filer, '29, 
who has won every fancy diving event in which 
she was entered, and Elizabeth Palmenburg, '29, 
are the only letter women whom the squad will 
lose through graduation, but even without them, 
the prospect of a successful season next year is 
\ ery encouraging, for several freshmen have shown 
considerable ability in swimming and diving. 

The Garnet swimming team opened its season 
on February fourteenth when it met the strong 
New York University team in the home pool. 
Although outmatched by their opponents, the Swarthmore swimmers put up 
a strong and plucky defense against their rivals, and held them to 37-17 score. 
The Swarthmore team was in good condition due to rigorous training in their 
early season practices, but they were too easily winded and consequently lost 
much speed. Nevertlieless, the swimmers showed the effects of good coaching 
and steady practice and pointed toward a successful season to come. 

Captain Olive Filer, '29, won one of the few Swarthmore first places by 
her excellent work in the fancy diving event, while Biddle gave Wald, stellar 
performer for N. Y. U., a close race in the breast stroke event, one of the 
most hotly contested races of the afternoon, but was forced to take a second 
place from the New York swimmer. Caroline Jackson, '31, won two third 
places, one in the diving and the second in the breast stroke, while Kerlin's 
first in the back stroke race and Wardell's and Filer's third places in the 
two free style events completed the Garnet scoring for the day. 

The N. Y. U. defeat was avenged in the next meet of the season when a 
thoroughly trained squad of Swarthmore swimmers took every first place 
in a meet with Temple University freshmen on the seventh of March in the 
Swarthmore pool. The final score of 40-10 testified to the prowess of the Garnet 
swimmers, who had benefited from the excellent coaching and practice of 
the past few weeks. Filer was again the outstanding performer of the Swarth- 



Captain Filer 



270 



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X 



Tyler Jackson Jenkins Wardell Biddlc 
Rawson Stidham Mix Dewees Geare Nichols 



THE TEAM 
Olive Filer, '29, Captain 
Nancy Biddle, '30 
Marion Geare, '30 
Caroline Jackson, '31 
Margaret Dewees, '31 
Mary Tyler, '32 



Elizabeth Palnienburg, Manager 
Katliryn Kerlin, '31 
Margaret Mix, '31 
Alice Wardell, '31 
Priscilla Rawson, '32 
Sara Stidham, '32 



more team, accounting for two first places, one in the fancy dive and one 
in the back stroke event. 

The meet was fast and quite interesting, although the final score was quite 
onesided. Marion Geare, '30, tied her own pool record of 25:2 in the torty- 
yard free style, while the other races were correspondingly fast. Dewees, 
'31, won first place in the hundred yard sprint, Geare and Rawson shared 
first and second places in the forty-yard free style. Filer and Tyler duplicated 
this feat in the back stroke, while Jackson accounted for five points in her 
favorite event, the forty-yard breast stroke. To finish the meet the Swarth- 
more relay team, consisting of Filer, '29, Kerlin, '31, Stidham, '32, and Geare, 
'30, won its last first place in the time of 49:2 for the four twenty-yard laps. 
This meet, although it seemed a walkaway for the Garnet team, showed the 
power and speed which the swimmers had gained during the past month. 

For the next meet of the season the Garnet swimmers journeyed to Bryn 
Mawr, where they defeated the Main Liners by the score of 37-13 on Thursday, 
March 14. The Swarthmore team as a whole showed a higher calibre of 



[271] 




swimming, being generally faster than their opponents, but the individual 
contests of the meet were, in nearly every case, gained by a close margin. 
Bryn Mawr won first place in only one event, the forty-yard breast stroke, 
while Captain Filer came off with first honors in the three events she entered, 
the fancy dive, the ninety-yard swim and the back stroke event. 

Marion Geare accounted for the fourth first place for Swarthmore, when 
she turned in an excellent performance in the forty-yard free style, followed 
closely by Wardell, of Swarthmore, who took second place. Geare also placed 
third in the fancy diving event. The breast stroke was the only event in 
which the Bryn Mawr swimmers netted a first place, Bernheimer nosing out 
Biddle and Jackson of Swarthmore and forcing them to take second and 
third places respectively. The Swarthmore relay team, consisting of Wardell, 
E. Palmenburg, Rawson and Geare, clinched the meet when they turned in 
the four laps in neat fashion. 

The Bryn Mawr meet found the Swarthmore swimmers at the peak of their 
season, turning in the best performances of the year, but the next meet proved 
disastrous to an otherwise excellent season record when the fast Savage Normal 
School team swamped the Garnet swimmers by a 37-13 score. With a well- 
rounded and exceptionally fast aggregation, the Savage swimmers won all 
but two first places, these being won for Swarthmore by Captain Filer and 
Biddle. The competition in all the events was keen and brilliant, but the 
plucky Garnet team could not m^ake much headway against a decidedly faster 
and more experienced team. In their final meet of the season the Swarthmore 
swimmers did exhibit great skill, and showed that they were by no means 
inferior in training or practice to the faster visiting team. 

Looking forward to next year, the graduation of Captain Olive Filer will 
vacate a place which will be exceedingly difficult to fill. Her leadership of 
the team this year has been largely responsible for the success of the season, 
while her outstanding performances in her favorite events are not easily 
equaled. A consistent point winner, she has placed first in almost every 
event, and has been high scorer throughout the season. In the fancy dive 
she has proven herself one of the most skilled divers in the East, while her 
records in the hundred-yard free style and forty-yard back stroke point her 
out as one of the best all-round swimmers Swarthmore has seen for some 
time. 

Most of the other letter women will return next year, and with another 
year of experience and practice behind them, may be expected to develop into 
a team which will carry on the successes of the first two years of the history 
of the Swarthmore women's swimming team. 



Marion Geare has been elected captain, 
and should prove an able leader for next 
year's team. She has shown exceptional 
ability in the free style events, lowering 
her own 40-yard record by one second in 
the Savage meet. Nancy Biddle and Eleanor 
Jenkins are two other veterans who should 
show up well on next year's team, while 
the sophomore class, with Alice Wardell, 
Margaret Dewees, Kathryn Kerlin, Caro- 
line Jackson, and Margaret Mix, should 
add good material to the team. Dewees has 
won recognition in the forty-yard and 
hundred-yard free style events, while Ker- 
lin and Jackson may be expected to duplicate their feats in the back stroke 
events. Jackson has also shown up well in the diving events this season. 

Four freshmen have developed into varsity swimmers and should prove valu- 
able to the teams of the future. Priscilla Rawson, Sara Stidham, Mary Tyler, and 
Irene Nichols have all done well during the past season and promise to aid the 
Garnet during the next three years. Altogether, with the exception of the loss 
of Captain Olive Filer, the team should uphold the Garnet creditably in the 
swimming world next year. 





Manager 
Palmenburg 



Coach 
Lanning 



SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 0pp. 

Feb. 14 New York University at Swarthmore 17 37 

Mar. 7 Temple University at Swarthmore 40 10 

Mar. 14 Bryn Mawr at Bryn Mawr 37 13 

Mar. 17 Savage Normal at Swarthmore 13 37 



107 



97 





s 



Captain Walton 



\^ ARTHMORE was fortunate this year 
in the addition of several able Sopho- 
mores and Freshmen to the team to re- 
place the several stars lost l)y graduation. 
Because of its inexperience the team could 
not uphold the undefeated record of the pre- 
vious seasons, but were victorious in four out 
of the possible seven games. 

The season opened with a practice upset 
with Temple on Saturday, February 2. The 
^vhole game was characterized by slow pass- 
ing and inaccurate shots by both teams. ^ ith 
an unfavorable score of 11 — 4 at half time, 
the Swarthmore team rallied, but the A-isitors 
managed to keep the lead until the whistle, 
making the final score 20 — 16. Anna Rick- 
ards was high scorer for the Garnet Sextet, 
netting five field goals during the game. 

In the first scheduled game of the season, on Feliruary 9, the Swarthmore 
sextet defeated Adelphi at Brooklyn, by the overwhelming score of 46 — 20. 
It was a one-sided but well-played contest, featuring fast and accurate passing 
on our part. The whole team seemed to have improved since the practice 
game of the week before. ^ e immediately gained the lead in the first quarter, 
holding and increasing it steadily throughout the entire game. In the second 
quarter, the Adelphi Sextet rallied, gaining one foul and four field shots, 
which was their highest scoring in any one period. At the end of the half, 
Swarthmore was leading 21 — 22. The second half showed the smooth and 
Steady manoeuvers of the whole team to great advantage, and was distinguished 
by a regular increase in the Garnet's score. Bettv Bennett scored 34 of the 
total 46 points. 

After its brilhant \actory over Adelphi the previous week, the Swarthmore 
Sextet went down to defeat before the team of Slippery Rock State Teachers' 
College to the score of 45 — 26. The passing of the opposing team was superb 
and in spite of the excellent work of our guards, Jean Harvey and Martha 
Wood, they scored one basket after another. Swarthmore rallied somewhat 
in the second half bringing the score up to 17 points, but not enough to defeat 
our speedy opponents, who have one of the finest teams we have ever played. 
The next day, February 20, the Garnet staged a most effective comeback in 



^^ 



a game with Rosemont. The final score of 56 — 36 was the result of fast and 
accurate playing on the part of the Swarthmore team. Both teams were in 
good condition hut Rosemont was obviously outplayed by Swarthmore's quick 
passing, good intercepting, and accurate shooting. The passwork between our 
forwards was worthy of special praise. The Rosemont game was added to our 
schedule last year when Swarthmore was also triumphant. This year showed 
an improvement in Rosemont's team as a whole. The game was most exciting, 
with both teams fighting desperately, and Swarthmore forging ahead through 
several brilliant plays. 

On March 8 the annual Alumnae basketball game was 
played. The alums came back with an all-star team and 
handed the Varsity a 57 — 41 defeat. They played a steady 
well-balanced game, in which the work of Gert JoUs at for- 
ward and Alice Jenkinson at center was particularly out- 
standing. Their unusual speed and endurance throughout 
the game inspire our sincere congratulations. The Varsity 
lacked speed in passing and ability in intercepting and 
breaking up their opponents' plays. Helen Booth at side- 
center played a fast game, and Anna Rickards, at forward 
shot the majority of the baskets for the losers. Its all- 
Swarthmorean character made the game unusually interes*- 
ing. 

With a very spectacular and dramatic finish, the Swarth- 
more Sextet defeated George Washington University on 
March 15 in the men's gj^mnasium liv a score of 38 — 30. The teamwork and 
passing of our opponents was good throughout the entire game, and Swarth- 




Captain-Elect 
Bennett 




Lanning Neweomb Michener Booth Wood Stirling 
Harvey Rickards Walton Bennett Seaman Shoemaker 



[275 




Stirling 



niore's playing, although rather poor at first, improved remarkably in the last 
half. At the first whistle the opponents forged ahead, retaining their lead through- 
out the first three quarters, but at no time advancing more than seven points 
beyond the Garnet. At half time the score stood 15 — 10 in favor of G. W. U. 
and 27 — 27 at the end of the third quarter. 
__^ Lagging by five points, Swarthmore spurted in the last 

eight minutes and vs^ith swift, accurate passing, and steady, 
well-controlled shots, reduced the visitors' lead, ending the 
game seven points ahead. Betty Bennett was again high 
scorer. The play, especially in the last half, was fast and 
clean, and the game was always thrilling since neither team 
was ever entirely out of danger. 

Swarthmore's basketball season closed with a 32 — 22 tri- 
umph on Saturday, March 16, when they played Bryn Mawr, 
on Bryn Mawr's floor. The Garnet players took the lead at 
the ofi:set and kept well ahead of their opponents all during 
the first half. Their passing was well planned and usually 
successful. The shooting was also accurate, and few of their 
attempts failed, whereas Bryn Mawr was unfortunate in her attempted shots. 
At the opening of the second half our team was leading 20 — 7, but in the third 
quarter Bryn Mawr came back with renewed power and de- 
termination to win. They played better than at any other - - 
time during the game and succeeded in making the score 
dangerously close. In the fourth quarter Swarthmore again 
forged ahead and ended the game with a nine-point lead. 

This game brought to a close the season, in which Swarth- 
more registered 255 points to its opponents' 230. This season 
was not comparable to the past brilliant ones, but considering 
that the team was largely composed of inexperienced material 
it was quite succesful. Although a new member on the team, 
Elizabeth Stirling, as center, succeeded in getting the tap-off 
in nearly every game, and with the cooperation of the side- 
center, Mary Walton, in sending it down to Swarthmore's 
basket. Betty Bennett and Anna Rickards 
have constantly boosted the Garnet's score 
by well-aimed shots, while the guards have 
worked hard to dampen the ardor of opposing forwards. 

Since only one letterwoman, Captain Mary Walton, will be 
lost by graduation this year, the 1930 basketball team has 
every reason to develop into a squad of championship calibre. 
Captain-elect Bennett, whose team work and individual skill 
have made her a valuable player for several years, should 
prove a competent leader of next year's team, while Anna 
Rickards, '30, will be another valuable veteran on the court, 
.lean Harvey, the only sophomore on the varsity team, has 
played a good defensive game, and has proven herself a steady, 
Rickards dependable player, while two freshmen, Elizabeth Stirling 





Newcomb 



®r— 




and Elizabeth Newconib, have demon- 
strated marked ability during the past sea- 
son. Stirling at center and Newcomb in the 
guard position should both prove to be 
valuable veterans for the court teams of 
the future. 

With five varsity women on the court at 
the beginning of next year's basketball sea- 
son, and with plenty of substitute material, 
both in the freshman class and in the upper 
classes, the 1930 team can well look forward 
with hope to the coming season. Under the 
direction of Miss Lanning, who has for 
many seasons demonstrated her ability in 
coaching the women's athletic teams of 

Swarthmore, 1930 should see another Garnet court team which will uphold the 

records made by Swarthmore teams of the past. 




Manager 
Shoemaker 





Coach 
Laiining 



SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

February 2 Temple University 20 16 

February 9 Adelphia College 46 20 

February 19 SHppery Rock S. T. College 26 45 

February 20 Rosemont College .56 36 

March 8 Alumnae 41 57 

March 15 George Washington University 38 30 

March 16 Bryn Mawr 32 22 

259 226 



( '! ) \ \ 



'211' 



jHap Baj) 



Order of Exercises 

May Pole Dance on East Campus 

Senior — Junior Step Songs 

Procession of May Queen 

Dance — Drama; Maeterlinck's "Blue Bird'' 



M 



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AY DAY, 1928, was 
celebrated in the 
E"-*; •* . J_ T _■_ true spirit of the 

May traditions: — with song 
and dance, with flowers and 
radiant spring weather. 
Many alumni and visitors 
were back for the biennial 
festival, and they entered 
in no less than the college, 
to the gayety of the cele- 
bration which was carried 
through as smoothly and 
ardently as any English 
May Day of years gone by. 
At two o'clock in the 
oval to the east of Parrish Hall, forty-eight undergraduates, from all four classes, 
executed an old English coimtry dance, and wound the Swarthmore May-pole 
with streamers of Garnet and White. Immediately after the dance, the freshmen 
and sophomores lined up on either side of the walk in front of the east door, 
while the seniors in caps and gowns stood luider the portico and sang their step 
song to Alma Mater. Each senior carried the May-basket of spring flowers left 
at her door before breakfast by a stealthy freshman, and the bright colors seemed 
to brighten up the sombre senior robes. The seniors then gave over the steps to 
the juniors who sang the old song again as they took their rightfully inherited 
places; and all four classes joined in singing the traditional step-ceremony song — 
"Where, Oh Where?" This resigning of the steps to the succeeding class is for 
the seniors the beginning of farewell — a very lovely, if somewhat worn tradition. 
As the strains of the song died away, the Queen of the May, Elizabeth Vaughn, 
'28, and her attendants, Martha Wood, '31, Maid of Honor, and Agnes Hood, '29, 



[ 2-K 1 



Elizabeth Ogden '29. Jean Fahringer. '30. and Marian Hamming, '30, took their 
places at the head of the procession. The attendants were beautifidly robed in 
vari-colored medieval costumes with flowing sleeves and trains, their loose hair 
bound with lace fillets. The Queen's gotvn was white satin trimmed with gold 
lace the color of her hair. The procession crossed the campus in front of Parrish, 
and down to the sky-roofed platform of Magill Auditorium, where sunlight and 
leaves cast morning shadows upon the stage set for one of the prettiest May Day 
pageants ever given at Swarthmore — "The Blue Bird," a dance drama adapted 
from Maeterlinck's immortal play. 

The Queen of the May was throned and crowned with due ceremony by her 
court. Her attendants grouped themselves about her and the play was on. The 
stage has suddenly become "Tiny Forest," near the border of the land of 
Unreality. We see the two children, Tytyl, Marion Hall, '29, and Mytyl, Virginia 
Stratton, '30, just waking up after a sleep in the forest, where they have stopped 
exhausted in their search for the Blue Bird of happiness. They are wakened 
by the entrance of the May Queen and her attendants who in the play take the 
roles of The Queen of Light and Rays of Light. The wistful children beg the 
Queen to help them in their search, and she graciously gives Tytyl a little green 
cap, at the front of which is an enchanted diamond. She explains that if Tytyl 
turns the precious stone, Fairy Folk from the land of Unreality will come to them. 
Tytyl puts on the cap and begins experimenting. As he twists the diamond the 
Hours spin by in fleeting dance, twelve of them — Jeannette Poore and Esther 
Wilson, '28, Roberta Boak, Carohne Forstner, Betty Pearson, and Dorothy Shoe- 
maker, '29, Ruth Cleaver, Cecilia Garrigues, Merida Grey, Eloise Hettinger, and 
Marion Staley, '30, and Esther Seaman, '31. They vanish to be followed by the 
swirling, blazing Flames who dance in ecstasy about the stage — Olive Deane and 
Anne Thompson, '28, Caroline Robison, '29, Nancy Deane and Marion Geare, '30, 
and Ann Brooke, '31. But Tytyl has turned the diamond too far and hurriedly 
turns it back to bring on the Dog, Olive Filer, '29, the Cat, Marion Bonner, '29, and 
Candy, Lily Tily, "29. These do an amusing clog dance for the children, who are 
delighted but impatient in their eagerness to find the Blue Bird. At the Queen's 
suggestion, Tytvl sends to 



the palace of Night to see 
whether the Blue Bird is 
there. But in response to 
his call instead of the Blue 
Bird come six mischievous 
Imps; Jeannette Poore, '28, 
Roberta Boak, Dorothy 
Shoemaker, and Betty 
Pearson, '29, and Ruth 
Cleaver and Cecilia Gar- 
rigues, '30. The Imps have 
stolen the moon and 
are frantically scurrying 
around for a place to hide 
it. Thev finallv sit on it 



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Ti-" ~'"TV' ? ~?'^WW?"jniKff'!Iii\'i!llB just in time — for in come 

the Stars, searching for 
their mistress. The Stars, 
Dorothy Brown and Esther 
Wilson, '28, Caroline Forst- 
ner, '29, Merida Grey, 
Eloise Hettinger, and Mari- 
on Staley, '30, and Esther 
Seaman, '31, dance plead- 
ingly around the Imps, and 
finally rescue the moon 
and take her hack to the 
Palace of Night. Then, in 
a misty dream cloud come 
, the Blue Birds — Olive 
Dean, '28, Caroline Robi- 
son and Betty Lou Thompson, '29, Nancy Deane, '30, and Ann Brooke, '31. But 
as soon as the Blue Birds leave the dream cloud and enter the Land of Light, 
they die and flutter sadly to the ground. The children are terribly disappointed, 
but the Queen suggests that they send to the Palace of Happiness, for surely the 
Blue Bird must live tliere. Tytyl in his excitement again turns the stone too 
far and the Gross Luxm'ies appear. They are Vanity, Ada Fuller, '30, Fat Laugh- 
ter, Sarah Fisher, '30, and Riches, Katherine Rittenhouse, '28. Dismayed, Tytyl 
again works the magic spell and through the gates of Unreality come Sunny 
Hours, Little Happinesses and Satisfying Sounds — Dorothy Brown, '28, Marion 
Staley, '30, Esther Seaman, '31, Jeanette Poore, '28, Roberta Boak, Dorothy Shoe- 
maker, and Betty Pearson, '29, and Ruth Cleaver and Cecilia Garrigues, '30, 
Emlyn Hodge, Edna Rattey, and Mary Lovi Robison, '28, Olive Filer, '29, Lily 
Tily, '29, and Josephine Aremaine, '30. All of these charm and delight the 
children with their clever dances but none of them bring the Blue Bird. Finally 
the Great Joys appear — Anne Thompson and Olive Deane, '28, Alice Hutchinson, 
Gertrude Paxson, Caroline 
Robison, and Betty Lou 
Thompson, '29, Nancy 
Deane, '30, Marion Geare, 
'30, and Ann Brooke, '31. 
They dance for the chil- 
dren, and everything — 
time, sorrow — all are for- 
gotten. The two little 
searchers have fallen 
asleep once more. The 
beautiful Queen of Light, 
seeing this, smiles gently 
on them and vanishes with 

her maidens back into the ^^b Jisa^-i.iiii^'-'. 
Land of Nowhere. Then 



[280] 



Tytyl wakes and looks wonderingly about him, remembering all the beautiful 
dreams he has had. He wakes Mytyl and together they find the cage which they 
brought with them empty — now no longer empty. For there, singing joyously, 
is the long sought Blue Bird of Happiness, which has come to them of its own 




>>^-;N£i^^gKJ^j£tei^-:^ia^^ 



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Co btetu ^toarti^more 
life tDiti^ a bit of good* 
t»tll and a laug^ of 
gooD^natured i^umot 
toe notD turn to ti^c 
feature igection of t^ijS 
boofe. 



282' 



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PERISH HALL 

"A refined hostelry for young ladies and gentlemen" 



For the convenience of young people of refinement, we have here 
builded a four-storied edifice having all the comforts of home. . . . 
This hostelry is completely equipped with a heatless piping system, 
and is fumitured throughout by an eager hand and lavish purse. 
. . . Our food is simple, honest, and plain. It is prepared to 
create a love for home in the minds of our guests, and usually 
has that effect along with several others. . . . We provide ample 
facilities for mental and physical recreation, including croquet, 
marbles, checkers, and hoop-rolling. . . . We desire thy 
patronage. . . . 

Caroline & Lukens, Props. 



(We print above a pleasing tintype of the young ladies and their escorts gamboling 

on the nearby green.) 



6} 
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284 



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—G I /pfiNC oTT, Jf- 



THE jTAFF of "LIFE ' 

LUKE X. BANANA Associate Editor S. LIGHTLY FUST Social t-aitor 

PRETZEL N. BEER Art Editor 

Swarthmore Life offers due apologies to the editors, artists and contributors 
of comic magazines, who have been the inspiration of much ol this work. 

"WHY STUDENTS GO HOME" 
A Group of Sobby Sentimental Ballads 
Showing the Way Innocent Children 
Are Thrust Forth Into the Cruel World 

by that old master of snijfles and sighs 
HAL C. YUN 



Back home again 
Went frosh Bill Gimn 
Whose average was 
Point naught naught one 

There was no chance 
For Robert Mission 
Who tried to kill 
The dietician. 

The Dean threw out 
Poor Daniel Fizzes 
Who always cut 
His ten-minute quizzes 



The hope for Brown 
Became much weaker — 
He hissed and booed 
The Collection speaker 

The last to leave 
Was Sammy Reims 
Whose Ford Coupe 
Was tagged six times 

They rode out Jones 
On the fastest freight 
For coming to Chem lab 
Two hours late. 



"Outside" said Prex 
To Sam McGuff 
Who claimed the profs 
Didn't know their stuff. 



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[285] 



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sags sg?agi ^SiE?i!s ;i'j^';iU'Ki!!iU¥iJiiuj?^^ 



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Ml an 

as One 

Honors Student 



7:45- 



9:00- 



-Wakes up, listens to other students 
hurrying madly to make break- 
fast and 8 o'clock classes, smiles 
happily to himself and goes back 
to sleep. 

-Gets up and dresses himself leis- 
urely. Eats a hearty breakfast in 
his room, reading a couple of vol- 
umes of Schopenhauer between 
mouthfuls. 
10:00 — Saunters casually down to the 
Library and spends a couple of 
hours in a seminar room, chatting 
with the co-eds and annotating a 
copy of Kant's Critique of Pure 
Reason. 
12:20 — Condescends to mingle with the 
common herd long enough to eat 
lunch. 
1:30 — Attends seminar at professor's 
house. Spends afternoon lounging 
in easy chair, smoking, and dis- 
cussing in a bored fashion James 
Joyce, Einstein's latest theory, 
Santayana, O'Neill's theory of 
dramatic construction, Edna St. 
Vincent Millay, the latest issue of 
The Dial, and the difficulty of get- 
ting good gin around college. 

-Takes the train into Philadelphia. 
Passes the time by reading the 
American Mercury and trying to 
catch the eye of the girl across 
the aisle. 

Dines at a Bohemian restaurant 
and tries to "make" the girl of 
the professional dancing team. 



5:00- 



6:30- 



s S 
Is 



an 



8:30 — Goes to the opera and leaves in 
the middle of the first act with 
the audible comment of "Rotten!" 

10:00 — Meets some convivial companions 
who know where large quantities 
of the real stuff can be obtained. 

11:00 — He and his companions pick up 
some chorus girls and the party 
successfully crashes the wettest 
night club in town. 




Impressions of an Honors student's life — 
by one who has never been one. 

1:00 — Approaches the orchestra leader 
and offers to play any instrument 
in the orchestra. Upon being re- 
fused, sets about smashing up the 
furniture and is removed by his 
friends. 

3:00 — Arrives back at college, wakes up 
his roommate to tell him good- 
night, and slowly undresses, try- 
ing to decide whether to go home 
and write a new "Strange Inter- 
lude" or to stay at college and 
live one. 




THE GARNET SERENADERS "MUSIC FROM THE IMMORTALS 



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[286] 




We Nominate for the Hall of Fame 





Dean Rum-and-W ater 

Who has been Dean for 57 years and 
stilj hopes to eliminate Freshman par- 
ties; who gives entertaining receptions 
for students who have lost interest in 
classes; who has not missed a faculty 
baseball game in ten years; who is the 
most talked about man in college. 




Josiah Penniless, C.U.D. 

Who is the best third assistant 
janitor that has ever trod the 
campus; who graduated with 
honors from the Philadelphia 
Window-Cleaners College; who 
is a charter member of Gotta 
Getit Clean fraternity; who is 
above all a gentleman and a 
scholar. 




T. Percy Leffingwell 

Who is the only man that has 
ever made five touchdowns in a 
touch football game; who is first 
hose-lender of the dormitory fire 
department; who holds the rec- 
ord for the shortest time ever 
taken to eat early lunch; who 
cannot play a saxophone. 



Prof. Phineas Z. Hossenpheffer 

Who was intercollegiate marbles 
champion while he was in col- 
lege; who is now one of the 
most liked professors in the 
gym department; who has suc- 
cessfully coached varsity wrest- 
ling and maypole dancing teams 
that are a credit to their Alma 
Mater. 



;^^:^jMar( Si " iy i i Ui i y i t u' i y- iUi ig^j-' iUi - a^ - ^ ts^ '- ^ j ' ^ j J^ '-j^ i^^ i^ 'Si t^i tj^* '-^ i!j?t!gigns!S?iSiiyiiiyta&iUi t:^ 



FRANCES BLANSHARD— Her Diary 






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Sunday — Lp betimes, and to an early 
morning walk before meeting. Did ob- 
serve a whole carload of yovmg people, 
returning to college, evidently out on the 
same errand — which pleased me, seeing 
that the college as a rule has little love for 
fresh air. To meeting and did meditate 
most serenely upon the evils of our cam- 
pus and their remedies. Full Moon ! Had 
uncomfortable feeling that the 40 vard 




great astonishment, that four of my girls 
were ten minutes late from a dance. — did 
gently reprove the escort of one for his 
seeming lack of responsibility. Noticed 
two college couples talking in the hall, 
and pondered on a way to end this. — ^the 
college has a sad reputation of being a 
"Quaker Match-Box," but our honors 
uork, and scholastic standing should be 
our primarv responsibility. Consequent- 
ly, was forced to social pri-^dlege and cam- 
pus several of the more persistent offend- 
ers. Helped Brand form some questions 
for an Ethics quiz. Prayers and so to bed. 



_rjr_7r!: 



Forty Yard-line Clulihouse 

club was in session, but coidd observe no 
fact to prove it. Must consult Jimmie. — 
And so to bed. 

Monday — To my office early, feeling full 
of energy-, for the beginning of a new 
week. Consulted books and found, to mv 




To Collection . . .was the only one there. 




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[288 






Tuesday — To collection, and I the only 
^ person on the platform, which greatly 

grieved me. Dined with Miss Stilz at col- 
lege off a good dish of soup, hash peanut 
salad, and pale cookies. Am totally unable 
to understand the complaints of our stu- 
dent body, concerning the food, for my- 
self, considered it delicious. Served tea at 
afternoon seminar, and all very merry. 
Am wondering what the good Lord will 
decree in respect to this Fraternity ques- 
tion; noticed Phoenix to be full of per- 
sonal opinion concerning it. Have formed 
no definite opinion myself — Ah, well! 

Wednesday — Up betimes and to an in- 
terview with . I did tell her that 

her attitude was indeed wrong, and many 
other such sweet nothings, hoping might- 
ily the while that she would perceive the 
real underlying point. But do fear her 
mind is too much taken with other mat- 
ters. Was most forcibly reminded of the 
noise in Parrish by our dear Miss Stilz. 
Our girls are not developing their oppor- 
tunities to the inmost by studying during 
their leisure time. Visited Fraternity meet- 
ings, to discourse concerning the question 
of holding dances on campus. After 
carefid consideration of all points, am 
thoroughly convinced that they are much 
cozier, and more desirable on campus. 
Was rather disappointed in the opposition 
that I found; concluding a rather discour- 
aging day. 

Thursday — Lp betimes, with a more 
gracious and patient feeling. So to col- 
lection, and listened to Mr. Joseph Cal- 
houn, an illustrious Senior, give a con- 
if vincing discussion on some subject, which 

:| while I don't remember it, must most cer- 

:^ tainly have been correct. Dean Walters in, 

much elated with a long list of girls of 
no brains, personality, or background, but 
marvellous possibilities — a man given to 
overmuch looking on the bright side of 
life, but Lord! we all have our failings. 

Praise be to God, Have at last found a 
Friend of sufficient ability to be given an 
open scholarship! And so to bed. 

Friday — Received a delegation from 
some Fraternities imploring me not to 
force the use of Bond upon all dances. 
Referred the matter again to Student 
Government, wondering mightily the 
while at their strange affection for cars, 
only after all another means of locomo- 
tion. Endeavored to convince an apparent- 
ly lax student that her classes should ex- 
tend over the whole week including Sat- 
urdays, since much more time could be 



devoted to each subject. Students seem 
to have a great horror of Saturday 
classes, we must have more of them!! 

Samrday— Chaperoned a College Dance 
tonight, and hardly approve of the danc- 
ing of some of our more unruly yotmg 
ladies. Refrained from all comment, how- 
ever, mean^vhile wishing that they might 
be given the opportunity of seeing how 
they look. Contemplated on our college 
in general, though, and find that it is a 
pretty fair place after all. With these 
thoughts, and so to bed. 




Dean Walters — "The names of your par- 
ents, if you please." 

Jack— "Papa and Mama." 

Breakfast Goer— We asked for eight 
apples — we get seven oranges! 

Waitress — I threw the bad one away. 




Student in Special Topics: I hear the 
Dean is going to stop petting on the campus. 

Second Loafer: Yes. I think a man 
of his age should have done it long ago. 



f 289 1 



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More Bird Baths for Swarthmore 



bust- 
huii- 



VOILA Swarthmore — a hustling, 
ling, up-to-date college of five 
dred-odd men, women and honors 
students ( and some of them are pretty odd, 
too, we can tell you) , where every kind of 
comfort and luxury is provided for their 
convenience. There are large and airy 
dormitories and class rooms where they 
may sleep undisturbed; there are spacious 
dining halls where that imerring aim with 
a crumpled pa- 
per napkin so 
characteristic of 
a Swarthmore 
student, may be 
acquired ; the 
institution is a 
veritable palace 
of ease where no 
discomfort o r 
unhappiness is 
allowed to en- 
ter. This is an 
excellent ar- 
rangement a s 
far as it goes, 
and one highly 
to be praised, 
but it must be 
added that it 

does not go far enough. It will be noted that 
only human beings and human beings alone 
derive any benefits from this policy of ease 
and comfort for everyone. What of the 
other creatiu-es that live on Swarthmore's 
fair campus? What, for instance, of our 
little feathered friends, by which we mean, 
of course, the birds? Are there any meas- 
ures taken for their comfort? Does the 
Board of Managers have their well-being at 
heart? The answer is emphatically no! No! 
This is a great wrong and we call on every 
true Swarthmorean to bend his or her every 
effort toward rectifying it. 




The Bird Bath Committee 



It is estimated that some 3,765 birds 
(not counting flamingoes and bald eagles) 
inhabit the trees and shrubbery of the 
campus of Swarthmore College. A startling 
number, surely, yet students who have been 
awakened at 5:30 a. m. by their songs are 
tempted to place the total even higher. Be 
that as it may, the point we are striving to 
make is that so far nothing has been done 
for these feathered denizens of our campus. 

Some facetious 
students no 
doubt will sug- 
gest that a shot- 
gun and several 
]5oxes of shells 
would do for 
them very nice- 
ly, hut that is 
an irrelevant 
suggestion and 
one to be ig- 
nored. 

It is the aim 
of the Swarth- 
more College 
Bird Bath Asso- 
ciation, which 
was formed in 
the interval be- 
tween this and the preceding paragraph, 
to place at various points on the campus a 
number of useful as well as ornamental 
bird baths for the convenience of the 
little songsters. Up until now our little 
feathered companions have been forced to 
make their morning ablutions in the plush- 
mill tainted waters of the Crum, and any 
one who has tried to swim in the Crum 
knows what a distasteful experience that 
is! Now, or just as soon as the S. C. B. B. A. 
gets any money, the little troubadours of 
the woods and fields will be able to bathe or 
(Continued on page 323) 



[290] 



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Get out the old silver goblet 



For we all came to college 




With Swarthmore written on it 



But we didn't come for knowledge 




■p C.LrpPlh'Coff^St— 



And open up another keg of beer 



laaSggggi'' fi^ tTmra^^TajfTTii'TriiTynityiiVTri fraiint irriiTB friiifniit?SiSi 



So we'll read for honors while we're here 






[291] 



r.yiiwjiyji 



^Siisa^asa^i3a!®^-!r^as{fa{i^ffis«s8ii!!^^ 



Hia^!iia!}.iiuiiiLi^ ^ Jii!a!i 'XiiiJi ''UifXii^'iJj"iJi''i Ji&J}'^3J^jr^-r-i 



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Rosie- 
Holmes. 



-I can't get along with Duckee 



Myer — Why not? 

Rosie — All he does is ignore me, and if 
there's anything I hate it's ignorance. 





Five Senators was having tea on the 
capitol steps. "What d'ya think of the law 
to make a national park?" asks the gent 
from Chester who was bailing out the 
Orange Pekoe. 

"I'm for it" pipes up the second crook. 
"The streets is getting crowded something 
terrible." Deal me another sandwich, Mr. 
President, you know I simply detest mus- 
tard. 



UlST E weo 



Dear Sooky: 

It seems as how the pore children go to 
play in the front yard of a school named 
Swarthmore every spring. Beezer said he 
heard the Gambinos talking it over so me 
and the fellers thought we would go too. 
So we joined onto the gang and a nice lady 
with a nose like a shoe-button took us on 
the bus we went to this place called 
Swarthmore and it was cold but the flow- 
ers are nice, they have the biggest yard I 
ever saw for a house and it's all hills back- 
wards forwards and sidewards and a place 
they call the aserfaltum which is a walk 
stretched both directions with steps, they 
must have awful strong pupils at this 
school because I am a strong man and my 
legs was tired when I got to the top. al- 







^ ^ 


(fe. 


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Prof. yanks rope lettiii!; hound fall on board, causing water to dampen cat, 
who exits toute de sweet. Rope on hound's neck causes propeller to revolve, 

thus pushing exam papers into respective boxes. '3 

Swarthmore Prof. Marking Papers and Putting Cat Out at the Same Time. 

(Reg. U. S. Pat. Off.) 



;E 



[292] 



'iJi 'iJi}}Ui'''X!i'&Ji&M 'iM^JdiiLU'^iJiVJi''XJiiiUi&Ji\i^iiJi'i^}^^ tia!} iSal^ iiaii 'iJj t^'iSat.' iUiiiyjiUi feJi'-JaJi^iSL-^' t!^ tyj '^'jJaliiiLiiiiai! iUiiiyJiyiiyjim! iJi JM iJ A 



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I 



though there was no chairs or benches or 
anything in fack to sit on the way up 
except the aserfaltum and it was cold and 
I got suspichus glances frum boys and girls 
as they went by. Boys and girls both go to 
this school. 

Me and the fellers went in a big gray 
building with a big clock what dings ding 
dong ding dong every five minutes, it's the 
ringinest clock I ever heard. We went in 
to see was it church or somethin and sure 
enuf it did seem to be for a lady said sh-h 
at us like the lady what says sh-li at us in 
chm-ch. Everybody was readin the bible i 
guess because they all had books. We was 




— Cwftva-i For. Trtg as e R.PftuToivv 

tiptoin out when a loud skreech and much 
noises and laffin' burst upon us fi'um the 
doors upstairs. We wus scared an left, but i 
wonder wus it church after all or maybe 
they had the primery department upstairs 
instead of down cellar like our church. 

Then we climbed the aserfaltum some 
moar and went in a big big place. There 
was a big sofer with boys sitting on it I 
looked to see partikularly what wus they 
doing but they just set. and sorter looked. 
I went up stairs where a girl yells at me 
when I opened a door. 

"Hey little boys aren't allowed in Par- 
rish," I didn't know what was Parrish but 
I went downstairs. She had on pajamas 
like sisters only they was green and 
orangish and her hair must have been 
awful mussed becos they was at least ten 
comes in it. I hate one but then girls is 
funny ain't they Sooky? They is boys and 
girls both at this school. 

Next a big bell rang what wus the loud- 
est bell it made Skeet jiunp so he ran fast 
outen the door. I saw a man going real 
fast by me an a lady with nice eyes an 
reddish brown hair yelling after him down 



the hall Bran bran He didn't beer so I 
yelled Bran bran at him too anyway he 
turned around an went back so the lady 
quit hoUerin Bran bran He musta been a 
grocer an forgot part of the order. 




RRf -you C-0IW6 TD 1ia^ 

I was down admiring them put tacks by 
peoples names it must be a guessing game. 
When a man came up. He looked like 
Charlie Chaplin only his feet didn't turn 
out. He had on a red scarf an a blue vest 
an a green coat an a black pants and he 
sed to me Are you going to Yale? And 
this made me mad because no matter how 
funny I think anyljody is I never yell 
becos my mother says yelling is not nice. 
So I just sorta snuffled an said no with 
exposhur. 

I went out the back door of the school 
to see the back yard but everywhere I 
looked was a boy an a girl holdin hands 
an walkin so i went back. Boys and girls 
go to that school. 

I went to sleep in a nice house which 
there is six just alike but girls made so 
much noise i woke up an ran fast out. A 
girl name Linda got me and put me on 
the bus. 

I had a nice time at Swartlunore but i 
was so tired frum bells and girls and steps 
that I couldn't pray long but sed in my 
prayers god bless papa and mama an 
make me a good boy an give them chairs 
for the aserfaltum at Swarthmore. 
Affectionately sincere, 

(Apologies to P. L. Crosby) 



I 



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[293 J 



I 



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(Apologies to Gluyas Williams) 
















PofiTaaix QE BN Athlete dqing Hawaas Wdrk 



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[294] 






SERIOUS TALK 

PE 



JIMMY, THE NIGHT WATCHMAN 

■ Jimmy was hard at work when we were 
shown into his luxuriously appointed 
office, or office as he prefers to call it. The 
man's fundamental love of the beautiful 
was shown by the choice prints, etchings, 
statues, and things with which the room 
was decorated, or would cluttered be a 
better word? As soon as he saw us, he 
rose and a smile broke over his care-lined 
face. 

"I've been waiting to see you," he said, 
picking up a fragment of the broken smile 
and tucking it away in his wallet. "Tell 
Frank I'll take three extra quarts for next 
Tuesday and that the stuff he sent me last 
week was none too good." 

We hastened to explain that we were 
not from the ice cream store, but that we 
wanted an interview with him. He looked 
at us quizzically. "Well?" said he. 

"Very well, thanks," we replied. "A 
slight cold, perhaps, but cest la vie, you 
know." 

"Exactly," he said, laughing heartily, 
"cest la vie. Take a chair." 

"Oh, no," we protested, "take the recent 
presidential election. Now when Hoo- 
ver—" 



WITH SE 
E 



"One moment," he said, holding up his 
left hand and waving the east-bound traf- 
fic ahead with his right. "Do you know 
you greatly resemble the late Aaron 
Burr?" 

"Well, we hope you won't burr any ill- 
will towards us because of that," we shot 
back roguishly. The great man was con- 
vulsed with laughter. He might have been 
laughing yet had we not quieted him with 
a stern glance and told him that we had 
come for an interview and by the Third 
West of Parrish, we were going to get one. 

"You can look around if you want to," 
he replied sulkily, "but I don't think 
you'll find one. I have to be pretty careful 
with all these Student Government men 
snooping around." 

"Well, Jimmy," we asked, sharpening 
our pencil,* "how do you find the co-eds?" 

"Easily," he replied, "I just look around 
and there they are." 

"Really?" 

"Oh, quite. Life is like that, you know." 
His voice was husky with emotion. 



^Editor's Note — Ticonderoga Pencils 
used exclusively in this production. 
— (advt.) 



SWARTHMORE STUDENTS!! 

Save Money This New Easy Way! 



Get Rich Overnight! 
It's Easy ! 



The More You Spend 
The More You Save 



WHEN:— 

. . . you are two months behind with your book bill 

and the book store is getting nasty about it, 

. . . and you owe Frank for your last three haircuts, 

. . . and you haven't paid your registration fee, 

. . . and the bill collector is camping on your trail, 

. . . and you owe money to every third man you meet 

on the campus, then 

Be Nonchalant! Light a Murad and tell them to REVERSE THE CHARGES ! ! ! 



[ 295 ] 



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Gwen — I hear "Rusto's" gone blind 
from reading too many fine subtleties. 
What'U become of him? 

Ed — He can test Old Golds, of course. 



First Whartonite — Do you believe that 
awful story they've been telling about 
her? 

Second Whartonite — Sure, what is it? 



Mac — I'm overcut in everything, yet I 
don't flunk. 

Other Mac — That's the way to use the 
Varsity drag. 



Senior — I can't eat this stuff. Call Miss 
Brierly. 

Waitress — It's no use. She won't eat it 
either. 



She — Do you run on a time schedule? 
He — Only as far as the Alligator. 



Jean — Why does Ada always stand on 
one leg? 

Joe — If she'd pick up the other, she'd 
fall down. 



HAVE YOU A LITTLE WOBBLY TABLE 
IN YOUR HOME? 

We realize this is a very personal matter; but you can solve the embarrassing problem easily by 
putting the latest copy of SWARTHMORE LIFE under the shaky leg. Just send us a certified 
check for six cents ($.06) . Twelve nice new table balancers will be yours — a fresh and clean 
one every month just for clipping the coupon: 






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SWARTHMORE LIFE 
Gentlemen: 

Please send me " issues of your magazine, for 

not any 

which I am enclosing $ (no rubles or car tokens 

accepted). 

Yours truly, 



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[296] 



HOW DO YOU LOOK IN A BATHING SUIT! 1 





Prof. Dellmuth 



You 



LADIES PREFER MEN! 

I will give you muscles like mine, a neck like a bull's, a chest like a battleship. Women 
will worship you as they do me. I will give you POWER, STRENGTH, VIRILE FORCE. 
Just clip the coupon below and you will never live to regret it. 



PROF. CARL K. DELLMUTH 

SWARTHMORE COLLEGE. 



Dear Sir: 



Name 



Please send me your wonderful book 
"Virile Men." 



Address 



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"They also swear who only sit and wait" 

SEX APPEAL SALVE 

EARS REMOVED BY A TWIST OF THE WRIST 

CALENDARS FOR OUR CUSTOMERS 

(Note: A.A. credit with each massage) 



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A. E. Dry Cleaners & Dyers. 
Ayres, Inc 



336 

335 

B Filling Station 331 

Balfour Company, L. G 336 

Baton, Inc., Henry E 316 

Benner, John H •■.. 326 

Bioren & Company 333 

Blum Store, The. . ■ 329 

Breyer's Ice Cream 316 

Briggs & Son, Thomas L 331 

Brooks Brothers 359 

Buchner's Toggery Shop 344 

Buten & Sons, M •• • 336 

Callahan, M. J 323 

Chalfonte-Haddon Hall 311 

Chester Business Men's Association 31S 

Chester Candy Kitchen 348 

College Pharmacy 355 

College Restaurant 359 

Conard-Pyle Company 312 

Corn Exchange Nat'l Bank & Trust Co 303 

Crandall Bus Company 327 

Creth & Sullivan, Inc 316 

De John's, Inc • 320 

Delaware County Electric Company 352 

Dolbey & Co., E. P 332 

Durborow & Company, Chas. B 350 

Fable & Company, Inc 323 

Ferguson. Jos. C. Jr 340 

Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Co 322 

Franklin Fire Insurance Company 337 

Friends' Central School System 308 

Gill Construction Co., John N 321 

Gittelman, Harry 336 

Gray & Company .338 

Gulf Refining Company 314 

Gypsy Tea Shop 310 

Hackett, H. Berkeley 343 

Hahnemann Medical College 326 

Hall, Inc., Albert 321 

Hardwick & Magee Company 354 

Hotel Adelphia 309 

Harrison Smith & Company 327 

Haynes, James 357 

Highland Dairy Products Company 357 

Hires, Inc., Castner & Harris 343 

Howland & Thompson 308 

Ingleneuk Tea Room, The 340 

Insurance Company of North America 339 

Jackson & Moyer 313 

Jacob Reed's Sons 341 

Karcher, Walter T., & Livingston Smith 307 

Keene & Company 326 

Kelterlinus Lithographic Mfg. Company. . . . 346 

Lamb Company, Robert E 325 

Lewis & Company 340 

McArdle & Coney, Inc 320 

McCoy, H. M 332 

McNeill Construction Company 319 

Main & Company 349 

Marker, Burton L 338 



s 



Marot Flower Shop 315 

Maselli, Frank 310 

Metal Sales Company 350 

Middleton, M. F.. Jr 348 

Miller & Sons, 1 341 

Mitchell & Son, Allen R 324 

Molloy Company, The David J 359 

Morris & Company, John S 321 

Morris, Wheeler & Co., Inc 331 

Mutual Life Insurance Company 320 

Nicely & Company 332 

Noel Printing Company 348 

Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co.... 323 

Parrish & Company 352 

Pennsylvania Company, The 330 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co., The 308 

Philadelphia Co. for Guaranteeing Mortgages 338 

Philadelphia Photo Engraving Co 338 

Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co 335 

Provident Trust Company 301 

Ransom-Barton Company 359 

Reese, Inc., H. D 332 

Ristine & Company, F. P 344 

Sandura Company, Inc 325 

Scattergood Company, S. F 340 

Schilling Press, Inc., The 360 

Scott Paper Company 306 

Shirer, Victor D 327 

Sjostrom, John E 343 

Skytop Lodge, Inc 305 

Southwestern National Bank 328 

Spatola, Felix 354 

Spalding & Bros., A. G 340 

Spencer, Inc., John 310 

Standard-Coosa-Thatcher Company 338 

Stokes & Company, Walter 335 

Strath Haven Inn Company 310 

Supplee-Biddle Hardware Company 354 

Suplee, N. Walter 350 

Swarthmore College Bookstore 349 

Swarthmore National Bank & Trust Company. 315 
Swarthmore Phoenix 345 

Taylor & Company, Inc., Alex 347 

Temme-Daller, Inc 347 

Tome School, The 347 

Triangle Tuck Shop 335 

Tryon Company, E. W 315 

Turner Construction Company 326 

Vanity Box, The 352 

Vanity Fair Studio 331 

Vouge Beauty Shoppe 323 

Wagner-Taylor Insurance Company 318 

Walters & Sons, Wm. H 321 

Weymann & Son, H. A 334 

White Studio 356 

Whitaker, George E 336 

Williams & Co., Harry G 357 

Winston Company, The John C 353 

Worth Steel Company 351 

Ye Olde Print Shoppe 352 

York-Hoover Body Corporation 317 

York Safe and Lock Company 342 

York Collegiate Institute 320 



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Founded One Year After 
Swarthmore 

Provident Life and Trust Company, ancestor of the present 
Provident, was organized by a group of prominent Friends 
in 1865. In the years which have followed officers of the 
Provident have handled trust and banking interests of many 
Swarthmore students, alumni and their families — sometimes 
covering three generations. 

Could not this experience be helpful to you in your own 
trust affairs 

PROVIDENT 

TRUST COMPANY 

America's Pioneer Life Insurance Trustee 
Seventeenth and Chestnut 

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Fourth and Chestnut 




Twelfth and Chestnut 



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SWARTHMORE 
LIFE 





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OPEN A SAVINGS 
ACCOUNT— 




and enjoy the distinction that comes with 
"Banking at the Corn Exchange." 

Just as a man is known by the com- 
pany he keeps, so is he judged, in the 
world of business, by the bank he uses. 

All offices of the Corn Exchange 
National Bank and Trust Company make 
it convenient for you to save. 

To save money shows wisdom, but to 
put it in the Corn Exchange shows sound 
judgment. 



Corn Exchange National Bank 
and Trust Company 



Philadelphia 



Main Office 
Chestnut St. at Second 

Oxford Office 
Frankford and Oxford Aves. 

JVissinoming Office 
5906 Torresdale Ave. 



Central City Office 
1510-12 Chestnut St. 

Bridesburg Office 
Kirkbride, Ash and Thompson Sts. 

Orthodox St. Office 
2316 Orthodox St. 



Burholme Office 
Risins Sun Ave. and Cottman St. 



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[303 1 






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SKYTOP LODGE 






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"HIGH IN THE POCONOS" 

CRESCO, PA. 




THE IDEAL PLACE FOR YOUR VACATION 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



GOLF - TENNIS - SWIMMING - BOATING - FISHING 
BOWLING - HIKING - RIDING - WINTER SPORTS 



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Guide Posts 

We have been asked to contribute a page to the 
HALCYON of 1930. The extracts Mhich follow are 
characteristic of the replies we make to the numerous 
college men who periodically approach us with the 
very vital problem of choosing a business connection. 



In choosing the firm with 
whom you shall become asso- 
ciated we suggest that you in- 
vestigate several in various lines 
of industry seeking particu- 
larly the facts relating to the 
following fundamental ques- 
tions: 

First — Does the company 
aspire to leadership in its in- 
dustry and has it a reasonable 
chance to achieve it? 

Second — Is it managed by 
men of high character and 
broad vision who are capable 
^of inspiring an organization to 
give its best? 

Third — Is it actuated by the 
motive of rendering conspicu- 
ous public service, i.e., giving a 



constantly higher quality of 
service at reasonable costs, cre- 
ating a broad public acceptance 
of its product through adver- 
tising? 

Fourth — Does it provide a 
liberal basis of stock ownership 
for its employees? 

Fifth — Does its past record or 
its present trend indicate prof- 
its sufficient for its continued 
growth? 

If you can find in any indus- 
try the business which meas- 
ures up to these standards enter 
its employ without seeking 
special favors or considerations. 
Get started and give it your 
best. 



Scott Paper Company, Chester, Pa. 




[ 306 ] 






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WALTER T. KARCHER 
and LIVINGSTON SMITH 

ARCHITECTS 



1520 LOCUST STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 






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FRIENDS' CENTRAL 
SCHOOL SYSTEM 

EIGHTY-FIFTH YEAR OPENS 
AT OVERBROOK 

High School, Thorough College Preparatory 
and General Courses 

BOYS and GIRLS 

Separate Departments 

ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT, including 

KINDERGARTEN at OVERBROOK 

Country Day Plan; Campus and Athletic Fields, 

18 Acres; Modern Equipment, New Gymnasium, 

Specialists' Faculty, Wholesome and Homelike 

Atmosphere; Convenient Bus Service 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

35th St. and Lancaster Ave., West Philadelphia 
Greene St., above School Lane, Germantown 

BARCLAY L. JONES, Ph.D., Principal 
Overbrook, Pa. 



Rowland & 
Thompson 

526 Market Street 
Philadelphia 

Specializing 
in 

Steel Cutting Tools 
Drills, Reamers, Taps, Dies 

and Cutters 



CECIL F. SHALLCROSS, President 



HARRY A. CARL, Assistant Secretary 

1825 — 1929 
The 



T. MAGILL PATTERSON, Secretary 



Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Company 



CECIL F. SHALLCROSS 
JOSEPH WAYNE, Jr. 
GEORGE H. FRAZIER 



CHARTER PERPETUAL 

Over a Hundred Years Old 

OQic&: 508-510 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia 

Directors 
MORRIS L. CLOTHIER 
L. H. KINNARD 
HENRY I. BROWN 



WILLIAM W. BODINE 
WILLIAM F. KURTZ 
.ALAN H. REED. 



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DANCES and BANQUETS 



Whether for two or hundreds, you will find 
just the accommodation you desire. 

The Roof Garden, open May till October, with 
its up-to-the-minute dance orchestra is delight- 
ful for dinner and supper. 

Fraternity committees are invited to receive 
estimates for dances, dinners and conventions. 

WHERE CHILDREN ARE SERVED AT HALF PRICE' 




I 



CHARLES E. GOODIN, Pres., Managing Director 



A. W. BAYLITTS, Manager 



HOTEL ADELPHIA 



NEAREST EVERYTHING 



CHESTNUT AT 13th 



PHILADELPHIA 



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Strath Haven Inn 



SWARTHMORE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Always Open 



STRATH HAVEN TEA ROOM 



Telephone — Swarthmore 680 



FRANK MASELLI 
College Barber 

Park Avenue 
Swarthmore 



Pcirties and Teas in 
Private Rooms 



For Reservations Call 
Rittenhouse 6181 



"A real fortune read gratis from your tea cup" 

GYPSY TEA SHOP 

Come in ana make a wish 



CHICKEN SALAD SANDWICH, CAKE & TEA— 75c 

COPYRIGHTED 

1127 CHESTNUT STREET, 2nd Floor 

PHILADELPHIA 

Opposite Keith Theacre 

Hours: 11 to 8 — Sunday 3 to 8 



JOHN SPENCER 



INCORPORATED 



PRINTING - LITHOGRAPHING 
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS 

8th STREET near SPROUL, CHESTER, PENN A. 



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Fresh Vegetables 1 



Right from 
the Farm! 



Right from the farm, and straight 
to the kitchen door — all in a morn- 
ing! And there among shining pots 
and pans and great ovens . . . with 
fruit and meat and butter and milk 
. . . those vegetables prepare for the 
great event — your dinner! 

And your food will be just as well 
served as it is deliciously prepared. 
Your own waitress, trained for three 
months before she enters the dining- 
hall, quickly learns your likes and 
dislikes. The room is quiet, though 




table, as other guests have theirs . . . 
everyone is friendly and very much 
at home. 

As a matter of fact, most of the 
guests look upon Chalfonte-Haddon 
Hall in just that way — as home. 
They come down year after year. 
They soon seek out their favorite 
chairs. . . . Employees know them, 
and they know the employees. . . . 
They find the rooms large and 
bright . . . the whole place abound- 
ing in little courtesies. In a word, 



quite large. You have your own they are comfortable. 



Further hijormatioii about Chalfonte-Haddon Hall is givsii in book- 
let form. We will be glad to mail a copy to any Sti'arthmore student 



CHALFONTE^HADDON HALL 

American Plan ATLANTIC CITY 

heeds and Lippincott Company 



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Quality — Satisfaction — Service 

INVESTMENTS 

IN GOOD 
APPEARANCE 

Offering an advanced service, providing gentle- 
men's apparel to best express the ideals of right 
style, good taste and dignity of the wearer. 

pjackson (X Moyer 

^"■^^1610 -I6ia CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 




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OH THESE 
CO'EDS! 





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Your Community Bank 

We are particularly interested in the success of business men and 
residents in this district because we realize that, as a servant of the com- 
munity, our prosperity is dependent upon the quality of service we give. 



Our officers are more than experienced bankers, thoroughly 
familiar with local conditions — they are friends and neigh- 
bors whose interests are the same as your own. 

How Can We Help You? 



Swarthmore National Bank 
and Trust Company 

Established 1904 



THE 

Marot Flower Shop 

315 Dickinson Ave. 

CUT FLOWERS, PLANTS and BASKETS 

BOUQUETS MADE TO ORDER 

Flowers Telegraphed 
PHONE SWARTHMORE 554 



Compliments of 

Chester Business 
Men's Association 

Joseph J. Grieco, Secretary 



Edw» K, Try on Co* 

Sporting Goods Since 1811 



Basket Ball 
Sweaters 



Field Hockey 
Swimming Suits 



Athletic Qoods of Every 
Description 



912 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



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HENRY E. BATON 



INCORPORATED 



GENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTORS 



PHILADELPHIA 



Palestra-Gymnasium - - - - - - - -U. of Penna. 

Phil Kappa Psi Lodge ------- Sweurthmore 

Phi Delta Theta U. of Penna. 

Power House --------- Princeton 

Chapel Foundations -------- Princeton 

Member 
Assoc. Penna. Constructors 
Assoc. Gen'l Contractors 



Marshall P. Sullivan 
President 



Francis W. D'Olier 
Treasurer 



Established 1881 



Creth &L Sullivan 

Incorporated 

INSURANCE 



210 SOUTH FOURTH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 




BREYER 
ICE CREAM CO, 



"Patronize the 
Breyer Dealer" 



Philadelphia 
Washington 



New York 
Newark 



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Compliments 

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YORK-HOOVER 
BODY CORPORATION 

DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS 
of 

COMMERCIAL AUTOMOBILE BODIES 



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McNeill 
Construction Company 

Contractors and Builders 

Schaff Building 
1505 Race Street, Philadelphia 

Estimates Furnished for All Classes of Building 



Builders ot 
WORTH HALL PHI SIGMA KAPPA LODGE 



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^) DELTA UPSILON LODGE KAPPA SIGMA LODGE 

^' PHI DELTA THETA LODGE | 

ELIZABETH POWELL BOND MEMORIAL I 

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WOMEN'S FRATERNITY LODGES | 

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McArdle & Cooney 

Incorporated 

519 ARCH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



Distributors of 
WALWORTH PRODUCTS 

FULL LINE OF 

PIPE VALVES and FITTINGS 

PLUMBING 

and 

HEATING SUPPLIES 



York Collegiate 
Institute 



A Co -educational 
Preparatory School 



Scientific and Classical Courses 

Supervised Physical Education 

Large Gymnasium 



Add 



ress : 



Prof. W. R. LECRON 

York Collegiate Institute 

York, Pennsylvania 



The Mutual Life Ins. Co. 

of New York 



America's Oldest Life Insurance Company, 
is not only offering the most liberal contract 
ever issued, but at the lowest "Net Cost" for 
protection in the Company's history. 

Write for quotations on our new and up- 
to-date issues. 



CHAS. W. FULLER 

311 FINANCE BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




SPORT APPAREL 

"Exclusive but not expensive" 

1 PARK AVENUE 
SWARTHMORE, PENNA. 



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ALBERT HALL INC. 

A LTO R S,^^%^ I N S U RANG E 



IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII MMIIIIIII [TTTTTT 

LAND TITLE 
BUILDING 




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PHILADELPHIA 
PENNA. 



William H. Walters & Sons 



13104244 No. Carlisle Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



Heating 
Plumbing 



Power Piping 
Mech. Ventilation 



Compliments of 

John S. Morris & Co. 

Wholesale Buttef Dealers 
27 South Water Street 

Philadelphia 



JOHN N. GILL 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Established 1872 

INSTITUTIONAL & COMMERCIAL 
BUILDINGS 

INDUSTRIAL PLANTS & WAREHOUSES 

FRANKLIN TRUST BUILDING 
Spruce 6644 Race 6731 



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For the TRAFELER- 



who wants to retain control of his 
securities no matter how long he may 
be away, we recommend the opening 
of an Agency Account. 

This service includes the purchase, 
sale and delivery of securities in 
prompt obedience to orders from 
clients, and the execution of various 
financial details which we shall be 
glad to explain personally. 



Ask for our folder 
''When You Go Abroad" 



Fidelity^ Philadelphia 
Trust Company 

13 5 South Broad Street 
32 5 Chestnut Street 6324 Woodland Avenue 



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Say Sweet Number, jus' let Ole Hot Shot 
open up this lil' ole bottle-a-gin, an' 'en 
he'll show his Sweet Time how to make 
woopie. Co'se, Ole Hot Shot doesn't mean 
no different. Come on Honey, drag yo'self 
'cross that sink an' place them lilly white 
arms roun' Ole Hot Shot's neck co'se he sure 
am gettin' lonesum. Ole Hot Shot's been 
thinkin' about his lil' Doll all day, most 
nigh lost controU in Cal'ulus class. Lotsa 
room on this comfortable ole box here, so 
let's get a-rarin'; come on Honey Lips, — 
slide yo' lil' ole self cross that sink, on to 
Old Hot Shot an' we'll have the best lil" 
ole time 



[Continued from page 290 I 

sober up, as the case may be, directly on 
the campus. Of course, we of the Associa- 
tion realize that this is only a preliminary 
step, but we feel sure that it is a step in 
the right direction. Once the baths are in- 
stalled, our next project will be to raise 
money to provide the wee songsters with 
bathing suits, so that the little chappies 
may bathe in front of Parrish without feel- 
ing embarrassed or out of place. We call 
on all Swarthmore, undergraduate body, 
alumni, and even you, members of the 
faculty, to join with us in this humane and 
praiseworthy attempt to make Swarthmore 
safe for birddom. 



The Northwestern Mutual 
Life Insurance Company 

1015 Chestnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



"Over 50 Per Cent of the New Business in 
1928 was written upon old policyholders." 



RALPH W. TIPPING 



Telephone — Swartnmore 1297 



Vogue Beauty Shoppe 

Haiidiessing and Marinello Method 
of Facial and Scalp Treatments 

COLLEGE PHARMACY BLDG— ROOM 3 

Chester Road and Park Avenue 

SWARTHMORE, PA. 



"Colonial Old Method" 

— A Roofing Tin of unexcelled quality, 
produced by experts to uphold the in- 
tegrity of that most satisfactory of all roofs 
— the Good Tin Roof. 

CONSULT YOUR ROOFER 



FABLE & COMPANY 

Incorporated 

PHILADELPHIA 



During the Day or 
Any of the Hours 

THINK OF 

CALLAHAN 

AND 

''Say it ivith Floivers" 

3924 Market Street 268 South 20th St. 



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j ALLEN R. MITCHELL & SON | 

I SHACKAMAXON MILLS I 






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HANCOCK ST. and ALLEGHENY AVE. | 

Philadelphia ^g 

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Penna. ^3 

I 

MANUFACTURERS OF I 

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The Finest Grade 

FABRICS for MEN'S WEAR i 






I . I! 

Mi 

I ALLEN R. MITCHELL |! 

!i ALLEN R. MITCHELL, Jr., Swarthmore 1902 | 

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[ 324 ] 



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Here it is, folks ! A rug tliat takes the scrub 
out of "home-work!" There's nothing like 
Sandura — the only felt-base rug with the 
Sanduralac surface. This magic film of Sandura- 
lac — transparent, sparkling, permanently beau- 
tiful — repels dirt and grit, grease and moisture 

SANDURA COMPANY, INC. 

JOHN S. CLEMENT COS), President 



like water from a duck's back. As easy to clean 
as a glass window! 

If your dealer can't show you that Sandura 
line, we'll be glad to mail you a pattern chart 
direct. 

Finance Building Philadelphia 

RALPH G. JACKSON (06), Vice-President 



J^ #■ I F ■ w^ ■ ■ mm — — B^ J f M 

REQUIRE NO SCRUBBING 

KNOW OUR MEN WHO DO YOUR WORK 

It Takes Good Men to Do 
Good Work! 

The skill, efficiency and earnestness of the men in charge of a construc- 
tion job determine the quality of workmanship that goes into it. 

Materials can be specified; brains can not. Quality can be measured; 
faithfulness can not. Time can be checked; willingness can not. 

We are proud of our organization and the men who are part of it, not 
merely as employes, but also as part owners. 

Robert E* Lamb Company 

Constructors of Good Buildings 
PHILADELPHIA 



^% 



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[ 325 ] 



1 



I 



The Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

The completion of the magnificent new Hahnemann Hospital and ex- 
tensive remodeling of The Hahnemann Medical College gives students 
of medicine many advantages. 



Write for catalog to 



235 NORTH 15 STREET 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Mill ^' 



1 J 1 1 1 1 

1 
1 




Foremost among the office 
buildings constructed in New- 
ark, if not in the whole state 
of New Jersey, is the new 
Headquarters Building of the 
New Jersey Bell Telephone 
Company, recently completed 
by our company. 



New Jersey Bell Telephone Office Building 

Newark, New Jersey 
Voorhees, Gmelin & Walker - - - Architects 
Turner Construction Company - - - Builders 



TURNER CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



Boston 
Buffalo 



New York Ciiy 



Chicago 
Philadelphia 



KEENE & CO. 

OPTICIANS 

1713 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia 



Both Phones 



John H. Benner, Jr. 



JOHN H. BENNER 

Decorator 

2026 Sansom Street 

PHILADELPHIA 



HOUSE, SIGN and FRESCO PAINTING 



WALL PAPERS 



i^ 



i 



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[326] 



I 



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Harrison, Smith & Co. 



Members 

NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA 

STOCK EXCHANGES 



Represented by 
W. H. GILLAM, Jr., Class 1913 



1515 Locust Street 
Philadelphia 



63 Wall Street 
New York 





Victor D, Sliirer 


Compliments 


Druggist 


of 




GRAND ALL 




BUS COMPANY 


"At Your Service" 


Marcus Hook, Penna. 




"MISS CHESTER" 


Headquarters for College Pennants, 

Cushion Covers, Stationery, 

Souvenirs and Gifts 



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SOUTHWESTERN 
NATIONAL BANK 



i Commercia/ and 






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^ Sailings Accownts 

Courtesy Service and Banking ^f. 

I 



I 



BROAD AND SOUTH STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. | 

i P 

^ ' ■ i 

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S3 

JOHN T. SCOTT, JR., Chairman of the Board EUGENE WALTER, President \& 

JOHN M. DOTTERER, Vice-President HARR^' S POLLOCK, Cashier 

^; JOSEPH S. WEAVER, Assistant Cashier 

e;. ■ 

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[ ,328 1 



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"Fashion Corner" 

Kome of 
'First Fashions... First' 




-*22 Vs/Al_MUX ST 



'^ 



THOMAS STROBHAR 

Lacrosse Coach 1927 '28 '29 



WAGNER- TAYLOR COMPAISY 

KSXASX.IS1]:£:I> I860 - lN-COTlI>OItATEr> i018 



[ 329 ] 



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Incorporated March 10, 1812 ^ ^ 



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The Pennsylvania Company 



For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

(Trust and Safe Deposit Company) 



Packard Building 

S. E. Corner Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 

Philadelphia 



■ Downtown Office 



^^ 517 Chestnut Street 

S Cable address "PENCO" 



ACCOUNTS OF BANKS, CORPORATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS SOLICITED 



H 



Member Federal Reserve System ^ 

I 

i 



g CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT ISSUED TRUSTS OF ALL KIND EXECUTED % 

4 SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES RENTED f 

' i 



[330] 



^^ TSJTL^'SUi'jiJMiU'iiL ISyJMiU i'iLaMMlMJXli^^^ 



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THOMAS L. BRIGGS «Sl SONS 

"Everything in Sporting Qoods" 

TENNIS— GOLF— BASEBALL 

FIREARMS— FISHING TACKLE— CAMP GOODS 

Discount to College Students 
7th AND WELSH CHESTER, PA. 



Vanity Fair 
Studio 



^ 



50 per cent discount 
to Students 

Qlossy print free 

1631 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia 



B 

Filling Station 



WATER, GAS 

and 

AIR FREE 



Chester, Pa. 

B-Sub. 



Compliments of 

MORRIS, WHEELER & CO., Inc. 

Philadelphia's Largest Steel Warehouse 



[331] 



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ii 



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H. M. McCOY 



STETSON HATS 

MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 



525 Market Street 
Chester, Pennsylvania 



Edward P. Dolbey &l Co. 

Microscopes - Laboratory Supplies 
Medical, Dental, Biological Books 

3621 Woodland Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



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NICELY and COMPANY 



Insulation Engineers 
and Contractors 

TERMINAL WAREHOUSE 
DELAWARE AVENUE AND SPRING GARDEN STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



H. D. REESE, Inc. 




MEATS 


Compliments 


POULTRY CHEESE 


of a 




Friend 


1208 ARCH STREET 




PHILADELPHIA 





[332] 



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BIOREN & CO, 

f Established 1865 

I 
I 

BANKERS 

1508 Walnut Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

Government, Municipal 
Railroad and Public Utility 



IL 



BONDS 



a 



I Members of New York and Philadelphia | 

Stock Exchanges | 

I I 

I 



WALTER H. LIPPINCOTT E. RUSSELL PERKINS k 

Class of 1899 Class of 19U 

Member of the Firm Member of the Firm 



[ 333 ] 






^3 

i3 



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Boost for the Big 



s 



SWARTHMORE 

AND 

SUPPLEE 

ICE CREAM 

"Notice the Flai'or" 

AGENCY 
AT THE COLLEGE 




WEYMANN 

BANJOS 

MANDOLUTES 

GUITARS 

UKULELES 



M 



^everythind musical 
■^sincel864 

lYMAHN 

1108 Chestnut St, 



"Tell us, Jimmy, do you have much 
trouble with the co-eds?" 

He leered at us. "Well, I wouldn't ex- 
actly call it trouble." 

We leered right back at him. "Oh, so 
you wouldn't exactly call it trouble?" 

"No," he repeated, "I wouldn't exactly 
call it trouble." 

We were quick to perceive that this 
sort of thing was getting us nowhere at 
all and we made ready to go. "Thank 
you very much, Jimmy," we said. "You 
have no idea how our readers will enjoy 
this." 

"Come again some time," he called after 
us, "and I'll tell you just what it is." 

"What what is?" 

"What I wouldn't exactly call trouble." 

THE DEAN 

We found the Dean in the garden, 
busily picking beans. To be more exact, 
he was in his next-door neighbor's gar- 
den, but what of that? We are all com- 
munists at heart. He beamed at sight of 



lis. "I thought you'd be here to-day," he 
said, casting the beam out of his eye. 

"Why to-day?" we queried, pulling a 
mote out of our own. 

"Because it's Tuesday, ha, ha, ha; 
Tuesday, Tuesday, tra, la la," he caroled 
and broke into a Morris Dance. When he 
had finished we applauded vigorously 
and suffered" ourself to be led to a near- 
by rustic bench. 

"Sit down." he said. "Have a tooth- 
pick." 

"Well, it's a bit early in the morning 
for us to use a tooth-pick. so. if you don't 
mind, we'll keep it until later." 

"Not at all," he smiled. "I collect tooth- 
picks." 

"Not really!" we gasped, amazed at 
this side of his character. "Tell us about 
it." 



■Editor's Note — We don't think "suf- 
fered" should be used here. 

Author's Note — Speaking as one who 
was there at the time, we repeat that "suf- 
fered" is absolutely right. Who's writing 
this, anyway? 

{Continued on page 341) 






,^^ 



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[334] 



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I 



"When yoii think about life insurance, consult*' 
G. STANSBURY MILLER 

PROVIDENT MUTUAL 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA 

Founded 1865 
Philadelphia Agency: 401 Chestnut St. 



Where the Unusual 




May Be Found for 
Commencement Gifts 

AYRES 


TUCK'S OWN 
ICE CREAM ! 


INCORPORATED 


Rich Creamy Sodas 


CHINA - GLASS - LAMPS 
1929 Chestnut St. 


and Milk Shakes ! 
Candy — Baked Good Things 



WALTER STOKES & CO. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
104 South Fifth Street 



Philadelphia 



Bell: Lombard 6969-72 



Keystone: Main 1114 



^3 



(335 1 






^>. 



g;- 



&■ 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

Attleboro, Massachusetts 



Official Jewelers to the Leading 
Fraternities and Sororities 



"Knotvn Wherever There Are Schools and Colleges'' 



BELL PHONE, WALNUT S775 



Gittelman's Furs, Inc. 

Manufacturing Furrier 

IMPORTER OF SKINS 

1022 ARCH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



Paints and Glass of Quality 



The bare plaster walls 
and ceiling of the new 
Library have been 
painted with three 
coats of Ivory Sani- 
flat over a coat of Im- 
pervo Surfacer size. 
Examine this for a 
beautiful wall finish. 



OUR 32 YEARS' EX- 
PERIENCE ENABLES 
US TO SUPPLY ANY- 
THING YOU NEED 
IN PAINTS AND 
GLASS 



CALL BOULEVARD 
994 

. IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERIES 



Distributors of Amer- 
ican Window Glass, 
Barreled Sunlight, 
Craftex, Dutch Boy 
Lead, Koverflor, B. 
Moore & Co. Prod- 
u c t s , Quartz-Lite 
Health Glass, Sher- 
win - Williams Prod- 
ucts, Toch Bros. 
Waterproofings, Val- 
spar. 



M. BUTEN & SONS 



6926 MARKET ST. 



1834 SOUTH ST. 
PHILADELPHIA 



33 N. 7th ST. 



George E. Whitaker 


Compliments of 


Printing 




MORTON, PA. 


The A. F. Dry Cleaners 
and Dyers, Inc. 


Phone — Swarthmore 1019-J 


Swarthmore, Pa. 




•;^ 



[336] 



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ORGANIZED 1S29 



The 

Franklin Fire Insurance 
Company of Philadelphia 




i 421 Walnut Street 

i 



CHARLES L. TYNER, President 



Fire and Allied Branches of Insurance 

Service Unexcelled 




MARSHALL P. SULLIVAN, Agent 

210 South Fourth Street Philadelphia, Penna. 

i ( i rrfl i irgira i rs&7^iffirffljrsirri!frrittnyj?Ti'rTrt-r^^ 



[337] 






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Oldest Mortgage Guarantee Company in Pennsylvania 



Legal investments 
for trust funds 
in Pennsylvania 




Capital Assets 
$8,000,000 



There is no secret to financial success ... It is an open book with but four 
chapters : 

Chapter /^Work Hard Chapter III — Save Systematically 

Chapter II — Play Hard Chapter IV — Invest Wisely 

We urge the first, recommend the second, advise the third and offer every fa- 
cility to realize the fourth. 
First mortgages in any amount for immediate investment. 

PHILADELPHIA COMPANY for 
GUARANTEEING MORTGAGES 

Land Title Building, Philadelphia 

THOMAS SHALLCROSS, Jr., President 



Burton L. Marker 


GRAY &L COMPANY 


12th and Welsh Street 


Real Estate 


Chester, Pa. 


Insurance 




Pennsylvania Bank Building 


INSTALLERS OF 


CHESTER, PA. 


Plumbing and Heating 




IN 


Standard- 


Worth Hall 


Coosa-Thatcher Co. 


Bond Memorial 


Mercerized Yarns 


Women's Fraternity Lodges 


Chattanooga, Tennessee 



Sti«(bsd)S«iSvltS?il)SiilSffiifi^fil^t>S?l^ 



[338] 



■ <^ 



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137 years 
of experience 



When the Insurance Company of North America was or- 
ganized, in 1792, insurance needs were simple and few. 
Today they are many and complex. But they are met 
efficiently and economically by North America Policies 

and Service. 

Long experience, an equally long record of prompt and fair 
claim adjustment and the strength of a great organization are 
behind every North America Policy on your property risks. 




INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
NORTH AMERICA 

PHILADELPHIA 

and the 

INDEMNITY INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
NORTH AMERICA 

Write practically every form of Insurance except life 



[339] 



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The 

INGLENEUK 
TEA ROOM 

120 Park Avenue 
SWARTHMORE, PA. 

J//sf a Big. Friendly House 

Next Best to Home 

DELICIOUS LUNCHEONS 
The Club Dinner That Satisfies 

Chicken and Waffle 

Supper 
Every Sunday Night 

CATERING 

Phone Swarthmore 69 



Graduation is the big event 
in your life. Keep the record 
with a photograph. 



LEWIS STUDIO 

505 MARKET ST., CHESTER, PA. 



ESTABLISHED 1895 

S. F. SCATTERGOOD & CO. 

BANK STOCKS 
INSURANCE STOCKS 

PACKARD BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

lj<.'il — Rinenliouse 9122 Keystone — Race 1626 

N^w York Telephone — Canal 4210 




ftcoa^ 



PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES 



I Ba4 CHESTNUT 



PH I LADELPH I A 




[ 340 ] 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M^^iMEM^ 



5KFESE 



L MILLER &L SONS 

INCORPORATED 

Beautiful Shoes 

& 



1225 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



(Continued from page 334) 

"Gladly," he replied, pulling a handful 
of them ovit of his pocket. "This mahog- 
any one used to belong to James G. Blaine, 
and here's one that President Coolidge 
autographed for me. You may not believe 
it, but this well-chewed specimen once 
graced the mouth of Harriet Beecher 
Stowe." 

"How engrossing!" we thrilled. "You 
must get a great deal of pleasure out of 
collecting them." 

"Oh, a great deal," he replied, "but a 
great deal of sorrow, too. For years I've 
been trying to get one of King George the 
Third's, and now that it's been discovered 
that he had no teeth, I don't suppose that 
I ever will get one." He burst into sobs. 

"Come, come," we comforted, "don't 
give way like that. He must have used 
one at some time in his life, if only to 
keep up appearances." 

"Oh, do you really think so?" cried 
the Dean, becoming his old self again. 

We thought it would be a good time 
while the Dean was himself to ask him a 
few questions. "What do you think of the 




present situation in American colleges?" 
we ventured. 

"Abominable," he replied, gesturing 
with the garden hoe, "in fact I would 
say — but I have answered that question 
at great length in the last article I wrote 
for Scribners. You might look it up, if — " 

We interrupted him. "Can we depend 
on that?" 

"On what?" 

"On what you just said, that it's your 
last article?" 

He paused a moment to cut his name 
and the date into the handle of the hoe, 
then with a great effort he said, "Yes, it 
is my last. In the future I shall devote 
myself exclusively to my tooth-picks." 

"Thank you a thousand (1000) times!" 
we cried. "That's just what v/e wanted to 
know. What a fmore this will create! 
What a treat for oin- readers! — and for 
your readers, too." 

The Dean struck an heroic pose. "I re- 
gret that I have but one last article to 
write for my college," he said. 

We left him. 



'•7 



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[ 341 



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The York 
"A" Label 
Filing 
Safe. 



Your Records Are Not 
Insured 1 



YOUR fire insurance policy does not cover your books and papers. 
These records are of vital importance to the conduct of the 
business of your office. 

The only practical fire insurance you can get on them is the pro- 
tection afforded by a safe. 

The York Safe and Lock Company manufactures a type and size 
of safe suitable for every office. 

Don't gamble with fire — write today for complete information 
about York Safes. 



York Safe and Lock Company 

York, Pennsylvania 



aai grt . irri ! tT»r7r it |7Ti l f?T |i i!^ l iTril|7Tilr^^^ 

[ 342 ] 



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Compliments 0/ 



H. BERKELEY HACKETT 



SHOPS: OFFICE: 

2518 Morris Street 1110 Land Title Bldg. 

PHILADELPHIA 



JOHN E. SJOSTROM CO, INC. 

Cabinetmakers 

I 1719 North Tenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. | 



P 
Consulting Engineer | 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



HIRES, CASTNER & HARRIS, INC 

ENQINEERS | 

Designers and Builders of f 

AUTOMATIC MACHINERY 
Industrial and Research Engineers 




[343] 









it 



■u 



BUCHNER'S 

Toggery 

Shop 

8 PARK AVENUE 

SWARTHMORE, PA. 



Distmctive Haberdashery 



COMPLETE LINE OF CLOTHES 

FOR 
COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN 




Under the spreading mistletoe 
The homely co-ed stands 
And stands and stands and stands 
And stands and stands and stands. 



F. P. RISTINE & COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1902 
MEMBERS OF NEW YORK AND PHILADELPHIA STOCK EXCHANGES 

INVESTMENT SERVICE 

PHILADELPHIA 
123 South Broad Street 



^£ 



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fc- 



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NEW YORK 



FLI/.ABFTM. N. J. 



GREEN HILL FARMS HOTEL, OVERBROOK, PA. 



U \}U 'U' >'" "1^ liJ' ^'--'' ttij i\U 11.H iih I'.-'i tt.-i ti .; fi .t;i ii.-i ii.'j il' 



[ 344 ] 



Subscription for College Year 

$2.00 



SWARTHMORE PHOENIX 



Alumni 

You are interested in Swarthmore, its 
development, its teams, its activities. 
You are interested in your classmates. 
The Swarthmore Phoenix is the best 
medium for securing accurate and up- 
to-date information concerning these 
subjects. 



Undergraduates 

If you would like to know Swarth- | 

1 /" i^- 

more's Past and Present, and it you | 

■ h 

would like to show that you are sup- | 

porting Swarthmore activities — Sup- 
port Your College Faper. 



THOMAS S. NICELY, '30, Editor-iivChief | 

RALPH W. YODER, '30, Business Manager | 






[345] 







Lithographic Advertising 



ai 



m 



Ketterlinus Lithographic 
Manufacturing Company 



New York 



PHILADELPHIA 

Chicago 



Boston 



■;§ 



g- 



THE MAINSTEM 

Dear 1928: 

You really can't have forgotten every- 
thing so soon — it just isn't done, you 
know, not by the best of alums. But 
you're new at the game, I suppose, — 
you'll learn; and in a coupla years you'll 
come prancing back and tell us, oh yes, 
you helped dedicate the dear old flagpole 
and turned the first spadeful of earth for 
— yeah, worms to go fishing in the Crum. 
But acourse if you really are pining away 
for the latest developments, something'll 
have to be done because we simply can't 
aff'ord to lose these alums. Because, well, 
— they seem to give us most of the de- 
velopments! — The new addition to the 
library, f'r'instance. It was fiendish while 
it was going on — we got so we studied in 
rhythm with the hammers; only it was 
sort of complicated, some of us being 
syncopators and others not. You can see 
how it would be. But anyhow now it's 
done we just hope it goes "on and on for- 
ever" because it has simply the most 
divine front steps — that is convenient 
might be a better word, until they got 
the electric lights installed. Maybe by 



that time they'll he letting us use the 
• girls' lodges for fussing. Did you hear 
how a little Chi Omega was blackjacked 
over the head down by the Theta lodge 
one night? Now you know things like 
that would never happen if the big men 
of Swarthmore were allowed to frequent 
the lodges. B sub 1 and so forth — (argu- 
ment by Manning). You'd think we 
could convince the brand-new-head- 
matron of that — we have one, you know, 
straight from a Constantinople haarem. 
— and ril bet we could, too, only we'd 
have to send a few other people around 
here over for a year's haarem-experitnce 
also. But cheer up, when a girl gets too 
lonely after ten o'clock there's still 
.Jimmy-the-night-watchman on the Pet. 
He's sort of an eternal pill — last thing 
before you go to bed at night and first 
thing when you get up in the morning. 
You know, when you spring from your 
downy cot and run to shut the windows 
and you see Jimmy loping up the campus 
with his cigar and parts of his breakfast 
and you say Dear God another beautiful 
day! — I'll admit that sounds rawther 
English — but we're under a strong Eng- 
( Continued on page 350) 



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[346] 



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Correct Equipment 

for all 

ATHLETIC SPORTS 



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have the newest type printing, 
the last word in social invitations 
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They cost no more! 

Printing styles change from year 
to year just like one's clothing 
does. When next ordering re- 
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TEMME'DALLER, Inc. 

Phone — Lombard 659-i 

520 CHERRY ST. 
PHILADELPHIA 

Creators of Printing Fashions 



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TOME SCHOOL 



ON-THE-SUSQUEHANNA 



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A National Boarding School for Boys 



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For Catalog Address 

MURRAY PEABODY BRUSH, Ph.D., Director 
Port Deposit, Md. 






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Space Complimentarily 
Reserved 



(Bank of N. A. and Trust Co.) 



CHESTER 
CANDY KITCHEN 

The House of Quality 

CANDIES and ICE CREAM 
LIGHT LUNCHES 

532 MARKET STREET 
CHESTER, PA. 

GEORGE N. VARLAN 



Morris P. lewis 
Treasurer 



Lombard 7966 
Main 5940 



Noel Printing Company 

Incorporated 

Commercial-PRINTERS - Catalogues 

112-114 North Seventh Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



M, F, Middleton, Jr, &l Co, 

1510-12 Chestnut Street 



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Private Wires to Netv York 



MEMBERS OF 
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

PHILADELPHIA STOCK EXCHANGE 



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MAIN AND COMPANY 

Certified Prtblic Accountants 

PACKARD BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



NEW YORK 
149 Broadway 

BOSTON, MASS. 
201 Devonshire Street 



PITTSBLrRGH 
Farmers Bank Building 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
208 South LaSalle St. 



HARRISBURG, PA. 
Mechanics Trust Bldg. 



TULSA, OKLA. 
Kennedy Building 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 
Niels Esperson Building 

FRANK WILBUR MAIN, C. P. A. N. Y. & Pa. 

WILLIAM R. MAIN, C. P. A. Pa. & N. Y. 

M. C. CONICK, C. P. A. Pa. 

FRF.D L. MAIN C. P. A. N. J. & Pa. & N. Y. 

A. LAWRENCE JACOBS, C. P. A. Pa. 

W. W. COLLEDGE, C. P. A. Pa. 

S. LEO RUSLANDER, Tax Counsel 




THE 



Swarthmore College Bookstore 



Maintained by the College for the convenience 
of Students and Faculty 



Basement of PARRISH HALL 



Phone — Swarthmore 200 



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Hardware Store 

N. Walter Suplee 

5warthmore Pennsylvania 



Metal Sales Company 

Nickel Silver — Phosphor Bronze 

Brass and Copper 

Brass Fittings 



133 Arch Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 






lish influence this year with three im- 
ports from Oxford living in Bond and 
aromid the campus. And Bond, by the 
way, gets bigger and better every day. 
They just spent the money we're going 
to give them next Christmas, furnishing 
an enchanting little dressing-room for the 
girls, down by the boys' cloakroom. It 
actually has boudoir lamps and looks so 
homelike that when a boy busted in 
there by mistake the other night he 
backed out all over blushes, apologizing 
in a loud voice for intruding on Mrs. 
Whatshername bedroom ! The boys 
aren't all like that, though. Next time 
you're back look well at the panel of the 
dining-room door, because it isn't the 
same panel you used to look at — not by 
a long, swift shot. Student government 
can't be always paying for little things 
like that, so they decided to avoid the 
crush and open the other door. Which 
is all very nice except for those people 
whose greatest joy in life used to be 
watching the ingoings and outcomings 
of the dining-room ; now they can only 
see half as much — and you never can be 
sure that he, she or it won't go out the 
other wav. But it's still the thing to 



trot down anl see if you have any mail, 
and the fussing-rooms are still on east, 
so it usually turns out all right, — I mean 
one usually turns in all right. — oh well, 
you know what I mean. And I guess ye 
olde institution of fussing isn't quite 
dead yet, in spite of some swift competi- 
tion: there have been a couple of engage- 
ments announced this season. And on 
the subject, they've had to put new locks 
on the doors and windows of the little 
theater, which is a shame because it used 
to be such a good place. But when 
somebody dropped a cigarette and burnt 
a bole in the curtain the one-act players 
got worried because they built a new 
stage set this year, and if that got burned 
up with the rest of Parrish it would be 
an irreparable loss. Well this mainstem 
sure is full of fast curves and drops and 
rises, and as far as I can see it just keeps 
right on going. But I don't. So if you 
want to know any more you can come 
back and go on a little educational tour 
around the place. Any day — glad to 
have you — don't bother to let us know — 
(i. e., continuous performance . . .), 
Yours for Life, 

1929. 



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CHARLES B. DURBOROW & CO. 

SUITE 1842— FIDELITY-PHILADELPHIA TRUST BUILDING 
123 SO. BROAD STREET - PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Telephone — Pennypacker 9350 

REALTORS 

SEASHORE DEVELOPMENTS 
SURF CITY, N. J. 
BRANT BEACH, N. J. 
ORTLEY BEACH, N. J. 



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BROKERAGE DEPT. 


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INSURANCE 




MORTGAGES 


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RENTALS 


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Compliments 

of 

Worth Steel Company 

CLAYMONT, DEL. 



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Bonds for Investment 

High-Grade Railroad, Public Utility and Industrial Bonds suitable 
for careful investors always on our list. 

INQUIRIES ARE INVITED 






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PARRISH & COMPANY 

Members of New York and Philadelphia Stock Exchanges 
New York Cotton Exchange, New York Curb Market 

MORRIS L. PARRISH GEORGE R. McCLELLAN PERCIVAL PARRISH, '96 ALFRED E. NORRIS 
FREDERIC R. KIRKLAND HAROLD A. NEHRBAS GEORGE E. NEHRBAS 



212 S. Fifteenth St. 
PHILADELPHIA 



25 Broadway 
NEW YORK 



Offices also at Harrisburg, Reading, Pa., and Rochester, N. Y. 
Phones: Philadelphia — Bell, Pennypacker 8600; Keystone, Race 7851. New York — Whitehall 7500 



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SUE D. ALGER SWARTHMORE, PA. 

"With Compliments and Best Wishes" 



Ye Olde Print Shoppe 


Compliments of 


Gleave L. Baker 




PRINTING 

In AH Its Branches 


Delaware 
County Electric Co. 


State Street and South Avenue 


CHESTER LANSDOWNE 


MEDIA, PA. 


MEDIA 



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^ If you have experienced delays, mistakes, 
overcharges, or unworthy results in your 

printed mat- 



ter, why not 
end your an- 
noyance now 
by communi- 
cating with us 1 

^No piece of 
work is too 
large or too 
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prompt and 
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tention. 



'ATALOGS, examina- 



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V_>tion papers and station- 
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delivered on time and at 
reasonable charges. Expert, 

interested service alone can relieve 
you of exasperations. Our expert 
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carry them through all your work. 
We specialize in educational print- 
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languages, school and college maga- 
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work that is "all Greek" to most 
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large organization in a way that has 
pleased many of the best-known 
institutions in the East. Some have 
employed us for twenty-five years. 



THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY 

Book Publishers Winston Building Printers and Binder 

1006-1016 ARCH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



[353 ] 



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BELL— WALNUT 8990, 8991, 8992 



KEYSTONE— RACE 7351, 7352, 7353 



FELIX SPATOLA & SONS 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

The Year Rotmd 

Hotels, Clubs and Institutions Supplied 

Readme Terminal Market Philadelphia, Pa. 



Harry W. Lang 

Swarthmore Alumnus, with 

Hardwick & Magee 
Company 

Manufacturers and Retailers 

Rugs and Carpets 

Direct from our own Mills 



Oriental Rugs 



Summer Floor Coverings in All the 
Popular Weaves — Linoleums 



'Retail Departtnent 

Ilia Market Street 

Philadelphia 




Supplee-Biddle Hardware Company 

511 COMMERCE ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Wholesalers of Hardware for 91 Years 



x7^^S^SWsi^i£Si^jmSj^:^^JW^S3sr!^iirsirx\fi'^'. M^t^afnufwrwrwxuoiiaiinni 



3541 



S^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^MM^S2^22 



KSSSiST 



The College Pharmacy, our 

representative in Swart hm ore, 
has your tavorite flavors in this 
wonderfully delicious, DeLuxe 
Abbottmaid Packaged Ice Cream. 




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5<l 







This DeLuxe Ice Cream, in 
fancy molds for every occa- 
sion, is ideal for your parties. 
Ask at the Pharmacy about 
these special forms. 



A Store Where We Try 
to Make You Feel at Home 






!>i^! 






Courteous, friendly service, and an 
unusual variety of everything a 
first-class, modern drug store car- 
ries. 



Prompt delivery from 8 A, M. to midnight 
Just call Swarthmore 857 



COLLEGE PHARMACY 

Park and Chester Road, Swarthmore 



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[355 ] 



iSg^^iM^S^M^^^^^SSS^^ESSM^MS^S^S^JMSSlS^SSSSSSl^SSSSiS 






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T^ QUIPPED with many years' 
experience for making pho- 
tographs of all sorts desirable 
for illustrating college Annuals. 
Best obtainable artists, work- 
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prompt and unequalled service. 




Photographers to 
"1930 Halcyon" 

220 West 42nd Street, New York 



[356] 



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FOR SATISFACTION IN QUALITY AND SERVICE 

TRY 

Highland Dairy Products Co.'s 
MILK AND CREAM 

ASK OUR DRIVERS TO CALL OR 'PHONE CHESTER 934 



ESTABLISHED 1883 



JAMES HAYNES 

Practical Upholsterer 



Mattresses Renovated and Sterilized. Have your 
Carpets and Rugs Cleaned and Shampooed, and 
get your work done by a Master. Both Phones. 



AUTO DELIVERY 



18 Walnut Street 



Clifton Heights, Pa. 



Harry G. Williams & Co. 
COAL — COKE 

1077 Drexel Building 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



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AN ASSOCIATION ■ OF SKILLED CRAFTSMEN - DESIGNEES & PHOTO- 
ENGRAVERS - RENDERING SUPERIOR PHOTO - ENGRAVING SERVICE 



Engravers for this book 



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PHILADELPHIA 

PHOTO -ENGRA^^^^ COMPANY INC. P i 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN JAMES ^^^ ^\ 29 NORTH SIXTH STREET \ \)^ 

PRESIDENT // fpfy\ PHILADELPHIA J W 



A SERVICE — unique in its scope . . . 
a responsibility — tremendous in 
^ i its varying detail ... an accomplish- 

ll C ment — great in the satisfaction it has 

i ^ given to others and to ourselves. This 

year we are again privileged to design, 
engrave and supervise the publishing of 
the year books of many of our leading 
colleges and schools, and we acknowl- 
edge with pride this service to the 
great Government school at West Point, P | 

THE UNITED STATES MILITARY } | 

^ *^ ACADEMY. i I 



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ESTABLISHED 1818 




_^ _ Ic^C 

MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET 
NEW YORK 

Clothes for Vacation 

and 

Summer Sport 

Send for New Illustrated Catalogue 



BOSTON 

Newbury corner of Berkeley Street 
newport palm beach 



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J GROOKS BROTHERS 



Ransoni'Barton Co, 

"ARBYCRAFT" 
Kitchen Equipment 

For 

INSTITUTIONS 

COLLEGES 

SCHOOLS 

HOTELS 

ETC. 



1211 Race Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
The DAVID J. 
MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



©t/fry Mo Hoy Mode 

Cover bean thia 

aadt mark on th» 

backlid. 



College Restaurant 

serving the best food money can buy. Sam handles 
the entire preparation of the food, and you can 
depend on his sincerity toward his friends getting 
real, clean and wholesome meals. 

QUICK SERVICE 
COURTEOUS ATTENTION 



; ik. ' ;iu;;'^'a uiiuj;iwijw nviiiu¥^' i iU'M 'M'''iJ i > i^'!la^^U.'i ^^ 









Z.//^g Oi^/z^r of (^America's Leading Qolleges 
the Students of Swarthmore £ollege — 



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/^ • ( Qreators of the 1930 Halcyon 



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OUR School and College Department makes 
available the best skilled mechanics, modern 
equipment and methods, assuring you the pro- 
duction of the highest tvpe of College Annuals. 



Some of the Leading Colleges 
Buying Schilling Press Products 

U. S. Naval Academy ------- Annapolis 

U. S. Military Academy West Point, N. Y 

N. Y. Military Academy ----- Cornwall, N. Y, 

Princeton University ------ Princeton, N. J, 

Rutgers College -.---. New Brunswick, N. J 
University of Pennsylvania ----- Philadelphia, Pa 

Georgetown University ----- Washington, D. C 



Stevens Institute 

Columbia University 

New York University 

Pratt Institute 

Barnard College - _ _ 

Marymount College 

Teachers College - - - 

Elmira College . - - 

St. Paul's - - . - 

Cooper Union - - - 

College of the City of New York 

Lawrence School 

Groton School - - - - 



Hoboken, N 

- New York City 
New York City 

- Brooklyn, N. Y. 

New York City 

Tarrytowrn, N. Y. 

New York City 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Concord, N. H. 

- New York City 
New York City 

Hewlett, Long Island 
Groton, Mass. 



THE SCHILLING PRESS, Inc. 

PRINTERS OF QUALITY 

Schilling Building 137-139 East 25th Street, New York 



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